Atlantic Provinces – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ Mon, 21 Jun 2021 21:24:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://davidthompsonthings.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Atlantic Provinces – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ 32 32 Discussions “currently underway” over what the plan to reopen the Canadian border will mean for Nova Scotia https://davidthompsonthings.com/discussions-currently-underway-over-what-the-plan-to-reopen-the-canadian-border-will-mean-for-nova-scotia/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/discussions-currently-underway-over-what-the-plan-to-reopen-the-canadian-border-will-mean-for-nova-scotia/#respond Mon, 21 Jun 2021 20:49:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/discussions-currently-underway-over-what-the-plan-to-reopen-the-canadian-border-will-mean-for-nova-scotia/ Nova Scotia’s plan to reopen allows travelers from international destinations to begin arriving in Phase 4, which is not expected to go into effect until July 14 With files from the Canadian Press The Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness said “discussions are currently underway” about the impact the federal government’s plan to reopen […]]]>


Nova Scotia’s plan to reopen allows travelers from international destinations to begin arriving in Phase 4, which is not expected to go into effect until July 14

With files from the Canadian Press

The Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness said “discussions are currently underway” about the impact the federal government’s plan to reopen the border will have on our province.

On July 5 at 12:59 a.m. Halifax time, the first step in easing Canada’s border restrictions comes into effect.

Fully vaccinated travelers already eligible to enter Canada – including citizens, permanent residents and those registered under the Indian Act – may forgo the 14-day federal quarantine, including hotel stay government authorized.

They should have received their second dose at least two weeks before arriving and should test negative before boarding the plane and then again on descent. They will also need to have a quarantine plan ready in case this second test is positive.

However, in addition to the federal government’s 14-day quarantine, Nova Scotia currently also requires most people entering the province to self-isolate for two weeks.

Nova Scotia is currently in Phase 2 of its plan to reopen, and effective Wednesday, Atlantic Canadians will be exempt from quarantine.

If all goes well, we’re supposed to come in Phase 3 next Wednesday, June 30. Under the current pattern, at that time, travelers from provinces and territories outside of Atlantic Canada will be allowed in, but will still be required to self-isolate when they arrive here.

It is currently hoped that we will be able to reach Phase 4 July 14, when travelers from international destinations will be allowed to arrive. The reopening plan warns those coming from any destination outside of Atlantic Canada “may still have to self-isolate for 14 days” at this point.

“The period of time you need to isolate yourself may be based on your immunization status and your tests,” says the plan to reopen Nova Scotia.

The province has yet to release specific details.

When asked by HalifaxToday.ca how Canada’s lifting of federal quarantine restrictions in early July could affect Nova Scotia’s reopening schedule, the Department of Health and Wellness replied, “We’re coming. to be informed of today’s announcement by the federal government, ”adding,“ We ​​expect to have more to share on the subject soon. ”

Canadian Public Safety Minister Bill Blair said the government is still urging people not to travel overseas at this time, but noted that border restrictions that began over 15 months ago ” were never designed to be permanent “.



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First Nations up to five times more likely to contract COVID-19, experts say https://davidthompsonthings.com/first-nations-up-to-five-times-more-likely-to-contract-covid-19-experts-say/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/first-nations-up-to-five-times-more-likely-to-contract-covid-19-experts-say/#respond Sat, 19 Jun 2021 02:09:43 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/first-nations-up-to-five-times-more-likely-to-contract-covid-19-experts-say/ TORONTO – Rising COVID-19 rates in the remote Ontario community of Kashechewan highlights how hard the virus has hit First Nations. The current rate of positive COVID-19 cases on First Nations reserves as of June 1 is 188% of the rate of the Canadian population – although the death rate is 61% of the rate […]]]>


TORONTO – Rising COVID-19 rates in the remote Ontario community of Kashechewan highlights how hard the virus has hit First Nations.

The current rate of positive COVID-19 cases on First Nations reserves as of June 1 is 188% of the rate of the Canadian population – although the death rate is 61% of the rate of the Canadian population, according to Indigenous Services Canada.

“It’s no surprise that more people in First Nations communities are affected by COVID-19,” Lynne Innes, president and CEO of the Weeneebayko Area Health Authority, told CTVNews.ca. “I have worked in many remote First Nations and have seen the issues and the struggle with lack of infrastructure, overcrowded housing and water issues.

A report released Thursday shows that since the start of the pandemic, there have been more than 31,300 cases of COVID-19 on First Nations reserves and more than 1,400 hospitalizations. There are also currently 868 active cases of COVID-19 in these communities, with the proportion of cases in Kashechewan representing around 25 percent of all active cases on First Nations reserves.

“This community has been hit hard by COVID-19,” Innes said. ” In our region [northern Ontario], the majority of cases – I say at least 80 percent of our cases – are children between the ages of 12 and 17.

HOW DOES EACH REGION COMPARE?

Alberta reported the most cumulative cases to date with a total of almost 8,800 cases and closely followed by Manitoba. Although Ontario has accumulated a total of just over 2,600 cases, 56 positive cases of COVID-19 were reported this week in First Nations communities across the province and 212 cases last week.

Federal Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller said these communities were hit hard in Wave 2, and while cases are starting to slow down, it’s important to stay vigilant.

“Knowing what science said, in general, indigenous peoples [are] 3.5 to five times more likely to contract and experience the worst effects of COVID-19, ”Miller told CTVNews.ca. “There’s a pretty bright light at the end of the tunnel, but we’re not out of the woods yet.”

WOMEN 20-39 AT HIGHER RISK

Throughout the pandemic, people in First Nations communities aged 20 to 39 reported the highest number of COVID-19 cases, accounting for over 30% of cases. Positive cases of COVID-19 have been particularly observed in women in this age group.

IMMUNIZATION EFFORTS

Currently, 687 First Nations communities are vaccinated. From Friday, nearly 589,000 doses were administered, 39% of injections administered being a second dose.

Miller said more than 80 percent of adults have now been vaccinated with a single dose, and about 72 to 73 percent for people 12 and older. But, there are still concerns for the younger population who have contracted the virus and who are unable to get vaccinated.

