The Prairie Provinces – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ Mon, 21 Jun 2021 20:53:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://davidthompsonthings.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png The Prairie Provinces – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ 32 32 A native man and a police dog died in an exchange of gunfire. The city honored the dog https://davidthompsonthings.com/a-native-man-and-a-police-dog-died-in-an-exchange-of-gunfire-the-city-honored-the-dog/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/a-native-man-and-a-police-dog-died-in-an-exchange-of-gunfire-the-city-honored-the-dog/#respond Mon, 21 Jun 2021 19:05:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/a-native-man-and-a-police-dog-died-in-an-exchange-of-gunfire-the-city-honored-the-dog/ A 29-year-old Aboriginal man and an RCMP police dog died after a two-day manhunt in northern Alberta. Photo via Wikimedia 29-year-old Indigenous man has died after a two-day manhunt in northern Alberta, but police refuse to say how, citing an active investigation by the province’s police watchdog . Canada Federal Police, RCMP and a nearby […]]]>


A 29-year-old Aboriginal man and an RCMP police dog died after a two-day manhunt in northern Alberta.  Photo via Wikimedia

A 29-year-old Aboriginal man and an RCMP police dog died after a two-day manhunt in northern Alberta. Photo via Wikimedia

29-year-old Indigenous man has died after a two-day manhunt in northern Alberta, but police refuse to say how, citing an active investigation by the province’s police watchdog .

Canada Federal Police, RCMP and a nearby town honor a police dog who died in the same incident, including putting flags at half mast and paying tribute on social media, but also don’t say how the dog was killed.

Police said on Thursday morning they attempted to stop a vehicle driven by Lionel Ernest Gray of Gift Lake Métis settlement entering Winagami Provincial Park four hours northwest of Edmonton. The driver was said to have started and then left on foot in a wooded area when the vehicle got stuck in the mud.

Police pursued the suspect along with the service dog, Jago, who they said was killed in a “shootout”. Police will not say whether the suspect shot the police, or whether it was the suspect or an officer who shot the dog.

The RCMP called in air services from Edmonton and Calgary, as well as the neighboring provinces of British Columbia and Saskatchewan, to assist in the search for Gray, who was arrested the next day at around noon. At a press conference Friday, the Chief Superintendent. Kevin Kunetzki said the man “had serious injuries at the time of his arrest” and died shortly after, as a result of police and EMS medical services.

He said Gray was wanted under pending warrants for “crimes against persons” but would not elaborate on what those crimes were. RCMP spokesman Fraser Logan told VICE World News on Monday that “crimes against people” can range from assault to homicide, but Gray was not wanted for manslaughter.

Logan said the RCMP cannot give further details as the Alberta Serious Incident Response Team (ASIRT) is investigating the incident. ASIRT, made up of police and civilian members, independently investigates incidents involving Alberta police officers that result in serious injury or death.

Court records show Gray had a trial scheduled to begin next year on five counts relating to an alleged sexual assault that allegedly took place in January 2020 in the Edmonton area.

Shortly after disclosing Grey’s death, the Alberta RCMP posted a tribute photo collage to the dog Jago on his Facebook page. The nearby town of High Prairie put its flags at half mast to honor the dog, which was handled by Cpl. Scott MacLeod.

High Prairie Mayor Brian Panasiuk said the city, which has lobbied for six years for a police dog and dog handler, “saw the dog’s death much like we would a human limb. of the RCMP “.

Some media reports have also focused heavily on the dog’s death. Global Calgary was slammed at social media for quoting police officers mourning the dog extensively in his story and for using the title “RCMP dog killed, man dead after police shootings in northern Alberta”.

In a separate incident that oddly resembled the High Prairie case, RCMP shot and killed a man and police dog in the Cold Lake area, about three hours northeast of Edmonton, on Sunday evening.

RCMP said in a statement Monday that they responded to an argument in a vehicle that led officers and a service dog to pursue the suspect, who fled on foot. Police said a “confrontation” took place, in which an officer fired a gun and the suspect was fatally injured. A police dog was injured and taken to a veterinarian with “non-life threatening injuries.”

An RCMP spokesperson said Monday they were not giving further details on Cold Lake’s death, as it is also under investigation by ASIRT.

No human police were injured in either incident.

Follow Kevin Maimann on Twitter.





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Cypress Hills Interprovincial Park – Maple Creek, Saskatchewan https://davidthompsonthings.com/cypress-hills-interprovincial-park-maple-creek-saskatchewan/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/cypress-hills-interprovincial-park-maple-creek-saskatchewan/#respond Sun, 20 Jun 2021 16:09:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/cypress-hills-interprovincial-park-maple-creek-saskatchewan/ About 10,000 years ago, the the world was in the throes of an ice age, the Wisconsin glaciation. Most of Canada and the northern border regions of the United States were covered with a huge sheet of ice. But because of the way mountain slopes directed the flow of ice, some areas were never covered […]]]>


About 10,000 years ago, the the world was in the throes of an ice age, the Wisconsin glaciation. Most of Canada and the northern border regions of the United States were covered with a huge sheet of ice. But because of the way mountain slopes directed the flow of ice, some areas were never covered with ice floes. They were islands of land surrounded by icy deserts, scientists nicknamed these oases “nunataks”, from the Inuit term. nunataq.

