Atlantic Provinces – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 15:38:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidthompsonthings.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Atlantic Provinces – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ 32 32 Atlantic Canada needs to be stronger against the storms https://davidthompsonthings.com/atlantic-canada-needs-to-be-stronger-against-the-storms/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 10:02:08 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/atlantic-canada-needs-to-be-stronger-against-the-storms/ As Atlantic Canada works to clean up the devastation wrought by post-tropical storm Fiona, lessons learned from its brutal winds and waves should be used to protect the region from future storms, experts say. While much has been learned from previous storms to help the region better prepare for onslaughts like Fiona’s, Kevin Quigley, professor […]]]>

As Atlantic Canada works to clean up the devastation wrought by post-tropical storm Fiona, lessons learned from its brutal winds and waves should be used to protect the region from future storms, experts say.

While much has been learned from previous storms to help the region better prepare for onslaughts like Fiona’s, Kevin Quigley, professor of public policy and director of Dalhousie University’s MacEachen Institute, said more work had to be done.

“It’s hard to hold people to account in the midst of a crisis. The focus has to be on helping and rescuing people,” Quigley said. “But once that period is over, we need to have a deeper conversation about improving the response for next time.”

As one of the strongest storms on record on the East Coast, Fiona killed at least three as waves swept through homes in Newfoundland, gusty winds toppled trees and telephone poles and half a million people were left without electricity.

On Monday, the Army was deployed to Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, while a Navy ship was sent to carry out welfare checks in the remote communities in Newfoundland.

“We always compare ourselves to Juan,” Quigley said of the 2003 hurricane. “We’ve come a long way, but we have to commit to learning and improving for future storms.”

However, rather than simply comparing this storm response to previous ones, public authorities should anticipate future storms and the changing needs of the aging population, he said.

This is especially important because the storms will hit the Atlantic provinces harder than they have in the past, said Blair Greenan, a researcher with the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

Due to the local geology, he said, these provinces will face greater sea level rise than other parts of the country: while land in many coastal regions, such as the island of Vancouver, the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Hudson Bay, rise, attenuating under the effect of the rise of the oceans, the lands of Nova Scotia and parts of New Brunswick and Terre- Neuve are sinking, making every millimeter of storm surge worse.

“It’s a unique situation in Canada,” Greenan said. “Atlantic Canada is one of the most at-risk regions in Canada for sea level rise. Infrastructure planning is most important here.

Average sea levels in Halifax Harbor have risen about 30cm over the past century, according to tide gauge data, and are expected to rise between 40 and 100cm by 2100.

This means that low and high tides are higher than they were before, which sets a higher baseline for storms.

“The same storm coming through would break (a levee) when it wouldn’t have done 100 years ago,” Greenan said. “And that will only increase in the future.”

He and his colleagues have developed a tool called the Canadian Extreme Water Level Adaptation Tool that connects global climate science with local decision-making. The online tool lists more than 1,000 small craft harbors in Canada and projects sea level rise for each, taking into account geography and local circumstances.

“We provide tools with local level information so people can incorporate it into their decision-making,” Greenan said.

Fiona took several people to sea on the east coast of Canada. The body of a 73-year-old woman was found Sunday after being swept up from Port Aux Basques, Newfoundland. a day earlier, when a massive wave hit his house, The Canadian Press reports.

One approach governments should implement more broadly to protect people in the future is “managed retirement,” said Kate Sherren, a professor of environmental social sciences at Dalhousie University. The policy is to move homes away from coastlines, where they are vulnerable to destruction by storm surges, she said, adding that it includes regulations on how close the coast is to new buildings, but also that it moves back the existing dwellings.

It’s a tough sell in places where people have built or are building their dream homes with sea views, Sherren said. “People don’t really perceive the risk to be serious enough that it’s time to do something as serious as go where they like.”

Retreat would not be a fixed distance. In some cases, it may mean moving a house further on a property; in others, it might involve the government exchanging one resident’s coastal property with another inland.

Regulations aren’t in place right now and people are still building homes too close to water, Sherren said, adding that she’s even seen homes with foundations sitting in water. Despite the unpopularity of the new rules, construction must be prevented in such dangerous places.