“We have worked with Chief Leo Friday and his community to secure isolation tents and medical tents, as well as with the armed forces where Rangers have been active since June,” he said. “We will stop at nothing to help them. “

As vaccinations continue in First Nations communities, more than 40 percent of people have been vaccinated with two doses. With the support of the Rangers and the continued vaccination efforts, Miller said he hopes everyone who is ready to get a full vaccination by the fall and curb the spread of the virus on First Nations reserves.



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Some cross the border to return home, others “just for fun” on the first day of phase 2 https://davidthompsonthings.com/some-cross-the-border-to-return-home-others-just-for-fun-on-the-first-day-of-phase-2/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/some-cross-the-border-to-return-home-others-just-for-fun-on-the-first-day-of-phase-2/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 20:59:59 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/some-cross-the-border-to-return-home-others-just-for-fun-on-the-first-day-of-phase-2/ Jocelyne Johnson was eager to enjoy the freedom of simply being able to cross the New Brunswick-Quebec border on Thursday. On the first day New Brunswickers were allowed to do so, Johnson and her husband, George Johnson, got into their car from their home in Sainte-Basile – just outside of Edmundston – and drove across […]]]>


Jocelyne Johnson was eager to enjoy the freedom of simply being able to cross the New Brunswick-Quebec border on Thursday.

On the first day New Brunswickers were allowed to do so, Johnson and her husband, George Johnson, got into their car from their home in Sainte-Basile – just outside of Edmundston – and drove across to in Dégelis, Quebec.

“Just for the freedom – just for fun, because we were doing this all the time. When there is something that you are not allowed to do, you miss it.”

As part of its “green road,” New Brunswick entered its Phase 2 of easing restrictions on Thursday, which includes free movement within the province from the Atlantic provinces, as well as free movement. into the province from the rest of Canada as long as travelers complete a travel registration form and receive at least their first dose of vaccine.

Jocelyne and George Johnson from Sainte-Basile, New Brunswick, traveled to Dégelis, Quebec. just to enjoy the freedom of being able to do it for the first time in months. (Gary Moore / CBC)

Although the Johnsons have only driven a few miles outside of New Brunswick, Jocelyne said the freedom is exciting as they can eventually go visit their daughter and grandsons who live in Quebec.

For Jacques Eelaney, the easing of restrictions meant an easier road trip to his home in the Magdalen Islands.

Before Thursday, Eelaney said he should have driven from Quebec to Souris, Prince Edward Island, to take the ferry to the islands.

Jacques Eelaney said the relaxed restrictions made it much easier for him to travel to his home in the Magdalen Islands. (Gary Moore / CBC)

But with the restrictions relaxed, he was able to modify his move plan to allow for an overnight pit stop in Shediac.

“Wonderful,” Eelaney said of the new rules. “Because we don’t have to cross New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island and all the way to Souris. We can stop and like to stop in Shediac every now and then. “

Eelaney said he also has family in New Brunswick that he hasn’t seen for two years and that he hopes to visit them now that he can.

“It will be very pleasant.

Moving to a new home and province can be stressful, but Thursday’s new rules made that a little less important for Hervé Pasquier and Veerle Debets.

Veerle Debets and Hervé Pasquier said the new rules will make it much easier to settle into their new home in Oromocto as they won’t need to self-isolate. (Gary Moore / CBC)

The two entered New Brunswick as part of their move from Petawawa, Ontario to Oromocto.

“It was a bit of a relief because now we don’t have to isolate ourselves, which makes our move a lot easier… with the movers so that they don’t have to wait two weeks to deliver our furniture”, said Pasquier, member of the Canadian Armed Forces.

“On the contrary, it will help us get comfortable in our new home and sort out our move and do all the paperwork like changing our license plates and changing our address. So that’s good.”



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Nova Scotia Expands Second Injection Eligibility of COVID-19; some have booking problems https://davidthompsonthings.com/nova-scotia-expands-second-injection-eligibility-of-covid-19-some-have-booking-problems/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/nova-scotia-expands-second-injection-eligibility-of-covid-19-some-have-booking-problems/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 00:54:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/nova-scotia-expands-second-injection-eligibility-of-covid-19-some-have-booking-problems/ HALIFAX – On the same day, Nova Scotia expanded eligibility to reschedule second COVID-19 injections, with some residents expressing frustration at not being able to increase theirs. The online reservation system automatically scheduled second doses 105 days later when it launched in March, but with a constant supply of additional doses, authorities have urged residents […]]]>


HALIFAX – On the same day, Nova Scotia expanded eligibility to reschedule second COVID-19 injections, with some residents expressing frustration at not being able to increase theirs.

The online reservation system automatically scheduled second doses 105 days later when it launched in March, but with a constant supply of additional doses, authorities have urged residents to rebook earlier when they are eligible.

Those who provided email addresses at the time of booking are notified this way, but some of the mail apparently was not received.

Kevin Potter says his 90-year-old father and 88-year-old mother have never received a notice.

“They never received an email for some reason. And I checked their trash in their email system and it looks like they never got sent,” Potter told CTV News since. his home in Bedford, adding that his father had tried to book again. the phone, but could not pass.

As it stands, the couple’s second shots are booked for July.

The provincial government announced today that Nova Scotians who have received their first dose of COVID-19 vaccine by May 1 and are expected to receive their second dose by August 14 can reschedule their appointments to earlier dates.

As of Wednesday, 715,070 doses of COVID-19 vaccine had been administered, but only 58,854 Nova Scotians had received their second dose.

the CTV vaccine monitoring notes that this represents only 6.8% of the population.

“To see us practically last on the second dose is pretty disheartening for Nova Scotians,” said CP chief Tim Houston.

“We went through the last few months where we were the last to receive the first doses, and we only started to catch up because other provinces started to supplement.”

But the province says the deployment has been on par with the rest of the country.

“The vaccine rollout in Nova Scotia is in line with national averages,” Nova Scotia Health and Wellness spokesperson Marla MacInnis said in a late afternoon email to CTV News. .