One of the best examples of nunatak is the Cypress Hills area in southeastern Alberta and southwestern Saskatchewan. One of the hills has the honor of being the highest point in Saskatchewan, 1,392 meters (4,567 feet). Covering approximately 2,500 square kilometers (965 square miles), the Cypress Hills were never fully covered during the Wisconsin glaciation, so the ground and vegetation were not scuffed by heavy rivers of ice. Today, the region’s many springs make it a different oasis. Its many mountain springs make it humid and humid while the ocean of prairie grass that surrounds it is made up of semi-arid plains.

This region is a revered place for many First Nations and Native American peoples. For at least 7,000 years, the hills held great spiritual significance and were used as shelter during the winter months. The hills and forests served as protection against the winter storms that ravaged the prairies.

As the settlers moved west, Cypress Hills became infamous when a band of American “wolfers” (professional wolf hunters) invaded Canada and slaughtered an Assiniboine camp. The Americans had lost their horses and were trying to find them when they came across a group of Assiniboine and their leader, Little Soldier. On June 1, 1873, the drunken wolves confront the Assiniboine, accusing them of stealing their horses. As they tried to negotiate, members of both sides were intoxicated and the situation worsened.

Wolves opened fire, wiping out all of Camp Assiniboine in what became the Cypress Hills Massacre. The event revealed how little control Canada had over its Wild West and formed the North West Mounted Police, the forerunners of the iconic Canadian Mounted Police. The area where the massacre took place was designated a national historic site of Canada in 1964.

The Cypress Hills area became an interprovincial park when the two provinces merged their adjacent parks to create Cypress Hills Provincial Park.



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Die-hard judiciary leader wins Iran presidency amid low turnout https://davidthompsonthings.com/die-hard-judiciary-leader-wins-iran-presidency-amid-low-turnout/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/die-hard-judiciary-leader-wins-iran-presidency-amid-low-turnout/#respond Sat, 19 Jun 2021 07:15:24 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/die-hard-judiciary-leader-wins-iran-presidency-amid-low-turnout/ Updated June 19, 2021 at 8:28 a.m. ET DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) – The Iranian justice chief won the country’s presidential election in a landslide victory on Saturday, propelling the supreme leader’s protege to Tehran’s highest civilian post in a vote which appeared to have the lowest turnout in the Islamic Republic. the story. […]]]>


Updated June 19, 2021 at 8:28 a.m. ET

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) – The Iranian justice chief won the country’s presidential election in a landslide victory on Saturday, propelling the supreme leader’s protege to Tehran’s highest civilian post in a vote which appeared to have the lowest turnout in the Islamic Republic. the story.

Early results showed Ebrahim Raisi won 17.8 million votes in the contest, eclipsing those of the race’s only moderate contender. However, Raisi only dominated the election after a panel led by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei disqualified his stronger competitor.

His candidacy, and the feeling that the election served as more of a crown for him, sparked widespread apathy among eligible voters in the Islamic Republic, which has maintained participation as a sign of support for the theocracy since its 1979 Islamic Revolution. Some, including former radical president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, have called for a boycott.

In the first results, former Revolutionary Guard commander Mohsen Rezaei won 3.3 million votes and moderate Abdolnasser Hemmati got 2.4 million, said Jamal Orf, head of the electoral headquarters of Iran’s ministry of the Interior. The fourth candidate in the race, Amirhossein Ghazizadeh Hashemi, got around 1 million votes, Orf said.

Hemmati offered his congratulations on Instagram to Raisi early on Saturday.

“I hope that your administration is a source of pride for the Islamic Republic of Iran, improves the economy and life with comfort and well-being for the great Iranian nation,” he wrote.

On Twitter, Rezaei congratulated Khamenei and the Iranian people for participating in the vote.

“God willing, the decisive election of my esteemed brother Ayatollah Dr. Seyyed Ebrahim Raisi promises the establishment of a strong and popular government to solve the country’s problems,” Rezaei wrote.

The swift concessions, while not unusual in previous Iranian elections, signaled what semi-official news agencies in Iran had been hinting at for hours: that the carefully controlled vote had been a resounding victory for Raisi in the midst of the elections. calls for boycott.

As night fell on Friday, the turnout appeared to be much lower than in the last Iranian presidential election in 2017. At a polling station inside a mosque in central Tehran, a Shiite cleric played ball. football with a young boy while most of his employees napped in a yard. In another, officials watched videos on their cellphones as state television screamed alongside them, offering only tight shots of locations across the country – as opposed to long election lines. past.

Voting ended at 2 a.m. on Saturday, after the government extended the vote to take account of what it called “overcrowding” at several polling stations nationwide. The paper ballots, crammed into large plastic boxes, were to be counted by hand overnight, and authorities said they expected to have the first results and turnout numbers by Saturday morning at the most. early.

“My vote will not change anything in this election, the number of people voting for Raisi is huge and Hemmati does not have the skills to do this,” said Hediyeh, a 25-year-old woman who gave only her first name. . by hurrying to take a taxi in Haft-e Tir Square after avoiding the ballot box. “I don’t have a candidate here.”

Iranian state television has sought to downplay turnout, singling out the Gulf Arab sheikhs around it and led by hereditary rulers, and low turnout in Western democracies. After a day of escalating authorities’ attempts to get the vote out, state television overnight aired scenes from crowded voting booths in several provinces, seeking to portray a last-minute rush to the polls.

But since the 1979 revolution toppled the shah, the Iranian theocracy has cited voter turnout as a sign of its legitimacy, starting with its first referendum which won 98.2% support and which simply asked if people wanted or not an Islamic Republic.