Usually people become more supportive of the idea after a major storm like Fiona, Sherren said, and that “political window” provides an opportunity to make progress on managed retirement.

“Emotional attachment to where people live – we all struggle to cope with significant change in places we cherish, and we all need to empathize with that,” she said. declared. “But we also have to make difficult decisions. It would be better if we could do them together.

Despite the destruction at the weekend, there were improvements in the response compared to previous years, according to Quigley.

He was quick to praise Atlantic provincial governments for their efforts to educate the public before the storm hit. Since last Wednesday, local radio and television have been inundated with warnings to stock up on food and water so residents can shelter in place for 72 hours after the storm, he said.

Health centers have been set up at area recreation facilities to provide people with a place to dry off and warm up. Power companies have also improved, he said, with hundreds of workers put on hold to reconnect downed lines and restore power to homes and businesses.

“Emergency management is getting better and much more sophisticated,” Quigley said. “But it could still be better.”

Cell phone service was available in large swathes of the Atlantic provinces, he said, and intermittent elsewhere. While few people owned cell phones 19 years ago during Hurricane Juan, today virtually everyone depends on them for news, information and contact with others.

With the new addiction comes problems.

“You’re asking people to shelter in their homes and now they can’t get any information and they start making bad decisions,” Quigley said, noting there were reports of people driving in search of a cellular signal before the roads are cleared. live power lines.

“People shouldn’t do that.”

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Canadian military sent to help after storm Fiona hits Atlantic provinces https://davidthompsonthings.com/canadian-military-sent-to-help-after-storm-fiona-hits-atlantic-provinces/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 05:45:51 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/canadian-military-sent-to-help-after-storm-fiona-hits-atlantic-provinces/ Canadian troops are sent to help recover from the devastation caused by Storm Fiona, which swept away homes, ripped roofs off and knocked out power in the country’s Atlantic provinces. After rolling north from the Caribbean as a hurricane, Fiona landed before dawn Saturday as a post-tropical cyclone, hitting Nova Scotia, Prince Island- Edward, Newfoundland […]]]>

Canadian troops are sent to help recover from the devastation caused by Storm Fiona, which swept away homes, ripped roofs off and knocked out power in the country’s Atlantic provinces.

After rolling north from the Caribbean as a hurricane, Fiona landed before dawn Saturday as a post-tropical cyclone, hitting Nova Scotia, Prince Island- Edward, Newfoundland and Quebec with high winds, heavy rain and huge waves.

Defense Minister Anita Anand said on Saturday that troops would help remove fallen trees and other debris, restore transport links and do whatever else is necessary for as long as necessary. She did not specify how many soldiers would be deployed.

Fiona has been charged with at least five deaths in the Caribbean, but there have been no confirmed deaths or serious injuries in Canada. Police say a woman who may have been taken was missing in the town of Channel-Port Aux Basques on the south coast of Newfoundland.

Raging waves pounded Port Aux Basques and entire structures were swept into the sea.

“I see houses in the ocean. I see rubble floating everywhere. It is complete and total destruction. There’s an apartment that’s gone,” said Wreckhouse Press editor and townsman Rene J Roy.

Mr Roy estimated that between eight and twelve houses and buildings had been swept away by the sea, adding: “It’s quite terrifying.”

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police said the town of 4,000 was in a state of emergency with multiple electrical fires and residential flooding.

Fiona was one of the strongest storms to hit eastern Canada (Brian McInnis/The Canadian Press/AP)

“We are seeing devastating images coming out of Port aux Basques. PEI (Prince Edward Island) suffered storm damage the likes of which they had never seen. Cape Breton is also hard hit,” Trudeau said.

“There are people who see their homes destroyed, people who are very worried, we will be there for you.”

Halifax Mayor Mike Savage said the roof of an apartment building collapsed in Nova Scotia’s largest city and authorities moved 100 people to an evacuation center. He said there were no serious injuries.

Provincial officials said other apartment buildings suffered significant damage.

More than 415,000 Nova Scotia Power customers — about 80% of the province of nearly one million people — were affected by outages Saturday. More than 82,000 customers in the province of Prince Edward Island, or about 95%, also lost power, while NB Power in New Brunswick reported 44,329 were without power.