“All the provinces are very close to each other in terms of full vaccination. As the rollout of the second dose accelerates, Nova Scotians are encouraged to reserve their second dose earlier.

The vaccine booking site is a public resource where anyone can search for a nearby clinic or meeting place. Individuals who provided an email address at the time of booking will receive a rescheduling notice by In order to schedule an appointment for the second dose, you will need to use the rescheduling link provided by email or you can call 1-833-797-7772 if you are currently eligible. “

Many seniors seem to have been successful in doing so, according to the Canadian Association of Retired Persons.

“Now, for the most part, people seem to be doing fine, although there is a bit of a wait,” CARP policy officer Bill VanGorder told CTV News.

But he noted that some older people had noticed social media posts featuring much younger residents who were also receiving their second photo.

“They don’t mind, they’re happy everyone is getting them, but they wonder why the age, from oldest to youngest, seems to have gone a bit off the rails,” he said.

Kevin Potter agrees that the reservation system seems to be working well – for the most part.

“But if you are an exception like my parents seem to be, it is not easy to break into the government’s 1-800 system and the computer system to get a reservation.”

The Government of Nova Scotia’s toll-free reservation line number is 1-833-797-7772.



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A look at COVID-19 reopening plans across the country https://davidthompsonthings.com/a-look-at-covid-19-reopening-plans-across-the-country/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/a-look-at-covid-19-reopening-plans-across-the-country/#respond Wed, 16 Jun 2021 06:07:55 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/a-look-at-covid-19-reopening-plans-across-the-country/ As COVID-19 vaccination rates rise and the number of cases declines across the country, provinces and territories have started releasing plans to reopen businesses, events and recreational facilities. As COVID-19 vaccination rates rise and the number of cases declines across the country, provinces and territories have started releasing plans to reopen businesses, events and recreational […]]]>


As COVID-19 vaccination rates rise and the number of cases declines across the country, provinces and territories have started releasing plans to reopen businesses, events and recreational facilities.

As COVID-19 vaccination rates rise and the number of cases declines across the country, provinces and territories have started releasing plans to reopen businesses, events and recreational facilities.

Most plans are based on each jurisdiction meeting immunization targets by certain dates, while reducing the number of cases and hospitalizations.

Here’s what plans to reopen across the country look like:

Newfoundland and Labrador:

The plan to reopen the province begins with a transition period during which some health restrictions, such as meeting limits, will be relaxed.

Testing and self-isolation requirements are fully lifted for fully vaccinated Canadian travelers on Canada Day, while these requirements ease over the coming months for travelers on a single dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

If the number of cases, hospitalization and vaccination targets are met, the province plans to reopen the dance floors on August 15 and lift capacity restrictions on businesses, restaurants and salons while maintaining a physical distance between tables.

As of September 15, mask requirements for indoor public spaces would be reviewed.

New Scotland:

Nova Scotia has authorized the reopening of all public and private schools. A limit of 10 people meeting informally outside is in place, and all retail businesses are open at 25% of capacity with public health measures in place.

The outdoor terraces of restaurants and bars can open with two meters between the tables and a maximum of 10 people at each table.

Hair salons, barber shops, spas, nail salons and body art establishments are open but only by appointment.

New Brunswick:

The first phase of its reopening plan was due to start on June 7, but vaccination targets were not met and therefore did not take effect.

As part of the first phase, registration would be required to travel within the province, and no isolation or testing would be required for those traveling from Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Labrador. -Labrador, and Avignon and Témiscouata, Quebec.

In the second phase, the so-called Atlantic bubble would open up to Nova Scotia. Organized sporting activities would be permitted with an operational plan, and games and competitions with players and teams from outside Atlantic Canada would be permitted subject to travel requirements. Sites would be capped at 50% of their capacity.

In the third phase, the province would lift all COVID-19 restrictions.

Prince Edward Island:

The province has authorized increased personal gatherings so that up to 20 people can meet indoors and outdoors. Restaurants are allowed to have tables for up to 20 people. Special events such as courtyard weddings and birthday parties for up to 50 people, hosted by individuals, are permitted with a revised operational plan.

The province plans that on July 18, its non-medical mask requirement will be relaxed and gatherings organized by a business or other organization will be allowed with groups of up to 200 people outside or 100 people inside. .

On September 12, the province expects physical distancing measures to be relaxed, while allowing personal and organized gatherings to take place without limits.

Quebec:

Montreal and several other regions have gone from pandemic alert level orange to yellow, allowing indoor gatherings with members of another household, the resumption of outdoor team sports and increased capacity for weddings , funerals and religious services. Bars in the yellow areas can also accommodate customers indoors at 50% capacity.

Earlier in June, the province authorized the reopening of gyms and restaurant dining rooms as the province lifted all regions from the Red Alert level. Bar terraces have reopened and supervised outdoor sports and recreation are permitted in groups of up to 25 people.

The province ended its nighttime curfew on May 28 and allowed restaurant terraces to open as well as limited outdoor gatherings on private property. He also lifted travel bans between regions.

Quebec also announced that it is increasing the number of people allowed to attend sporting events and festivals to 3,500 on Thursday, a day before the Montreal Canadiens’ next home game in the NHL playoffs.

Ontario:

Ontario is following a three-step reopening plan that will see public health restrictions lifted every 21 days based on vaccination rates and other health indicators. Workplaces and public spaces should follow pandemic guidelines, including masking, physical distancing, and capacity limits during the reopening plan.

The first phase went into effect on June 11, allowing for limited alfresco dining, in-store retail, camping, outdoor church services, and outdoor gatherings for up to 10 people.

Greater retail capacity, personal care services, outdoor sports and entertainment, amusement parks and limited indoor religious services will be permitted under Stage Two, which takes effect if the province vaccinated 70 percent of adults with one dose and 20 percent of adults with two doses.

The third stage will further expand capacity limits for gatherings and retail outlets, and allow indoor dining, cinema, performing arts, museums, sports, casinos and other activities. interior with restrictions.

Manitoba:

The plan to reopen the province is based on COVID-19 vaccination rates and vacation dates.

If certain vaccination rates are reached by these dates, the limits will be relaxed for gatherings, travel, shopping and meals.