The disqualifications affected reformists and supporters of Rouhani, whose administration both struck the 2015 nuclear deal with world powers and saw it disintegrate three years later with America’s unilateral withdrawal. of the deal by then-President Donald Trump.

Voter apathy has also been fueled by the devastated state of the economy and a moderate campaign amid months of rising coronavirus cases. Poll workers wore gloves and masks, and some wiped the ballot boxes with disinfectants.

If elected, Raisi would be the first sitting Iranian president to be sanctioned by the US government even before taking office for his involvement in the mass execution of political prisoners in 1988, as well as for his tenure as head. of the internationally criticized Iranian justice system – one of the best executioners in the world.

It would also firmly put hard-line supporters in control across the government as negotiations in Vienna continue in an attempt to salvage a tattered deal meant to limit Iran’s nuclear program at a time when Tehran is enriching Iran. uranium at its highest level ever recorded, although it is still short. weapon quality levels. Tensions remain high with the United States and Israel, which reportedly carried out a series of attacks targeting Iranian nuclear sites and assassinated the scientist who created his military atomic program decades earlier.

Whoever wins will likely serve two four-year terms and therefore could lead what could be one of the most pivotal moments for the country in decades – the death of Khamenei, 82. Speculation has already started that Raisi could be a candidate for the post, along with Khamenei’s son, Mojtaba.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.



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Netherlands has no new cases of COVID-19 as 75% of eligible population received first dose of vaccine https://davidthompsonthings.com/netherlands-has-no-new-cases-of-covid-19-as-75-of-eligible-population-received-first-dose-of-vaccine/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/netherlands-has-no-new-cases-of-covid-19-as-75-of-eligible-population-received-first-dose-of-vaccine/#respond Fri, 18 Jun 2021 16:54:16 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/netherlands-has-no-new-cases-of-covid-19-as-75-of-eligible-population-received-first-dose-of-vaccine/ Newfoundland and Labrador reported no new cases of COVID-19 on Friday for the first time in nearly two months. There were 10 new recoveries, seven in the Central Health Region and three in the West Health Region. That brings the number of active cases in the province to 22, its lowest since April 22. The […]]]>


Newfoundland and Labrador reported no new cases of COVID-19 on Friday for the first time in nearly two months.

There were 10 new recoveries, seven in the Central Health Region and three in the West Health Region.

That brings the number of active cases in the province to 22, its lowest since April 22. The last time the province posted a zero for new cases was April 27.

Cluster investigation completed, outbreaks in Alberta workplaces

The health ministry says the investigation of the cluster of cases in the Central health region has been completed, without finding the source. A cluster investigation in the Western Health Region continues.

There are two COVID-19 outbreaks in Alberta workplaces affecting shift workers: Arc Resources, Grande Prairie and Suncor Firebag. Rotating workers on these projects who have returned to Newfoundland and Labrador in the past 14 days must self-isolate, distance themselves from household members and call 811 to arrange testing. Workers must also complete a full 14-day self-isolation period, regardless of test results.

Vaccination stage

According to government statistics, 75% of the province’s eligible population, that is, people 12 years of age and older, received a first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. That translates to 360,000 people getting a first shot.

This particular reference was cited as the one that had to be respected as part of the plan to reopen Newfoundland and Labrador. The province has said it will reopen to fully vaccinated Canadians without quarantine on July 1 as long as 75% of the eligible population has received at least one dose and the number of active COVID-19 cases remains low. The reopening would still need a formal green light from the Chief Medical Officer of Health.

It also depends on what’s going on across the country, Premier Andrew Furey said when announcing NL’s plan to reopen.

“A lot of this relies on who gets vaccinated here at home and those who come to our province,” Furey said. “If there are any concerns or potential issues with the appearance of variants or clusters, we will definitely consider changes.”

Everyone will have an appointment for the 2nd dose, according to the government

Appointments for second doses of the vaccine fill up as quickly as they open, as they are reported by reporters or by people who notice availability and post them on social media. Some people were quick to make their second immunization appointments, and the provincial government is assuring people that more slots will open on Monday as scheduled.

The move comes after the provincial government announced that all second-dose appointments booked for August 6 and beyond would be moved, due to an increase in vaccine supply.

As the mixing and pairing of the different vaccines were approved on Thursday evening, the National Advisory Committee on Immunization recommended that provinces stop administering the AstraZeneca-Oxford vaccine in most cases, even as boosters. for people who have received the first doses of the product.

NACI said Thursday that AstraZeneca recipients should instead receive a second dose of an mRNA vaccine, like those offered by Pfizer and Moderna.

Read more about CBC Newfoundland and Labrador





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Border towns frustrated as provinces reopen at different speeds https://davidthompsonthings.com/border-towns-frustrated-as-provinces-reopen-at-different-speeds/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/border-towns-frustrated-as-provinces-reopen-at-different-speeds/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 22:21:47 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/border-towns-frustrated-as-provinces-reopen-at-different-speeds/ Breadcrumb Links Saskatchewan Local News Despite more than 15,000 new injections, the goal of reopening Saskatchewan to 70% of adults with their first dose still remains elusive. Author of the article: Lynn giesbrecht A woman gets vaccinated at a pop-up COVID-19 vaccination clinic on Scarth Street in Regina, Saskatchewan on June 16, 2021. Photo by […]]]>


Despite more than 15,000 new injections, the goal of reopening Saskatchewan to 70% of adults with their first dose still remains elusive.

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With the Prairie provinces removing COVID-19 restrictions at different speeds, some border towns are finding themselves with frustrated residents.