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PA Week in Pictures: Latin America and the Caribbean https://davidthompsonthings.com/pa-week-in-pictures-latin-america-and-the-caribbean/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 04:10:35 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/pa-week-in-pictures-latin-america-and-the-caribbean/ The home of Nelson Cirino stands with its roof torn off by the winds of Hurricane Fiona in Loiza, Puerto Rico, Sunday, Sept. 18, 2022. President Joe Biden said Thursday that the full force of the federal government stands ready to help Puerto Rico to recover from the devastation even as Bermuda and Atlantic Canada […]]]>

Job

September 16 – 22, 2022

This photo gallery highlights some of the most compelling images shot or published by Associated Press photographers in Latin America and the Caribbean. It was organized by AP photo editor Leslie Mazoch in Mexico City.

Follow AP Visual Journalism:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/apnews

AP Images on Twitter: http://twitter.com/AP_Images

AP Images Blog: http://apimagesblog.com

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Atlantic meteorologists monitor Hurricane Fiona heading north https://davidthompsonthings.com/atlantic-meteorologists-monitor-hurricane-fiona-heading-north/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 22:46:23 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/atlantic-meteorologists-monitor-hurricane-fiona-heading-north/ The Atlantic provinces could be hit hard this weekend by Fiona, which is currently a Category 3 hurricane. Although it’s too early to tell how severe the storm will be when it arrives, CBC meteorologist Jay Scotland said now is the time to start preparing. “It’s still far too early to predict potential rainfall, surge […]]]>

The Atlantic provinces could be hit hard this weekend by Fiona, which is currently a Category 3 hurricane.

Although it’s too early to tell how severe the storm will be when it arrives, CBC meteorologist Jay Scotland said now is the time to start preparing.

“It’s still far too early to predict potential rainfall, surge heights or wind peaks,” he said. “These impacts will be highly track dependent.

“That being said, with this storm that could arrive as a hurricane, [Prince Edward] Islanders should be prepared for an extended period of heavy rain and tropical storm force winds. »

Scotland suggests securing loose items, cleaning downspouts and storing essentials.

As things stand, the eye of the hurricane is expected to enter Canadian waters early Saturday morning AT and pass the eastern tip of Cape Breton around noon.

Fiona could arrive in Atlantic Canada early Saturday morning, but it’s too early to tell where the eye will strike and how strong the storm will be by then. (Jay Scotland/CBC)

The U.S.-based National Hurricane Center shows a fairly high likelihood of the Maritimes experiencing sustained tropical storm-force winds of 40 mph or more, “and that doesn’t account for potentially higher gusts,” said said Scotland.

“With trees still in full leaf, [we] must also be prepared for power outages. Finally, coastal and inland flooding are possible due to heavy rains, high water levels and breaking waves.”

Map showing western PEI.  which expects lower wind speeds than eastern PEI.
This graph shows the level of wind that various parts of Prince Edward Island could experience. (Jay Scotland/CBC)

The powerful hurricane has already caused extensive damage in the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico.

The National Hurricane Center expects Fiona to pass through Bermuda on Thursday afternoon before moving into Canadian waters on Friday.

The center’s forecast at 6 p.m. AT on Tuesday noted that the storm was over parts of the Turks and Caicos Islands and the southeastern Bahamas, and warned: “Strengthening is expected over the next two days.”

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Canadians honor Terry Fox’s memory as in-person races return this year https://davidthompsonthings.com/canadians-honor-terry-foxs-memory-as-in-person-races-return-this-year/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 19:36:51 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/canadians-honor-terry-foxs-memory-as-in-person-races-return-this-year/ By Creeson Agecoutay and Michael Lee Click here for updates on this story September 17, 2022 (TVC network) — More than four decades after Terry Fox inspired the nation, his enduring spirit lives on in a new generation. Across Canada, the annual Terry Fox Run to raise money for cancer research is returning to in-person […]]]>