More than 70 percent of Manitobans 12 and older will have had to receive a first dose – and over 25 percent a second – before Canada Day to meet the first target. If this happens, businesses and other facilities will be able to open to 25% of their capacity.

Businesses will be allowed to open at mid-capacity if 75 percent of people have had a stroke and 50 percent have had a second by the August long weekend.

The end goal requires that 80 percent of the population have received an injection and that 75 percent be fully immunized by Labor Day in September. In this case, most businesses, services and facilities could open with limited restrictions.

Saskatchewan:

Large retailers must reduce the capacity of their stories to 25 percent, while other retailers must reduce their capacity to 50 percent.

Restaurants and bars must maintain a physical distance of two meters between tables or erect a structural barrier between tables, distancing is not possible. Tables are limited to six people at a time. The dance floors and buffets remain closed.

Places of worship are permitted up to 30 percent of their seating capacity or 150 people, whichever is less. And individuals should be two meters apart, unless they are part of the same extended household.

A maximum of 30 people are allowed to attend gatherings in the banquet and conference rooms, which includes wedding and funeral receptions. No food or drink is allowed.

A maximum of 30 people is allowed in a movie theater, but staff and customers must be able to maintain a physical distance of two meters. The same rule applies to live theater.

Alberta:

Outdoor social gatherings have recently grown to 20 people with an appropriate distance.

Indoor recreation, entertainment and other settings can open up to a third of the fire code occupancy. Places of worship can also open at a third of their capacity and restaurants are allowed up to six people per table, indoors or outdoors.

Youth activities have resumed with restrictions and outdoor public gatherings, such as concerts and festivals, are permitted with up to 150 people. A work-at-home order has been lifted, but it is still recommended.

British Columbia:

Seated gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted in banquet halls, cinemas and theatrical performances. High intensity fitness classes are permitted, and bars may serve alcohol until midnight.

Indoor religious gatherings are permitted with a maximum of 50 people or up to 10 percent of a building’s capacity.

Recreational travel to British Columbia is permitted, but the province is asking visitors from other provinces to visit the province later, when more people have been vaccinated.

The province tests each positive COVID-19 case for variants of concern and testing, tracking and tracing for each case remains a priority.

The rules regarding masks and physical distancing remain in place.

Nunavut:

Public health orders affecting what is allowed to open vary by community.

In Iqaluit, community travel is restricted to residents, medical officials and essential workers, as well as those who have permission for a compassionate exemption. Outdoor gatherings are limited to 25 people, while indoor gatherings are limited to one household plus five people.

Meanwhile, in Kinngait and Rankin Inlet, outdoor gatherings are limited to 100 people and those inside are limited to a household plus 15 people. Restaurants and bars are allowed to open their doors at 50% of their capacity, and there must be a distance of two meters between tables, with no more than six people seated or around each table.

Northwest Territories:

Up to 25 people are allowed in a business that follows an approved COVID-19 plan. Households can have up to 10 people with a maximum of five guests from another household.

Non-essential travel outside the territory is not recommended and leisure travel within the territory is not permitted.

Yukon:

Bars and restaurants are allowed to operate at full capacity with restrictions, while social bubbles have grown to 20 people. Social gatherings indoors of up to 20 people are allowed with a physical distance, while outdoors up to 100 people can gather. Organized gatherings, such as festivals or weddings, of up to 200 people are allowed with physical distancing.

Camps and recreational programs are allowed to have 20 participants indoors with physical distancing and mask wearing; and 100 outdoor participants with physical distancing. Gyms and recreation centers can accommodate up to 200 people with physical distancing.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on June 16, 2021

The Canadian Press



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In Dark Times, Canadian Hospitality Industry Seeks Recovery https://davidthompsonthings.com/in-dark-times-canadian-hospitality-industry-seeks-recovery/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/in-dark-times-canadian-hospitality-industry-seeks-recovery/#respond Tue, 15 Jun 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/in-dark-times-canadian-hospitality-industry-seeks-recovery/ Sparkling Hill Resort in Vernon, BC Accommodation in the Okanagan Valley has maintained the highest occupancy rates over the past year. Handout After the unprecedented collapse in demand in 2020, the Canadian hotel industry bottomed out in the first quarter of 2021. The average occupancy rate was 27%, the lowest level in a quarter. The […]]]>


Sparkling Hill Resort in Vernon, BC Accommodation in the Okanagan Valley has maintained the highest occupancy rates over the past year.

Handout

After the unprecedented collapse in demand in 2020, the Canadian hotel industry bottomed out in the first quarter of 2021. The average occupancy rate was 27%, the lowest level in a quarter.

The industry is counting on pent-up demand for pleasure travel – or “revenge travel,” as one analyst calls it – to trigger a comeback this summer.

“Demand is expected to increase significantly starting in the second half of this year,” said Brian Flood, vice president and chief practice officer of Cushman & Wakefield’s hospitality and gaming group in Canada. “Resorts in particular have very strong advance reservations, and some are full for the summer – at significantly higher rates. “

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An increase in summer bookings, the fulfillment of which depends on easing the province-imposed lockdowns expected this month, offers hope in a hotel association’s gloomy times over the Great Depression.

In the past 15 months, more than two-thirds of hotel rooms across the country were empty as international travel to Canada fell 93%. Even though hoteliers knew that reducing room rates would not generate demand in this environment, average room rates fell to $ 113, from a record $ 163 in 2019. Very low occupancy and Depressed room rates have dropped revenue per available room, or RevPAR – the industry’s key performance indicator – by 60%, to $ 42, from $ 106 before the pandemic, according to the latest industry reports .

Privileged stations

Sparkling Hill Resort in the Okanagan Valley. Small town markets have performed better than large town markets amid the pandemic.

handout

The pandemic has affected all types of hotels, from economy to full-service, but markets in small towns have performed better than markets in large cities.

Resorts and small hotels in British Columbia’s Okanagan Lakes and Wine Region experienced one of the smallest RevPAR declines in Canada, at 33%, as restaurateurs chose to d ‘Avoid urban areas when restrictions were lifted last summer, Mr Flood said.