In Flin Flon, which sits on the Saskatchewan-Manitoba border, Mayor Cal Huntley said navigating the COVID-19 restrictions was difficult.

The majority of residents and businesses are located in Manitoba and must adhere to Manitoba guidelines, but those on the Saskatchewan side follow Saskatchewan guidelines.

“The border is not our friend,” Huntley said. “Right now you can go to a restaurant in Saskatchewan and you can’t sit at a restaurant in Flin Flon, Manitoba because they are closed, which is a problem. The town of Creighton is less than two kilometers from Flin Flon, entirely on the Saskatchewan side, and follows that province’s guidelines.

Saskatchewan is set to enter Stage 2 of its plan to reopen on Sunday and aim to reach Stage 3 by July 11, removing virtually all restrictions, including mandatory masking.

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Manitoba, on the other hand, only recently announced its plan to reopen, which does not ease any restrictions until July 1. The province hopes to remove the vast majority of its restrictions by early September – a full eight weeks after Saskatchewan.

“It’s just hard to deal with frustrated people who see Manitoba’s 4-3-2-1 opening plan lagging behind Saskatchewan’s opening plan,” said Huntley.

“Their patience is running out. I encourage everyone in my area to be patient and caring. We will get by. “

Across the province is Lloydminster, which is split in two by the Alberta-Saskatchewan border. But Glenn Alford, the city’s senior director of public safety, said all of Lloydminster falls under Saskatchewan’s public health jurisdiction, as the city’s single charter dictates. This means that all residents of Lloydminster, even those on the Alberta side, must adhere to Saskatchewan guidelines.

While this creates more consistency for city leaders and local businesses, it doesn’t stop residents from jealously eyeing their faster neighbor to the west.

Alberta has already entered Stage 2 of its reopening and aims to remove the last of its restrictions by late June or early July, about two weeks ahead of Saskatchewan.

“I’m sure it might be a little frustrating for people to see our neighbors just to the west… have different rules,” Alford said, but he noted that most of the residents played well by playing by the rules. from Saskatchewan.

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“The vast majority of people have understood, and still do, and are working towards this goal of hopefully reopening in July. “

Saskatchewan distributed another 15,402 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine on Wednesday, but the province’s Stage 3 reopening benchmark – 70% of all adults with a first dose – still remains elusive.

Of the new doses, 12,404 were second doses, bringing the number of people fully vaccinated in the province to 239,760, or just over 23% of all eligible residents aged 12 and over.

That leaves just 2,998 doses given as first injections, as Saskatchewan remains stuck at 1% of the 70% needed to reach Stage 3, which would see most of the restrictions lifted. The final reopening step will be delayed until three weeks after the vaccination goal is reached.

Sixty-eight percent of people aged 12 and older have their first shot, approaching the 70 percent target required for the mask’s mandate to be lifted by July 11.

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Anyone 45 years of age and over – or anyone who received their first injection before May 1 – is now eligible for their second dose, as are all adults living in the northern Saskatchewan administrative district.

Saskatchewan also reported 94 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday. The additional 70 recoveries were not quite enough to balance the new cases, so active cases edged up to 752.

No new deaths were reported, but one death was removed from the tally.

“One person in the 80+ age group in Regina, previously listed as fatal, is now listed as resolved,” the province said in a press release. That drops the number of deaths from the pandemic in the province to 561.

There are currently 87 people hospitalized, nine of whom are in intensive care.

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lgiesbrecht@postmedia.com

News seems to fly to us faster all the time. From COVID-19 updates to politics and crime and everything in between, it can be hard to keep pace. With that in mind, the Regina Leader-Post has created an Afternoon Headlines newsletter that can be delivered to your inbox daily to make sure you’re up to date with the most important news of the day. Click here to subscribe.

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Native Prairie Appreciation Week a chance to enjoy the province’s unspoiled ecosystems https://davidthompsonthings.com/native-prairie-appreciation-week-a-chance-to-enjoy-the-provinces-unspoiled-ecosystems/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/native-prairie-appreciation-week-a-chance-to-enjoy-the-provinces-unspoiled-ecosystems/#respond Wed, 16 Jun 2021 22:59:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/native-prairie-appreciation-week-a-chance-to-enjoy-the-provinces-unspoiled-ecosystems/ Great diversity of untouched plants and wildlife to explore across the province With the amount of native prairie in Saskatchewan slowly decreasing from year to year, the opportunity to enjoy the views and scenes of unspoiled prairie is gradually diminishing. This is where Indigenous Grasslands Appreciation Week June 13-19 comes in: providing a chance to […]]]>


Great diversity of untouched plants and wildlife to explore across the province

With the amount of native prairie in Saskatchewan slowly decreasing from year to year, the opportunity to enjoy the views and scenes of unspoiled prairie is gradually diminishing.

This is where Indigenous Grasslands Appreciation Week June 13-19 comes in: providing a chance to appreciate the unique ecosystems and their crucial role in preserving the province’s biodiversity.

The Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan (SK PCAP) is helping a lot in this regard, working in coordination with the 33 different environmental organizations across the province to provide advice and collaboration while building awareness.

“This is the only week in North America dedicated to recognizing and celebrating the diversity and value of native grasslands, and it’s perfect for our province given the amount of grassland we have here.” , said Carolyn Gaudet, provincial director of PCAP.

Interestingly enough, it is estimated that only 13% of these grasslands are intact native grasslands, making it one of the most threatened ecosystems in the world.