By Creeson Agecoutay and Michael Lee

Click here for updates on this story

September 17, 2022 (TVC network) — More than four decades after Terry Fox inspired the nation, his enduring spirit lives on in a new generation. Across Canada, the annual Terry Fox Run to raise money for cancer research is returning to in-person events after taking place virtually for two years due to the COVID-19 pandemic. More than four million people are expected to participate this year, including 17-year-old Jorja Scott of Kincardine, Ont., located along the eastern shore of Lake Huron. “Yeah, it’s amazing what he did…I couldn’t even imagine,” Scott told CTV News. A year ago, Scott was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, the same bone cancer as Fox. She says she started feeling pain while playing sports, but it wasn’t until she started limping while walking that she decided to go to the hospital. Scott underwent surgery to get a new reconstructed knee and is undergoing 18 chemotherapy treatments. But through it all, she says she finds strength in Terry Fox. “He’s such a good influence to look up to during this time,” Scott said. On April 12, 1980, Fox began his run across Canada known as the Marathon of Hope. Starting in St. John’s, NL, he ran nearly 42 kilometers a day, morning to night, through the Atlantic Provinces, Quebec and Ontario, stopping in hundreds of cities, schools and towns along the way. On September 1, after 143 days and 5,373 kilometres, Fox was forced to stop outside of Thunder Bay, Ont., after cancer developed in his lungs. He died on June 28, 1981, at only 22 years old. Since then, over $850 million has been raised for cancer research through the annual Terry Fox Run. “I was lucky to have his brother here in my house. I had his niece in our house,” said Tim Duguay, a Terry Fox event planner in Port Williams, Nova Scotia, about 80 kilometers northwest of Halifax. Duguay plans to raise more than $2,000 by running 42 kilometers along Nova Scotia’s scenic Cape Split Trail — one kilometer for every year there has been a Terry Fox Run. “It’s such a rewarding journey when you get to that final finish line, and look above and just look at that view,” he said. “It’s my little space of happiness.”

Note: This content is subject to a strict local market embargo. If you share the same market as the contributor of this article, you cannot use it on any platform.

Matthew Talbotmatthew.talbot@bellmedia.ca

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BEHIND THE NUMBERS: Are Atlantic Canadians overconfident in online safety? https://davidthompsonthings.com/behind-the-numbers-are-atlantic-canadians-overconfident-in-online-safety/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 20:25:35 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/behind-the-numbers-are-atlantic-canadians-overconfident-in-online-safety/ The number of Atlantic Canadians working from home has increased dramatically during the pandemic. This has been accompanied by an increased reliance on the internet and an increase in online commerce. A change in online habits has led to the growth of a wide range of activities, as well as an increased reliance on social […]]]>

The number of Atlantic Canadians working from home has increased dramatically during the pandemic. This has been accompanied by an increased reliance on the internet and an increase in online commerce.

A change in online habits has led to the growth of a wide range of activities, as well as an increased reliance on social media as a key channel for communication and information gathering.

But these changing habits have also led to increased opportunities for cybercriminals and a strong growth in cybercrime. In fact, 2021 was a historic year for financial losses reported to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Center, with $379 million lost to scams and fraud, a 130% increase from 2020.

Our recent survey results showed that four in 10 Atlantic Canadians have been victims of online fraud in which someone posing as a legitimate representative of an organization asks them for personal information or ‘silver. A third (34%) have had an online account hacked or accessed by someone without permission, and three in 10 (28%) have had their personal information leaked due to an organization’s data breach. In total, nearly two-thirds of Atlantic Canadians (64%) have experienced at least one of the three.

Contributed – Contributed Image

In July, Newfoundland and Labrador’s largest health authority notified nearly 40,000 people that their privacy had been breached following a cyberattack last fall. Such attacks have been experienced by retailers, car dealerships and other businesses in our region.

According to the Insurance Bureau of Canada, three out of four businesses depend on their website to function, and one in five small businesses have been affected by a cyberattack or data breach. This is a serious consideration for businesses and consumers.

Despite this, our latest poll of over 1,500 Atlantic Canadians showed that most (64%) are confident that they know how to protect their personal information in online spaces, although many have been victims of fraud. Only three in 10 are not confident, although confidence levels decline with age.

The people we interviewed had varying levels of confidence in the ability of service providers to protect our personal information from online security breaches, depending on the type of organization. Atlantic Canadians trust financial institutions the most, followed by government, to keep their personal information safe online, but have limited trust in retailers or social media platforms.