Investor interest in resorts “has increased dramatically,” he adds. “We are currently working on five stations [acquisitions]. “

Conversely, “Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa – where hotels depend on conferences and international travelers – demand is very low,” says Flood.

Among Canada’s major cities, Vancouver recorded the highest RevPAR between March 2019 and 2020, at $ 56; the Atlantic provinces had the lowest, at $ 34. Montreal saw the biggest drop in RevPAR of 74 percent, from $ 137 to $ 35, followed by Toronto’s 70 percent, from $ 155 to $ 46.

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New hotel

Hallmark Hospitality’s fifth hotel is slated to open in Vancouver after the hospitality industry picks up.

Zeilder

Despite steep drops in revenues, plans for a new hotel in Vancouver continue.

The developer, Hallmark Hospitality, has airport hotels in Calgary, Edmonton and Toronto. The new hotel is the company’s second hotel in downtown Vancouver.

“The worst is behind us,” said Al Remtulla, president of Vancouver-based Hallmark, pointing to an increase in bookings in the United States and Australia, where restrictions have eased more quickly.

Still, he predicts, “We are looking at least three years ahead to see income normalization. “

Global travel data firm STR also predicts a return to pre-pandemic hotel revenues by 2024. Destination Canada says 2026. However, many global analysts suggest that 20% of business trips may never return due to the impact on the digital collaboration market.

According to Remtulla, revenues fell 74 percent at his airport hotels – Best Western Plus in Toronto, Best Western Premiere in Calgary and Sheraton Hotel in Edmonton – and 87 percent at his Ramada by Wyndham hotel in Vancouver. .

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“A combination of factors has kept us from going bankrupt,” he says. Strong government support enabled nominal operating costs, deferred taxes, and the retention of ‘hard to replace’ management staff – a dedicated team that took over tasks normally performed by laid-off employees (who were among 250,000, or 80 percent of the, losing jobs, according to the Hotel Association of Canada). He also organized mortgage deferral programs with his bank.

Few operations

Despite the financial pressure, Mr. Remtulla did not choose to sell his underperforming properties. “When business is going well, it’s really good,” he says. “Especially in Vancouver.

Indeed, the industry ended 2018 and 2019 with more than $ 15,000 per profit chamber – historic highs – according to CBRE.

This prepandemic force coupled with market uncertainty has deterred virtually all Canadian hotel owners from bringing assets to market. Only about 80 hotels, out of nearly 8,300 across the country, have been sold in the past year, down more than 40%. And only seven of those sales were formal, troubled transactions, says Flood.

Of the remaining sales, more than half of the volume can be attributed to “alternative use” transactions: hotels that were sold for redevelopment or conversion to social housing totaled about $ 550 million, a record. Government agency BC Housing, spurred on by the $ 2.5 billion Ottawa Quick Housing Initiative, was by far the most active buyer in the country, grabbing 13 hotels and converting them into social housing.

Heading into the second quarter, Colliers tracks “a sharp increase in hotel transactions across the country, both with traditional hotel sales as well as conversions to alternative use.” And while the advertised 40% selling price reductions have not happened, discounts of 10-15% are expected on sales in 2021.

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Mr Remtulla says he would have preferred to wait to develop a hotel after the pandemic, as the approval processes are taking even longer than usual. Hallmark Hospitality purchased the $ 22.5 million site, near Broadway and Oak Street, in 2017. The opening date of Zeidler Architecture’s design – a 12-story LEED Gold building with a woven wood exterior, conference rooms and a restaurant – is expected. well after the industry has fully recovered, ”he said.

Four industry forecasts

1. RevPAR will increase by 16% in 2021. With the rise of business travel and international travel, RevPAR will increase by 39% in 2022. (Source: CBRE)

2. British Columbia will lead the recovery. Many tourism operators in British Columbia depend on Chinese visitors, an economy that has rebounded quickly. (Source: Conference Board of Canada)

3. Transaction volume will exceed $ 1 billion in 2021. An abundance of marginal capital is driving a positive momentum. (Source: Necklaces)

4. The pandemic has been a catalyst for rapid, cost-based transformation, resulting in digital automations, more efficient ways of working, new stakeholder agreements, and operational efficiencies, many of which will be permanent – a silver lining to the slowdown. . (Source: Canadian Hotel Market Update Webinar: 365 Days Later)



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Canadians increasingly optimistic, reluctance to vaccinate drops: poll https://davidthompsonthings.com/canadians-increasingly-optimistic-reluctance-to-vaccinate-drops-poll/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/canadians-increasingly-optimistic-reluctance-to-vaccinate-drops-poll/#respond Mon, 14 Jun 2021 15:56:15 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/canadians-increasingly-optimistic-reluctance-to-vaccinate-drops-poll/ Breadcrumb Links New Local News The percentage of Canadians who said they were unsure of getting the vaccine or preferred to wait has fallen to three and four percent – the lowest since last summer. Author of the article: Cheryl Chan Release date : June 14, 2021 • 30 minutes ago • 3 minutes to […]]]>


The percentage of Canadians who said they were unsure of getting the vaccine or preferred to wait has fallen to three and four percent – the lowest since last summer.

Content of the article

As British Columbia nears entering phase two of its reopening strategy, two new polls show vaccine reluctance is on the decline.

Of the roughly 25% of adults in British Columbia who have not yet received the vaccine, 10% say they are sure they will get the vaccine and 5% say they are likely to get one. according to a published Insights West survey. Monday.

Another three percent say they are unlikely to be vaccinated against COVID-19, while five percent are strongly against the vaccine.

This contrasts with findings two months ago, when only 16 percent of British Columbians received their first dose and 23 percent expressed reluctance to get the vaccine.

“British Columbians have come a long way to ending this pandemic by accepting available vaccines and many of the hesitations we identified two months ago have dramatically diminished,” said Insights West President Steve Mossop, in a statement.

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Content of the article

“There is only a small group of five percent now who will definitely not receive the vaccine, which gives us hope that we can exceed the 80 percent threshold to achieve ‘herd immunity.’ that so many experts have told us is essential for getting back to normal life.