Fortunately, the conservation of these lands is at the center of many organizations, with the aim of offering everyone the chance to see what the province looked like before it was colonized.

“People can still go to provincial parks and national parks, there are quite a few that still have native grasslands on them,” Gaudet said. “Then there are nonprofits that have native grasslands open to the public. The Nature Conservancy has properties within 40 minutes of Regina and Prince Albert, or you have the Meewasin Valley Authority which has quite a few native grasslands … it’s easy to find if you know where to look.

And what you will find is truly special.

Gaudet estimates that 70 different species of native grasses can be found in the province and that more than 200 species of birds live directly in the prairies or fly over during migration. That doesn’t even take into account the hundreds of wildlife that inhabit the open grasslands.

“This time of year is also perfect for wildflowers, if people follow our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/SKPCAP) we are posting a lot about it this week with pictures of it. must be sought, “said Gaudet.

In addition to their diversity and beauty, native grasslands also have practical advantages. Their extensive root systems prevent erosion during heavy rains as we saw last week, water is filtered through wetlands and their grasslands are the foundation of the sustainable livestock lifestyle, providing feed to the cattle and eventually to us.

“Our government recognizes the importance of native grasslands as part of a diverse ecosystem,” Agriculture Minister David Marit said in the press release announcing Native Grassland Appreciation Week. “Saskatchewan producers are stewards of the land and our ranching sector plays an important role in the conservation and management of rangelands around the province. The sustainable practices of our ranchers promote the ecological health of the native grassland ecosystem.

For more information on the province’s native grasslands – in addition to voting for your favorite native grassland photos as part of their week-long contest – be sure to visit their Facebook page at www.facebook .com / SKPCAP.



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The Nation of Quebec incorporated has the financial power…. The Nation of Alberta Has No Incorporated Alliance Equivalent – Part 2 https://davidthompsonthings.com/the-nation-of-quebec-incorporated-has-the-financial-power-the-nation-of-alberta-has-no-incorporated-alliance-equivalent-part-2/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/the-nation-of-quebec-incorporated-has-the-financial-power-the-nation-of-alberta-has-no-incorporated-alliance-equivalent-part-2/#respond Wed, 16 Jun 2021 07:25:44 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/the-nation-of-quebec-incorporated-has-the-financial-power-the-nation-of-alberta-has-no-incorporated-alliance-equivalent-part-2/ If the success of Quebec’s dairy and pork sectors are examples, Quebec Nation Incorporée (QNI) has served the interests of agricultural production and processing in Quebec rather well. I am talking about the alliance of investment entities of the Government of Quebec, Quebec insurance companies, banks, financial institutions, Quebec pension funds and giant producer cooperatives […]]]>


If the success of Quebec’s dairy and pork sectors are examples, Quebec Nation Incorporée (QNI) has served the interests of agricultural production and processing in Quebec rather well. I am talking about the alliance of investment entities of the Government of Quebec, Quebec insurance companies, banks, financial institutions, Quebec pension funds and giant producer cooperatives in Quebec. Two successful examples of this alliance are Olymel, the huge pork and poultry processor, and Agropur, the huge dairy processor. Both operate across Canada and abroad. Both got their start in Quebec, with what I’m suggesting is practical financial support from QNI for the sole reason that they were headquartered in Quebec; both belong to large cooperatives of Quebec producers. I suggest that other processors in Canada are financially disadvantaged simply because, as non-Quebec entities, they do not have access to financial support from QNI. I should say that some may be affected by QNI’s activity, generally as targets for takeovers by Quebec companies supported by QNI. Quebec Nation Incorporée, I suggest, has the full political support of Union Producteurs Agricoles (UPA), the powerful union of Quebec farmers. Membership in the UPA is compulsory and it is considered the leading group of agricultural producers in Canada when it comes to exercising formidable political power both in Quebec and in Ottawa. Such power invariably helps the QNI cause. I suspect that the Quebec government’s farm subsidy programs and regulatory regimes are all created with full cooperation, if not submission to the powerful UPA. It is a very powerful blend that supports Quebec agriculture like no other in Canada.
Alberta and the rest of the Prairie Provinces once had similar powerful producer co-operatives, such as the Wheat Pools, United Grain Growers, and the large dairy co-operatives. We also had one-stop-shop pork marketing boards in every province. All of them have been designed to maximize farm gate prices for growers and producers. The wheat pools, in particular, had commercial clout, owning thousands of elevators and giant sea terminals. Most have also looked at farm supply companies and other related businesses. These large cooperatives are now all gone, with the exception of the UFA supply cooperative, which has its own unique history. One would assume that if they and the hog boards had survived as they did in Quebec, we might have had the founding of an Alberta Nation Incorporated (ANI) in the provincial agricultural sector. I know the comparisons between the two provinces are not that relevant, but we should learn from QNI’s success in the Quebec and Canadian agricultural production and processing industries. But Alberta has no tangible equivalent to the QNI Economic Alliance, no big Alberta-based insurance companies or banks, no giant farmer co-ops, and no politically powerful and universal binding farmers / ranchers union. . But Alberta has a few QNI elements that could be tinkered with to counter the QNI ag juggernaut which has all the signs of getting bigger and more powerful not only in Quebec but across Canada.
Before suggesting what could be done to create an Alberta Nation Incorporated, I should note that some of this may already be happening or be developed by the province. If not pursued in some form or another, it would at least show a lack of insight. I learned a long time ago that governments initiate countless agricultural industry studies and economic analyzes of various sectors. But much of it is either put aside or faded into the mists of time as senior civil servants dissipate, wither or retire. For example, several years ago the Alberta Department of Agriculture did a comprehensive analysis of the livestock feedlot industry; it was not the first time, but in my memory it was not released, and one wonders what it revealed or suggested. The feedlot industry is quite large; it is an alberta success story created from insignificance 50 years ago to a multi-billion dollar industry. Two world-class beef packing plants were built as a result of this success. The feedlot and processing sectors were initiated by a strategic plan from the Lougheed government. All of this was supported by government grants, tax breaks and loan programs from the predecessor of the AFSC. Of course, that was another era, but what I mean is that what was done for the beef and veal industry in Alberta is what Quebec did for its dairy and pork sectors. . The difference is that Quebec, through QNI, continues to facilitate their expansion not only in Quebec but even in Alberta. I think we may have lost our vision of the agriculture industry in Alberta. More next time.
Will Verboven is an agricultural opinion writer and agricultural policy advisor.