Our results also show that trust varies across the region, with residents of Newfoundland and Labrador being less confident than those of other Atlantic provinces in the ability of financial institutions, governments and retailers to protect them, which may directly reflect health care information. breach.

Contributed - Contributed Image

For businesses, dedicating an appropriate budget to cybersecurity is essential, as is ensuring ongoing efforts to protect the data collected. Ongoing training from an expert IT organization is one way to ensure that employees are continually reminded of possible threats. A cyberattack is not only inconvenient and costly, it can pose a very serious threat to an organization. For businesses selling products through e-commerce or storing their customers’ electronic data, a systems breach or cyberattack can be devastating. Companies must continue to focus on the necessary measures to keep their data and customer information secure.

Despite all the ways the internet can help us, as consumers we need to be ever vigilant to protect ourselves online. There are a few basic steps to easily protect yourself, such as two-factor authentication, learning to recognize scams and threats, not sharing personal information, understanding how organizations protect your personal information, monitoring credit, avoiding to reuse passwords across multiple websites or services; and to avoid performing sensitive work or financial transactions over public Internet connections.

The results discussed come from a random telephone survey of 1,500 Atlantic Canadians aged 18 or older, conducted between Aug. 3 and Aug. 31. Results are accurate to within +/- 2.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

Margaret Brigley, CEO, and Margaret Chapman, COO, are business partners of Narrative Research, a national, nonpartisan market research firm based in Halifax.

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Yukon announces public sector holiday for Queen’s funeral; schools close, courts stay open – Yukon News https://davidthompsonthings.com/yukon-announces-public-sector-holiday-for-queens-funeral-schools-close-courts-stay-open-yukon-news/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 23:10:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/yukon-announces-public-sector-holiday-for-queens-funeral-schools-close-courts-stay-open-yukon-news/ The Yukon will join other jurisdictions across the country in marking a public holiday to observe the National Day of Mourning in honor of Queen Elizabeth II on September 19. The federal government has declared a federal holiday to mark the Queen’s funeral. Following the lead of the federal government, the Yukon government announced in […]]]>

The Yukon will join other jurisdictions across the country in marking a public holiday to observe the National Day of Mourning in honor of Queen Elizabeth II on September 19.

The federal government has declared a federal holiday to mark the Queen’s funeral. Following the lead of the federal government, the Yukon government announced in a Sept. 14 news release that it would be a one-time holiday for territorial public sector employees.

Public schools and other public services in the territory will be closed for the day, the government announced.

However, a joint opinion from the Yukon Supreme Court and the Yukon Territorial Court opposes the government’s decision.

The courts will remain open on September 19, according to the notice.

“The courts made this decision in recognition of the role of the courts in maintaining the administration of justice and ensuring access to justice,” the notice reads.

In an email to families of students and staff, the Department for Education acknowledged the short notice and apologized for any inconvenience caused to families, such as childcare for school-aged children. workers who have no day off.

The email says schools will make adjustments to their schedules to make up for lost teaching time.

“You will soon receive information from your school on how they have decided to adapt,” the email read.

The email also mentions the “complex but important relationship” between Indigenous peoples and the Crown and the “painful history of colonization” of Canada.

“We will continue to work with Yukon First Nations to ensure that all schools meet the needs of Yukon First Nations students and provide all students with the opportunity to experience the ways of knowing, doing and being. Yukon First Nations,” the email read.

The government statement suggests that the private sector is also taking part in the day of mourning in one way or another.

“Employers and organizations in the private sector and other levels of government are encouraged to observe the National Day of Mourning in a manner that is appropriate for their employees and their business,” the statement read.

In the statement, Prime Minister Sandy Silver said mourning the Queen was an important part of cherishing her legacy.

“We encourage all employers to recognize and reflect on the National Day of Mourning in a way that is appropriate for their employees,” he said.

“Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II led an exceptional life dedicated to public service and helping Canadians. On behalf of all Yukoners, I once again offer our condolences to all members of the Royal Family.

Several other jurisdictions, including British Columbia, the Atlantic provinces and Manitoba, have decided to close government offices.

Saskatchewan, Ontario, Alberta and Quebec will not recognize the holiday.