Also on Monday, the Angus Reid Institute released the results of a survey showing a similar drop among hesitant and reluctant people.

The percentage of Canadians who said they were not sure whether to get the vaccine or said they preferred to wait fell to three percent and four percent respectively, he said, the lowest since that the Angus Reid Institute began surveying Canadians last summer.

About nine percent said they would not be vaccinated, a slight drop from previous months and down from its peak of 16 percent in September last year.

Reluctance and refusal of vaccination are highest in Alberta and Saskatchewan at 18 percent. In British Columbia and Manitoba, 12 percent are recalcitrant, while the figure is 10 percent for Ontario, Quebec and the Atlantic provinces.

The Angus Reid poll also found that Canadians feel more confident they won’t contract COVID-19, although concerns remain even among those who have been vaccinated.

About 54% of Canadians – and 52% of British Columbians – say they are worried about contracting COVID, the lowest since June 2020.

Concerns are highest among people aged 55 and over, with 22% of them saying they are “very concerned” against 16% among people aged 35 to 54 and 22% among the 18-34 cohort years.

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With about 12 percent of the population fully vaccinated, 57 percent of respondents said Canada should give the same priority to second doses as to first doses.

About one in four say the province should continue to prioritize giving first doses among potentially more hesitant populations, while 16% said health officials should now focus on giving second doses. injections as quickly as possible.

In British Columbia, 23% of respondents say the government is taking too long to deliver second doses of vaccine, while 57% say everything is going as well as expected, and 20% say that everything goes well.

People in Ontario and Manitoba are more likely to say that the second dose is given too slowly.

Meanwhile, as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau pledged 13 million surplus vaccines at the G7 summit to help the poorest countries, the majority of Canadians, around 72 percent, say the government should first pull back. focus on COVID-19 vaccination efforts at home before focusing on overseas.

British Columbia is the most globally-oriented of any province, with 23 percent saying they support shifted efforts to focus on people at risk elsewhere in the world, up from 18 percent in nationwide.

More than seven million of the 13 million vaccines promised by Canada are expected to come from pharmaceutical company Novovax, whose vaccine has yet to be approved for use in Canada. Trudeau said the donation would not affect Canada’s own vaccination efforts.

The Insights West survey is based on an online survey conducted May 26-30 with a sample of 831 residents of British Columbia. The margin of error with the total sample is +/- 3.4 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

The Angus Reid Institute conducted its online survey June 2-7 with a representative random sample of 4,948 Canadians. A probability sample of this size would have a margin of error of +/- 2.0 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

chchan@postmedia.com

twitter.com/cherylchan

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Coronavirus: What’s Happening in Canada and Around the World on Saturday https://davidthompsonthings.com/coronavirus-whats-happening-in-canada-and-around-the-world-on-saturday/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/coronavirus-whats-happening-in-canada-and-around-the-world-on-saturday/#respond Sat, 12 Jun 2021 21:49:39 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/coronavirus-whats-happening-in-canada-and-around-the-world-on-saturday/ The last: Several provinces are benefiting from relaxed pandemic restrictions this weekend as the nation’s campaign to fully immunize Canadians against COVID-19 “accelerates rapidly.” In Manitoba, residents can once again congregate in small groups outside starting this weekend, a small reprieve from the strict pandemic rules introduced as the province battles an outbreak of infections. […]]]>


The last:

Several provinces are benefiting from relaxed pandemic restrictions this weekend as the nation’s campaign to fully immunize Canadians against COVID-19 “accelerates rapidly.”

In Manitoba, residents can once again congregate in small groups outside starting this weekend, a small reprieve from the strict pandemic rules introduced as the province battles an outbreak of infections.

As of 12:01 am Saturday, up to five people are now allowed to assemble in outdoor public spaces. Outdoor gatherings on private property are also permitted with up to five visitors from no more than two different households, in addition to residents.

All other current restrictions remain in place, meaning private gatherings indoors are still prohibited. Retail businesses are still capped at 10% capacity or 100 occupants, whichever is lower, and restaurants are still limited to take-out or delivery-only service.

WATCH | Manitoba Launches Vaccine Lottery to Increase Adoption:

Manitoba is distributing $ 1.9 million in cash and scholarships to encourage more people to get vaccinated against COVID-19. 2:28

The slight easing of restrictions comes as provincial health officials say they expect the daily number of COVID-19 cases to continue to decline, but warn the number of people in intensive care remains “extremely Student”.

The province reported 294 new COVID-19 infections and five deaths on Saturday.

In the neighbor Ontario, outdoor gatherings for up to 10 people and patio dining for up to four people per table are among the activities now permitted as of Friday. Non-essential stores may also reopen, with capacity limits, and outdoor fitness classes are permitted.

A region in northern Ontario, the Porcupine health unit, is currently holding back to relax restrictions due to a spike in infections.

Overall, new COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations in the province have declined in recent weeks. Ontario reported 502 new cases of COVID-19 and 15 more deaths on Saturday.

WATCH | Ontario is entering phase 1 of reopening after several months of confinement:

Ontario is starting to reopen after one of the longest COVID-19 shutdowns in the world. People can now shop in street-facing stores at 15% capacity, eat on restaurant terraces, and attend outdoor fitness classes. Additionally, Dr Susy Hota asked if the spread of the delta variant and breakthrough cases pose a threat to summer reopening plans across the country. 3:55

In the Atlantic, Newfoundland and Labrador brought all health units back to alert level 2 on Saturday.

Many areas in the western part of the province were moved to Alert Level 4 on May 30 due to a cluster of cases of unknown origin. Although the source of the cluster has not been found, health officials say the risk to the public is low.

NL also said it recorded six new infections on Saturday, five of which are cluster-related. Including the new cases on Saturday, there are 41 confirmed cases in this cluster.

The easing of restrictions comes as daily cases, hospitalizations and deaths have fell dramatically across Canada at levels not seen since the fall, while the country’s vaccination campaign is progressing steadily.

The country is expected to receive millions of doses next week. Chief public health officer Dr Theresa Tam said more than 28 million vaccines have been administered so far.