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Poll: Almost 90% of Canadians Ready to Get Vaccinated https://davidthompsonthings.com/poll-almost-90-of-canadians-ready-to-get-vaccinated/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/poll-almost-90-of-canadians-ready-to-get-vaccinated/#respond Tue, 15 Jun 2021 11:14:32 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/poll-almost-90-of-canadians-ready-to-get-vaccinated/ Many Ontarians expressed frustration over their inability to reserve vaccinations on Monday after the province ramped up second doses in areas where the Delta variant is spreading. A new survey suggests that the apparent high demand for a COVID-19 vaccine exists across the country. the new data from the Angus Reid Institute suggests that nearly […]]]>


Many Ontarians expressed frustration over their inability to reserve vaccinations on Monday after the province ramped up second doses in areas where the Delta variant is spreading.

A new survey suggests that the apparent high demand for a COVID-19 vaccine exists across the country.

the new data from the Angus Reid Institute suggests that nearly 9 in 10 Canadians are now either vaccinated or willing to be vaccinated.

The number of people who are unsure of getting the vaccine, or who have said they want to wait, has fallen to the lowest level since Angus Reid began tracking the data last summer. Only 9 percent of Canadians still say they will not receive the vaccine under any circumstances.

Vaccine uncertainty remains highest in Alberta and Saskatchewan, the two prairie provinces have a reluctance rate (18%) that is almost double that of the rest of the country.


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Canada now leads all OECD countries as a percentage of the population with a first dose, but the country falls to 31st in two-dose coverage.

More than half of Canadians (57%) believe that priority should now be given equally to the first and second dose. About a quarter of respondents believe their province should continue to prioritize first doses – 16% say second doses should become priority.

Almost two in three Canadians now have one dose of the vaccine, but just over one in ten have both doses.

However, Canada is moving quickly to second doses, with 1.2 million people joining the fully vaccinated group in the past four days.

The rollout of the vaccine in the country was under intense scrutiny at first, but now more than half of those polled believe the federal government has done a good job of securing vaccine doses. Just over a quarter of respondents felt the same when asked the question in early March.

The country is preparing to receive more than 8 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine this week thanks to a massive infusion of snapshots from Moderna and a revised delivery schedule.

The federal government has said the Massachusetts-based pharmaceutical company will deliver a total of 5.8 million jabs in two separate shipments this week.



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New Federal Indigenous Languages ​​Commission essential to urgent work to revitalize Métis Nation languages https://davidthompsonthings.com/new-federal-indigenous-languages-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bcommission-essential-to-urgent-work-to-revitalize-metis-nation-languages/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/new-federal-indigenous-languages-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bcommission-essential-to-urgent-work-to-revitalize-metis-nation-languages/#respond Mon, 14 Jun 2021 20:07:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/new-federal-indigenous-languages-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bcommission-essential-to-urgent-work-to-revitalize-metis-nation-languages/ OTTAWA, ON, June 14, 2021 / CNW Telbec / – The Ralliement national des Métis (RNM) welcomes the appointment of the first commissioner and directors of the new Office of the Commissioner of Indigenous Languages. Today, the Federal Minister of Canadian Heritage Steven Guilbeault announced the appointment of Ronald E. Ignace as the first Indigenous […]]]>


OTTAWA, ON, June 14, 2021 / CNW Telbec / – The Ralliement national des Métis (RNM) welcomes the appointment of the first commissioner and directors of the new Office of the Commissioner of Indigenous Languages.

Today, the Federal Minister of Canadian Heritage Steven Guilbeault announced the appointment of Ronald E. Ignace as the first Indigenous Languages ​​Commissioner, and Robert watt, Georgina Liberty, and Joan Greyeyes as first directors.

Clara Morin Dal Col, Métis National Council Minister of Heritage, Culture and Families, said, “The Métis Nation looks forward to working with the Commissioner and Directors. We are particularly pleased with the appointment of Georgina Liberty as one of the three directors. It is very important to the Métis Nation that the leadership of the Office of the Commissioner of Indigenous Languages ​​includes a citizen with first-hand experience of our nation’s unique linguistic and cultural needs. Georgina Liberty is well placed to play this important role. “

Georgina Liberty is a Métis Nation citizen who has been a leader in the protection, revitalization and promotion of the Michif language. Ms. Liberty has been an active member of the Manitoba Metis Federation since 1969 and has many years of governance and political experience. She was director of Métis Nation 2020 and Manitoba 150 for the Métis National Council, which marked from Manitoba 150e anniversary and the historic role of Louis riel while bringing Manitoba in Confederation.