The Queen reigned for more than 70 years before her death on September 8 at the age of 96.

September 19 will mark the end of the official period of mourning.

— With Canadian Press files

Contact Dana Hatherly at dana.hatherly@yukon-news.com

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Natural gas will not lead Canada to a sustainable energy future https://davidthompsonthings.com/natural-gas-will-not-lead-canada-to-a-sustainable-energy-future/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 12:36:23 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/natural-gas-will-not-lead-canada-to-a-sustainable-energy-future/ The Canadian government took advantage of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and the withdrawal of Russian natural gas exports to justify the increase in natural gas production in Canada. Much of the infrastructure needed to produce and transport this liquefied natural gas (LNG) would, however, take years to developlocking Canada into an emissions trajectory incompatible with […]]]>

The Canadian government took advantage of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and the withdrawal of Russian natural gas exports to justify the increase in natural gas production in Canada. Much of the infrastructure needed to produce and transport this liquefied natural gas (LNG) would, however, take years to developlocking Canada into an emissions trajectory incompatible with the climate objective of 1.5 C.

How do decision makers talk about energy production alludes to governments’ plans for our transition from carbon-based energy sources like oil, coal and natural gas to renewables like wind, solar and geothermal. Stakeholders on both sides of the energy transition – fossil fuel companies and climate activists – are now fiercely competing to get them to use their preferred language.

Lately, the fossil fuel industry has begun to refer to natural gas as a “bridging fuel” or essential part of a low-carbon energy transition. Climatologists point out that natural gas bridges often lead nowhere. Dependence on natural gas can locking countries into fossil fuels, crowd out low-carbon technologies and stranding assets at risk — assets such as coal mines and hydrocarbon reserves that lose value as a result of energy transitions.

Our research sees this bridging narrative growing in Canada and making inroads in climate policy, and fossil fuel companies winning the battle over how we talk about natural gas expansion.

Deck Fuel Stories

There are at least two main narratives or frameworks of bridge fuel in Canada – each tied to a particular regional economic and political reality as well as the location of each region along its unique journey. decarbonization pathway.

The Turner Valley gas plant in Alberta is Western Canada’s premier natural gas processing and refining facility. Alberta is working to reduce emissions from the production and transportation of natural gas.
(Shutterstock)

First, Alberta’s emerging conventional bridge fuel framework recognizes that natural gas-fired electricity generation contributes to greenhouse gas emissions, but positions it as a lower carbon alternative to coal. The Government of Alberta opposes a managed transition away from oil and gas and prefers instead focuses on reducing emissions released during the production and transport of natural gas.

Second, the bridge fuel discourse in British Columbia emphasizes the argument that expanding LNG production and exports could reduce emissions abroad – what we call the “Overall Bridge Narrative”. The global bridge framework positions the province’s LNG industry as a way for other countries like China to reduce their dependence on coal.

The lifecycle of methane emissions — emissions from production to consumption — of natural gas could actually result in higher overall emissions throughout the life cycle. This framing also neglects the importance underestimation of methane emissions from LNG production in Canada (and bypasses BC’s position as Canada’s largest coal exporter).

But the global bridge narrative has been incredibly enduring in British Columbia, so much so that the Canadian LNG Alliance argues the fossil gas industry can even help meet BC’s climate goals.

However, increased production will instead increase emissions not accounted for in BC climate policy.

Uncertain place of natural gas in regional climate plans

On the other side of the country, the discourse on natural gas is more discreet.

Despite the situation in Newfoundland and Labrador continued offshore oil and gas production and New Brunswick petroleum refining industry, the Atlantic provinces are less confident about the benefits of transitioning from natural gas. Instead, they focus on home heating change heating oil and diesel fuel to alternative methods such as heat pumps, although natural gas has emerged as a potential substitute for coal-fired electricity.

An orange ship enters a harbor
An offshore supply vessel enters port from the offshore oil producing fields of St. John’s, NL. Other Atlantic provinces, such as New Brunswick, are less confident about the benefits of transitioning from natural gas.
(Shutterstock)

Other provinces like Manitoba that are less dependent on natural gas are also plan the energy transition without a natural gas bridge, while the Ontario bridge story positions natural gas primarily as an energy source for transportation and home heating.