“The coverage of the first dose is excellent and the coverage of the second dose is accelerating rapidly,” Tam tweeted on Saturday, while again urging Canadians to get the vaccine if they haven’t already.


What’s happening across Canada

As of 5:45 p.m. ET on Saturday, Canada had reported 1,401,006 confirmed cases of COVID-19, of which 17,599 were considered active. The CBC News death tally stood at 25,914. More than 28.5 million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered across the country so far, according to the CBC vaccine tracker.

In British ColumbiaProvincial health official Dr Bonnie Henry said there had been a “dramatic drop” in the number of daily cases since April, and said the province was on track to ease further restrictions on Tuesday as planned.

Alberta recorded 179 new cases of COVID-19 and four more deaths on Saturday. The percentage of residents who have received at least one dose of the vaccine stands at 69%, just below the 70% mark set by the province to trigger step 3 of its reopening plan.

In Saskatchewan, two field hospitals set up in the province at the start of the pandemic – intended for use in the event of a massive increase in COVID-19 cases but have never been used – will be decommissioned, according to the Saskatchewan Health Authority ( SHA). Essential medical equipment, such as hospital beds, will be distributed in the province where it is needed most, the SHA press release said.

A COVID-19 field hospital is seen at Evraz Place in Regina. (Submitted by the Saskatchewan Health Authority)

In Ontario, the provincial government announced on Saturday that the wait between the first and second dose of the Astrazeneca-Oxford vaccine can be shortened from 12 weeks to eight weeks.

Astrazeneca’s new dose policy goes into effect Monday at 8 a.m. All new options will be provided with the “informed consent” of a patient, the Ontario government said.

Canada’s National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recently recommended that an Astrazeneca injection be followed by an mRNA vaccine. They also found that dosing intervals between eight and 12 weeks are safe and demonstrate a beneficial immune response, although a longer wait offers greater protection.

Quebec confirmed 182 new cases of COVID-19 and three new deaths on Saturday.

New Brunswick recorded another related death and seven new cases, but moved closer to its 75% vaccination target that would trigger the first phase of reopening in the province and create a bubble with other Atlantic provinces such as New Scotland, who experienced 10 new infections on Saturday.

In Nunavut, the territory has identified three new cases, including two people linked to Aqsarniit Middle School in Iqaluit. Parents, students and staff who have been identified through the search are being contacted, according to a statement posted on the site. the Government of Nunavut Facebook page.


What is happening in the world

The Johns Hopkins University COVID-19 case tracker on Saturday showed a total of more than 175.3 million reported cases worldwide. The death toll worldwide was over 3.7 million.

In the Americas, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro led a crowd of motorcycle supporters through the streets of Sao Paulo on Saturday and was fined for not wearing a mask.

PHOTOS | Brazilian President fined for not wearing a face mask during a motorcycle rally:

In Europe, Russia’s National Coronavirus Task Force reports that the number of new daily infections in the country has increased by almost half over the past week and more than doubled in Moscow.

In Asia, Saudi Arabia has said this year’s hajj pilgrimage will be limited to a maximum of 60,000 people, all from the kingdom, due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

In Africa, Kenya received a loan of US $ 750 million from the World Bank to support its budget and help East Africa’s economy recover from the effects of the pandemic, the multilateral lender said.





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Century Casinos Announces Reopening of Its Alberta Locations https://davidthompsonthings.com/century-casinos-announces-reopening-of-its-alberta-locations/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/century-casinos-announces-reopening-of-its-alberta-locations/#respond Sat, 12 Jun 2021 05:25:52 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/century-casinos-announces-reopening-of-its-alberta-locations/ Posted: Jun 11, 2021, 10:25 a.m. Last update on: June 11, 2021, 10:25 a.m. Steve bittenbender Read more Century Casinos has announced the reopening of its gaming properties in Alberta. A blackjack dealer at Century Casino St. Albert is ready to deal. The company announced Thursday that it is reopening its gaming facilities in Alberta […]]]>


Posted: Jun 11, 2021, 10:25 a.m.

Last update on: June 11, 2021, 10:25 a.m.

Century Casinos has announced the reopening of its gaming properties in Alberta.

Century Casinos Canada reopens
A blackjack dealer at Century Casino St. Albert is ready to deal. The company announced Thursday that it is reopening its gaming facilities in Alberta for the first time in six months, as COVID-19 restrictions have been relaxed in the Canadian province. (Image: Century Casino St. Albert / Facebook)

The casinos of the Colorado-based company in Western Canada are Century Casino & Hotel Edmonton, Century Casino St. Albert, Century Mile Racetrack and Casino, and Century Downs Racetrack and Casino.

All properties reopened Thursday as Alberta entered Phase 2 of its plan to reopen in 2021. This phase allows indoor entertainment and recreation facilities to reopen up to one-third of their capacity.

Century Casino St. Albert said Friday that its table games will remain open until 3 a.m. MT.

We haven’t been open for a while, so don’t hesitate to ask one of our dealers to walk you through a game, ”the casino posted on its Facebook page.

However, Century Casinos officials are somewhat cautious about the future as they have said there is no assurance that provincial leaders will not demand another shutdown.

The announcement comes nearly six months to the day that the Colorado-based company has had to close its casinos in the Western Province of Canada for the second time due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

It also comes nearly a year to the day when Alberta authorized the reopening of casinos for the first time after the early stages of COVID-19.

According to the Alberta COVID-19 website, officials hope to lift all restrictions by early next month.

2021 worse than 2020 so far

Unlike the United States, casino games in Canada did not have a robust 2021. In fact, this year has been worse for casinos across the country.

In April, Great Canadian Gaming Corp. announced the temporary closure of its two Nova Scotia casinos due to epidemics in the Atlantic province. This left the country with only one casino – Casino New Brunswick – open.

In some places, such as British Columbia, casinos have remained closed since the pandemic began 15 months ago. Other provinces have allowed casinos to reopen, but have closed them again as cases flare up.

While the United States has been able to distribute millions of doses of vaccines since the end of December, Canada has not had the same access because it depends on the United States for many medical supplies. This meant the country continued to see a steady stream of cases with little ability to stop the spread apart from the resumption and continued trade restrictions.