The commissioner and directors are appointed by the federal government but will work independently. The Office of the Commissioner of Indigenous Languages ​​aims to support Indigenous language practitioners and ensure that the federal government meets its commitments under the 2019 Indigenous Languages ​​Act.

RNM President Clément Chartier said, “Our national language, Michif, is critically endangered, as are some of the other Indigenous languages ​​spoken by our citizens. The next few years will be crucial in increasing the number of fluent speakers so that Michif can continue to be a living language. I am pleased that the new Office is in the hands of people who appreciate this urgency and who have the skills and expertise to support the vital work of protecting and revitalizing the language.

The RNM represents the Métis nation in Canada at national and international levels. The homeland of the Métis nation includes the three prairie provinces and extends to contiguous parts of British Columbia, Ontario, the Northwest Territories and United States. There are approximately 400,000 Métis Nation citizens in Canada, about a quarter of all indigenous peoples in the country.

SOURCE Métis National Council

For further information: Ke Ning, Métis National Council, [email protected], c: 613-297-5193

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www.metisnation.ca



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Edmonton Mayor Don Iveson “could be persuaded” to run for federal Liberals in Edmonton Center, some Alberta insiders say https://davidthompsonthings.com/edmonton-mayor-don-iveson-could-be-persuaded-to-run-for-federal-liberals-in-edmonton-center-some-alberta-insiders-say/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/edmonton-mayor-don-iveson-could-be-persuaded-to-run-for-federal-liberals-in-edmonton-center-some-alberta-insiders-say/#respond Mon, 14 Jun 2021 04:00:25 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/edmonton-mayor-don-iveson-could-be-persuaded-to-run-for-federal-liberals-in-edmonton-center-some-alberta-insiders-say/ Justin Trudeau’s Liberals are courting outgoing Edmonton mayor Don Iveson to be their candidate in Edmonton Center, according to political insiders, but former Liberal MP Randy Boissonnault is also preparing a campaign to try to reclaim the party banner in the riding, if the Liberals will let it. Mr. Boissonnault represented Edmonton Center from 2015 […]]]>


Justin Trudeau’s Liberals are courting outgoing Edmonton mayor Don Iveson to be their candidate in Edmonton Center, according to political insiders, but former Liberal MP Randy Boissonnault is also preparing a campaign to try to reclaim the party banner in the riding, if the Liberals will let it.

Mr. Boissonnault represented Edmonton Center from 2015 to 2019 and was Mr. Trudeau’s special advisor on LGBTQ issues. It is not known whether the Liberal Party will allow a competitive nomination contest in Edmonton Center or nominate its preferred candidate. A spokesperson for the Liberal Party would not say when contacted by The times of the hills.

“Every day the Liberal Party of Canada is approached by a multitude of talented community leaders interested in running as new Liberal candidates – and while we do not comment on the details of individual nominations, we stand ready to elect even more community leaders. talented, diverse and hardworking within our Liberal team, including in Edmonton Center and across Alberta, ”said Matteo Rossi, Manager, Media Relations and Communications Projects, in his email.

There is much speculation that an election will be called in the coming months, fueled in part by the recent decision of the federal Liberal Party to trigger the “electoral emergency” clause in the party constitution. This clause allows campaign co-chairs to change the nomination rules as they see fit to speed up the nomination process in the run-up to elections.

After eight years as mayor of Alberta’s second largest city, Canada’s fifth largest, Mr. Iveson announced in November that he would not run for a third term in the October 18 municipal election.

Mr. Iveson was also an Edmonton city councilor from 2007 to 2013.

He did not respond to interview requests from The times of the hills.

Today, former Liberal Minister Amarjeet Sohi is one of many candidates running to succeed Mr Iveson for the city’s top political post.

Trudeau’s Liberals have started trying to recruit Mr. Iveson to run for the Liberals in the Edmonton area ahead of the 2019 election, according to a leading Liberal source. The times of the hills agreed not to identify the source so that they could speak frankly without fear of retaliation within the party.

Mr. Iveson did not accept the Liberals’ offer in 2019. At the time, he was halfway through his second term as mayor, and the Liberals were extremely unpopular on the Prairies.

In 2019, the Trudeau Liberals lost the five Prairie seats – four in Alberta and one in Saskatchewan – they won in 2015. The Conservatives won all but one seat in the last election in the two Prairie provinces. . The only exception was Edmonton Strathcona, which the NDP has held since 2008.

Now Mr. Iveson is close to completing his second term as mayor and the Liberal Party is more popular in Alberta than it was in 2019, while the Federal Conservative Party of Erin O’Toole and Prime Minister Jason Kenney’s United Conservative Party are less popular than they have been. historically has been the case for conservative parties in Alberta.

An Angus Reid online poll released last week suggests the UCP is 11 points behind the provincial NDP. The 4,948 Angus Reid poll was conducted between June 2 and 7 and had a margin of error of plus or minus four percentage points.

Among the federal parties, a Léger poll last week found that the Conservative Party had the support of 53% of Canadians in Alberta, the NDP 26%, the Liberal Party 16% and the Green Party 3%. The poll of 1,539 Canadians was conducted between June 4 and June 6 and had a margin of error of plus or minus 2.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

In the 2019 election, the Conservatives won 69% of the vote in Alberta, the Liberals 13.8%, the NDP 11.6% and the Greens 2.8%.