The uncertain place of natural gas in regional climate plans affects the speed of future decarbonization in Canada and beyond.

Although oil and gas industry associations are powerful players, their economic interests are not always aligned with each other. And we see evidence of competing interests in the oil and gas industry in Canada. For example, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers has yet to embrace the transitional fuel framework, dubbing the idea of ​​natural gas as “destination fuel”.

Meanwhile, other industry associations such as the Canadian Gas Association are more open to a wider range of transportation and heating fuels, not just natural gas. Proponents of the fight against fossil fuels can take advantage of these tensions to challenge the idea of ​​natural gas as a transition or destination fuel.

Climate delay

Whereas traditional climate denial has fallen out of political favor in Canada, our research reveals that climatic delay is indeed present in political discussions.

Climate lagging recognizes that climate action is needed but hinders rapid change, justify minimal action. Our research finds that bridge narratives reinforce climate lag by reassuring citizens that decarbonization will happen in the future while building support for natural gas production underway today.

For many provinces, natural gas expansion offers an enticing solution to the pain of transitioning away from oil, a solution that says we can increase oil and gas production and decarbonize our electricity, transport and accommodation without any loss.

However, decarbonization will have real costs for oil-producing provinces and successful policymaking must address these impacts. in the front. Talking about real costs also means establishing credible commitments on the anticipated pace of energy transitions.

Narratives about bridge fuels keep us thinking about how long our decarbonization journey will take. An honest conversation about our energy future must include proven non-emitting technologies, such as increase wind, solar and geothermal production and build inter-provincial transmission lines rather than locking in our dependence on natural gas.

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AMTA appoints Hamel interim president, Nash becomes vice president https://davidthompsonthings.com/amta-appoints-hamel-interim-president-nash-becomes-vice-president/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 13:55:07 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/amta-appoints-hamel-interim-president-nash-becomes-vice-president/ Willie Hamel has been named Acting President of the Alberta Motor Transport Association (AMTA), while Chris Nash steps down to become Vice President – Industry Relations and Member Solutions. Announcing the move, the board said Nash’s newly created position will focus on aligning the association’s services with member needs and expanding the partnerships created through […]]]>

Willie Hamel has been named Acting President of the Alberta Motor Transport Association (AMTA), while Chris Nash steps down to become Vice President – Industry Relations and Member Solutions.

Announcing the move, the board said Nash’s newly created position will focus on aligning the association’s services with member needs and expanding the partnerships created through of a new strategic plan.

Willie Hamel (Photo: LinkedIn)

Hamel — a business consultant who served as chairman of the board from 2013 to 2018 — will oversee the day-to-day operations of the association. He was Vice President – ​​Operations at Trimac Transportation and Vice President of Diversified Transportation.

“These changes increase our capacity and strengthen our focus so that we can better seize the many opportunities our industry will face in the years to come,” said Board Chairman Jude Groves. “They will allow AMTA to meet member needs and pursue aligned opportunities as we grow our association, without blurring the focus on our mandate as a safety and advocacy organization.”

It is the third provincial trucking association to see changes in the leadership ranks in recent weeks.

Jordan Ewart left the Saskatchewan Trucking Association after serving as Director of Policy and Government Relations. The Atlantic Provinces Trucking Association has also begun the search for a new general manager with the departure of Jean-Marc Picard.

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Instead of bickering over seat allocation, make Parliament serve Canadians better https://davidthompsonthings.com/instead-of-bickering-over-seat-allocation-make-parliament-serve-canadians-better/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 20:00:17 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/instead-of-bickering-over-seat-allocation-make-parliament-serve-canadians-better/ Comment With a new census in the bag, Elections Canada unveiled its plan to redistribute parliamentary seats to a cheering national chorus of “it’s not fair to my region.” But do not worry. It’s also bad for democracy. The basic idea is that as some regions gain in population relative to others, they should get […]]]>

Comment

With a new census in the bag, Elections Canada unveiled its plan to redistribute parliamentary seats to a cheering national chorus of “it’s not fair to my region.” But do not worry. It’s also bad for democracy.