Other Canadian casinos to reopen soon

Alberta is not the only province looking to reopen casinos.

In Saskatchewan, SaskGaming announced that its Regina and Moose Jaw casinos will reopen on June 20.

Hours will be limited from 9 a.m. to 4 a.m. Central Regina Time. In Moose Jaw, the casino will operate from 9 a.m. to 2 a.m. CT.

In addition, only electronic games will be available as table games in Regina will remain closed. Every third machine will be available to play, and electronic roulette, three-card poker, blackjack and baccarat will be available.

Guests and employees will also undergo screenings before they can enter the premises. Casinos will also only have one entry and exit.

In British Columbia, where once again casinos have not reopened since the start of the pandemic, gaming facilities could reopen with limited capacity as early as July 1.

Elsewhere, it will likely take longer before casinos can reopen.

Ontario, Canada’s most populous province, began Stage 1 of its three-stage reopening plan on Friday. According to the province’s plans, it will take at least six weeks before the casinos can reopen under Stage 3.



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Cautious for a good reason? Why Prince Edward Island is opening up to tourists more slowly than its neighbors https://davidthompsonthings.com/cautious-for-a-good-reason-why-prince-edward-island-is-opening-up-to-tourists-more-slowly-than-its-neighbors/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/cautious-for-a-good-reason-why-prince-edward-island-is-opening-up-to-tourists-more-slowly-than-its-neighbors/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 14:04:22 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/cautious-for-a-good-reason-why-prince-edward-island-is-opening-up-to-tourists-more-slowly-than-its-neighbors/ The unveiling of plans to reopen the other Atlantic provinces has sparked some jealousy in the Prince Edward Island tourism industry. As of now, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador plan to welcome fully vaccinated tourists from across the country on July 1. If all goes well in Nova Scotia, that province could open to […]]]>


The unveiling of plans to reopen the other Atlantic provinces has sparked some jealousy in the Prince Edward Island tourism industry.

As of now, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador plan to welcome fully vaccinated tourists from across the country on July 1.

If all goes well in Nova Scotia, that province could open to vaccinated Canadians by mid-July.

Prince Edward Island, on the other hand, will not let regular tourists from outside the region visit until September, after peak tourist season. That is unless the deployment of the vaccine on the island accelerates considerably.

“I think it would be very difficult for us as an industry to just sit back and watch these provinces – if they manage to come out of it safely – have a better tourism year than we do,” Dan said. James, owner of Kindred Spirits Inn and Cottages. in Cavendish.

“It would be very difficult for us to watch this.”

So why is Prince Edward Island opening its borders more slowly than its Atlantic counterparts?

Capacity issues

When Prime Minister Dennis King was asked this question, he said, “Our ability here to deal with an epidemic is severely limited.

It is not clear whether the Prime Minister meant that the medical capacity in PEI. is MORE limited than in other Atlantic provinces that choose to open faster.

What is clear is that the Island’s health care system is strained.

As a spokesperson for Health PEI noted, there are shortages of nurses and physicians “at all levels”. On top of that, many of the staff we have are working in COVID-19 testing and vaccination clinics, “stretching resources further.”

PEI’s Chief Public Health Officer, Dr. Heather Morrison, is seen here getting her COVID-19 vaccine in early May. She wants 80% of islanders to be fully immunized before the province welcomes tourists from across Canada. (Kirk Pennell / CBC)

The fear of the Chief Public Health Officer of PEI : A massive influx of summer tourists to the island and a major COVID-19 outbreak could overwhelm this already stretched system.

“We are one of the most densely populated provinces in the country – and in the summer we usually have such a large number of people coming for a short time,” Dr Heather Morrison told CBC News Thursday.

“We don’t have a large number of hospitals in the province that we can refer patients to, if there is an outbreak of COVID-19.

“But also, how do we take care of other patients if we have a big epidemic with people in the hospital?”

As a rule, the people who come are healthy to begin with. So it would be an occasional thing that would happen unexpectedly while they are on vacation.-Corinne Rowswell

Health PEI recognizes that the demands that tourists typically place on the healthcare system are minimal.

While Prince Edward Island’s population doubles during the summer in a normal year, this only results in a 5-10% increase in emergency room visits. Once there, very few tourists end up needing hospital beds.

“Usually the people who come are healthy to begin with. So it would be an occasional thing that would happen unexpectedly while on vacation, ”said Corinne Rowswell, COO of Health PEI.

Corinne Rowswell, COO of Health PEI, says the Island’s health care system is designed for its people year round and is already overburdened. She says welcoming too many tourists would put more strain on the system and leave it less equipped to deal with an epidemic. (Steve Bruce / CBC)

What’s the risk?

So what would be the risk then of welcoming fully vaccinated tourists from across Canada, especially if they have to be tested on arrival? How likely are they to cause – or get caught up in – a COVID-19 outbreak?

CBC News: Compass Host Louise Martin asked Morrison this question in their regular interview segment on Thursday.

Morrison did not go into a risk assessment, instead focusing on the need to continue immunizing Islanders.

After 80% of them received two doses of the vaccine, at any time, Morrison said she would feel more comfortable welcoming tourists from outside the area.

“It’s actually more about making sure we protect the islanders with two doses of the vaccine. If we suddenly open up, and leave too early, we won’t have had a chance to protect people with it. two doses of vaccine, ”she said.

Businesses fear, health officials confident

Whatever the logic behind PEI’s slower plan to reopen, it has left seasonal businesses worried about the coming summer. Some fear their incomes will drop even lower than last year’s figures, which included Atlantic bubble tourists from the first week of July.

On the other hand, the island’s cautious approach makes healthcare workers approach the summer with more optimism.

“I’m pretty confident in our situation. I don’t expect a huge influx of COVID-19 into the emergency department,” said Mike MacDonald, the nurse manager of the QEH emergency department.

“They’re testing at the border. They’ve got tracking and contact tracing, and all of those things in place. And based on what we’ve seen over the last 16 months or so, we’ve done a great job. I am not concerned.

More from CBC PEI:



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