The government in the throes of Mr. Kenney’s gaffing has been mired in controversy after controversy for months. Mr. O’Toole is unpopular among grassroots members of the party in Alberta because of his recently announced carbon tax policy and his pivot to the political center, a contrast to the conservative “really blue” brand he sees. built during last year’s leadership. election.

Now, the unpopularity of Mr. O’Toole and Mr. Kenney in Alberta should boost the Liberal Party’s electoral fortunes in the province.

Former Deputy Prime Minister Anne McLellan represented the riding of Edmonton Center from 1993 to 2006. Hill Times archival photography

“[Don] Iveson, it looks like he could be persuaded, ”said Professor Duane Bratt, professor of political science at Mount Royal University in Calgary.

“There are still a lot of rumors that Don Iveson is going to run for the federal level.”

Trudeau’s Liberals must win 13 more seats and retain the 157 seats they held in 2019 to reach the 170-seat threshold required for a majority government out of 338 in the House of Commons. Edmonton Center is one of the ridings they are targeting in the next election.

In the red wave that won an overwhelming majority for the Liberals in 2015, Mr. Boissonnault won Edmonton Center by a margin of 1,199 votes, or 2.2 percentage points. He won 37.1 percent of the vote, while second Tory James Cumming won 34.9 percent, NDP’s Gil McGowan 24.4 percent and Green Party candidate David Parker 2.6 percent of the vote. voice.

In 2019, Mr. Cummings beat Mr. Boissonnault by an 8.4% margin of the vote. The rookie Conservative MP won 41.4 percent of the vote and Mr. Boissonnault only got 33 percent of the vote. NDP’s Katherine Swampy won 20.6 percent of the vote and Green candidate Grad Murray won 2.6 percent of the vote.

Mr. Boissonnault declined to be interviewed for this article and referred all questions to party headquarters.

Before Mr. Boissonnault, former Deputy Prime Minister Anne McLellan represented Edmonton Center between 1993 and 2006, when she lost to Conservative MP Laurie Hawn.

Some political insiders call the city of Edmonton “Red Edmonton” because, unlike the rest of the province, the city tends to support center-left parties at the federal and provincial levels. Although the federal Liberals have not had good election results in Alberta since the 1960s, they still managed to win some seats in the Edmonton area.

In 1993, the Liberals elected four MPs in the city and they each won two seats in the 1997, 2000 and 2004 elections. In 2006, 2008 and 2011, the Liberals were unable to elect any MPs in the city.

Provincially, NDP Leader Rachel Notley is from Edmonton and the city is known as a key stronghold of support for the New Democrats.

Alberta political insiders interviewed for this article said the Liberals could win Edmonton Center in the current political environment, in which, along with the provincial and federal Conservatives, the Conservatives are struggling to retain their core supporters. Some have said that the Liberals had a better chance of winning this riding with Mr. Iveson than with Mr. Boissonnault, because of the profile of the current mayor and his popularity in the city.

“If I had to pick the one that would have the most benefits, I would think it would be Iveson,” Professor Bratt said.

“Because you have a lot more stature and weight as mayor than a simple backbench MP like Randy Boissonnault was,” he said.

Mr. Kenney’s unpopularity as a provincial Conservative politician could affect federal politics in the city, he said, adding, “O’Toole is not particularly popular here either.”

“Edmonton Center, the Liberals have won in the past. So I think they might win again and that’s why there are still a lot of rumors that Don Iveson is going to run at the federal level. “

Stephen Carter, an Alberta-based political strategist, echoed this view.

“Don Iveson has very close ties to this region,” Carter said. “He was a very popular mayor who probably could have won a third term. So I think he would win, if [he] was in. “

Ipsos CEO Darrell Bricker says the Liberals have already won the Edmonton Center riding and can win it again with the right candidate. Hill Times photograph by Andrew Meade

The main liberal said The times of the hills that regardless of who the Liberal candidate is, Edmonton Center, like other ridings in Alberta, will be a tough riding for the party to win.

The source said the Liberals have a better chance of winning Edmonton Center than any other riding in Alberta because it is a downtown riding and the party has won it several times.

The source said a lot depends on the timing of the next election. UCP Premier Jason Kenney’s struggles support provincial New Democrats, and that could boost the federal NDP in the next election. Votes for the NDP have divided the left-wing riding the federal Liberals rely on for success.

The source said the support the provincial and federal Conservatives are losing goes to the more right-wing parties, or the NDP, not the Trudeau Liberals.

Federal Conservatives are losing the support of rural Alberta ridings over Mr. O’Toole’s carbon tax — and much of that support goes to the Maverick Party — but not necessarily losing support on this issue in urban ridings in Alberta, such as Edmonton Center, the source said.

“The crucial question is: will the Liberals be able to steal votes from the NDP? Said the source.

“It’s the only way to win. At the moment, the answer is no. “

Ipsos Public Affairs pollster Darrell Bricker said the Liberals have already won Edmonton Center and can win it again. But he declined to say whether the Liberals had a better chance of winning with Mr. Iveson or Mr. Boissonnault, and he did not do any polling in the riding.

“They’re running in Red Edmonton, as we like to call it, and progressive candidates tend to do a little better. [there than in the rest of the province]Said Mr. Bricker.

“There is mostly a progressive vote in Edmonton. If there’s a place in Alberta where the Liberals have a good chance of getting seats, and if they run with Don Iveson, he’s got a lot of notoriety, he’s stepping down in pretty high regard, he really would. a serious candidate. “

The times of the hills



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