The basic idea is that as some regions gain in population relative to others, they should get more seats, except they shouldn’t. Quebec must never lose seats because it could take its marbles and go home, a vital principle of self-government. The Atlantic provinces must never lose seats because they send a lot of Liberals to Parliament, ditto. The West mustn’t grow because it’s full of truckers and other deplorable rednecks. And reporters already write “seat-rich Ontario” and “vote-rich Ontario” too often during elections. But everyone has to complain irritably all the time.

Canada also has strange constitutional rules that we cannot change, even if we do not adopt them today. Since no province can have fewer MPs than senators, Prince Edward Island has four MPs, one for every 41,920 people, while populous Ontario has about 116,000 to one. And there is a law of 1985 according to which no province can ever lose seats, quasi-constitutional because it favors Quebec.

Now, for starters, the simple expedient of adding parliamentary seats would allow us to achieve proportionality without diminishing anyone’s total number of seats. But should we?

As usual, you can’t decide how to achieve your goals until you understand what they are. Critics of unequal constituencies, like fanatics of proportional representation, often assume without question that the purpose of a legislature is to embody the popular will. But some of us cling to an older view that power corrupts, including voters, so the purpose of a Parliament, Congress, House of Assembly, etc. , is that the people we elect keep “the government” in check, traditionally the executive. but increasingly the judiciary. And it’s not clear that proportional representation, of total national votes or of equal-sized constituencies, helps us do that.

On the contrary, it tends to reinforce the “tyranny of the majority” via those politicians who are adept at creating the impression that “the people” support them. While the US Electoral College and two senators elected from many different states help ensure that legislative proposals must be acceptable to all sorts of ideological and sociological minorities.

I realize that things are not going well there at the moment. But in principle, the impossibility of imposing everything and anything by accumulating votes in key constituencies forces politicians to seek a broad consensus on important proposals. And because such a deal is rare, a lot of things just can’t be done, especially not in arrogant haste. Which limits the government.

The strange and wonderful evolution of the British Parliament had created an even more complex and eccentric constituency-by-constituency mix of everything from universal suffrage to ‘potwallopers’. Some universities had deputies. Some ridings had more than one. Dunwich had two for centuries after they were basically washed out to sea.

It was easy to ridicule, including the injustice of reactionary landowners appointing many deputies. And you would never create it out of thin air. But the successful attempt to expand and homogenize the franchise in the 19th century had unintended consequences. Well, not entirely unexpected. The “Iron Duke” opposed it, while novelist, commentator and MP Samuel Warren called the first reform law “the excellent bill to give everything to everyone.

I could argue that Britain had better government before these reforms. There were certainly far fewer. So while I doubt we are going to revive ‘rotten boroughs’ like Old Sarum, we may wonder how we would overhaul parliamentary seats if we wanted the legislature to be revitalized as a check on the executive. Which brings me back to the addition of MPs.

Here again, the populist mentality recedes. Boo. Down with the politicians. We want to elect people who will give us tips. Hence the vulgar “Less law on politicians” by Mike Harris. What was my line, why not just one? Why not elect a Napoleon III every four years?

Answer: Power tends to corrupt and absolute power tends to corrupt absolutely. We want lots of politicians so, as Madison said, ambition will curb ambition. Instead, in Canada today, we have too few legislators, so cheap apparatuses like bloated cabinets full of nonsensical “parliamentary secretaries” allow the executive to turn most legislators into dogs of pampered pocket (even if they are also harassed). In Britain, a Commons nearly double the size of ours is distinctly unruly. Ask Boris Johnson.

We should also give politicians higher pay and lower pensions, to reward performance rather than longevity. And create much larger budgets for staff, so they’re better informed and less harassed. Fewer voters per MP also encourages paying attention to each voter instead of just playing for your tribe locally and nationally. And if you care, it gives each jurisdiction plenty of MPs without creating injustice between or within provinces.

So we need a “Less Government by More Politicians Act”. Unless we like bickering unnecessarily.

The opinions expressed in this article are the opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of The Epoch Times.

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John Robson is a documentary filmmaker, columnist for the National Post, contributing editor of Dorchester Review and executive director of Climate Discussion Nexus. His most recent documentary is “The Environment: A True Story”.

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