The Prairie Provinces – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 16:19:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidthompsonthings.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png The Prairie Provinces – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ 32 32 HAL’S HEADLINES: Manitoba Needs a Seniors Advocate https://davidthompsonthings.com/hals-headlines-manitoba-needs-a-seniors-advocate/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 16:19:39 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/hals-headlines-manitoba-needs-a-seniors-advocate/ Content of the article Manitoba should follow the lead of other provinces and establish a Seniors Advocate. Especially after news this week that two nursing aides have been placed on paid leave after allegations of abuse at a Winnipeg care home. Whistleblowers came forward as early as February to say things were happening at Extendicare’s […]]]>

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Manitoba should follow the lead of other provinces and establish a Seniors Advocate. Especially after news this week that two nursing aides have been placed on paid leave after allegations of abuse at a Winnipeg care home. Whistleblowers came forward as early as February to say things were happening at Extendicare’s Oakview Place that shouldn’t be happening. The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority and Winnipeg Police are investigating. And then there’s also what happened in some of those homes during the pandemic. We need to protect our senior citizens, because so much of what we have is thanks to them. I agree with NDP Leader Wab Kinew when he says we need someone to hear the complaints of seniors and then fight for them.

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POLLOCK AT 100 YEARS

Happy birthday to Pollock Hardware who turns 100 this weekend. It opened in 1922 at 1407-Main Street and for 85 years supplied the community with general hardware and household items. It closed in 2007 when Wayne and Lois Cash retired after being unable to find a buyer for the business. That might have been the case for Pollock, but the community reopened the store as a co-op that continues to operate to this day. Congratulation on a good run and here are another 100 years!

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PRIDE OF THE PRAIRIES

With Canada Day less than a week away, I thought I’d share with you a great way to celebrate the country’s birthday while preserving some of its history. Red Bomb Fireworks sells a fireworks kit called Prairie Pride with a portion of the proceeds going towards preserving agricultural history. This year the money will be used to relocate and preserve the Grain Officer’s office at Tyndall Elevator which was recently demolished. It is transferred to the Pioneer Village Museum in Beauséjour. You can find out more about the kit at RedBomb.com.

Content of the article

Red Bomb Fireworks is raising funds to relocate and preserve the Tyndall Elevator Grain Agent’s office. Photo by Matt Bialek Photo by Matt Bialek Photo /Winnipeg Sun
Red Bomb Fireworks is raising funds to relocate and preserve the Tyndall Elevator Grain Agent's office.  Photo by Matt Bialek
Red Bomb Fireworks is raising funds to relocate and preserve the Tyndall Elevator Grain Agent’s office. Photo by Matt Bialek Photo by Matt Bialek Photo /Winnipeg Sun

A HEALTHY BALANCE

A better balance can be the key to a longer life. Middle-aged people who cannot stand on one leg for 10 seconds are almost twice as likely to die within a decade. Brazilian scientists say the simple balance test should be part of an older person’s regular checkups. Experts say the balance remains fairly stable until we are in our 50s, then it begins to decline rapidly.

Buckle up

The pandemic has heightened road anxiety. In fact, two-thirds feel more anxious in cars today than before COVID-19. A new survey of 2,000 people also reveals that 63% of people in relationships admit they get nervous when their partner drives.

MATE MATING

Tiny eight-legged creatures have sex on your face while you sleep at night, according to new research. The University of Reading in the UK says these mites are invisible to the naked eye, but live on the skin of all humans. And in the eerie swinging version of the bug world, the mites cling to our hair as they copulate. By the way, the number of mites on our body increases as we age as our pores get bigger.

“Hal wrote columns for years. He also hosts Connecting Winnipeg weekday mornings from 10 a.m. to noon at 680 CJOB. You can email him at Hal@HalAnderson.ca.

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Interest in electric vehicles in Canada climbs to 46%, survey finds https://davidthompsonthings.com/interest-in-electric-vehicles-in-canada-climbs-to-46-survey-finds/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 02:39:18 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/interest-in-electric-vehicles-in-canada-climbs-to-46-survey-finds/ The number of Canadians looking to buy electric vehicles in 2022 has reached its highest level yet, with British Columbia leading the way, according to a new survey from professional services firm Ernst & Young Global Limited. Nearly half of Canadians say they are considering buying an electric car as concerns about cost, range and […]]]>

The number of Canadians looking to buy electric vehicles in 2022 has reached its highest level yet, with British Columbia leading the way, according to a new survey from professional services firm Ernst & Young Global Limited.

Nearly half of Canadians say they are considering buying an electric car as concerns about cost, range and charging capacity continue to decline.

That’s according to a recent survey by international professional services firm Ernst & Young Global Limited.

According to its May 2022 Mobility Consumer Index, the number of Canadians looking to buy an electric vehicle (EV) has jumped to 46%, up 11% from 2021.

“These findings mark a turning point in the automotive buying market,” said Jennifer Rogers, automotive leader for Ernst & Young Canada, in a prepared statement. “Despite the decline in consumer travel over the past two years, preferences for car ownership – especially electric vehicles – are strengthening.”

Although this is six percentage points lower than the global average of 52%, it is significantly higher than in the United States, where only 29% of respondents said they were ready to buy an electric vehicle. , or Australia, where 38% said the time was up. come.

Italy, Spain and Norway in Europe, as well as China, South Korea and Singapore in Asia led consumer appetite for electric vehicles, according to the study.

The poll comes as many Canadians continue to return to workplaces across the country, although Ernst & Young researchers found that commuting to work in Canada remained 30% below levels of before the pandemic, more than double the average of the countries surveyed.

Part of the growing interest in electric vehicles is due to the disappearance of concerns about cost. The poll found that 38% of Canadians are worried about the upfront cost of an electric vehicle, up from 66% in 2021.

Nearly 40% of Canadian respondents cited the environment as the top factor influencing their decision to consider purchasing an electric vehicle.

However, the availability of charging stations remains an obstacle for 36% of respondents.

Yet eight in 10 said they were willing to pay more to get the electric vehicle they wanted, while nearly two-thirds said they would pay 20% more than an internal combustion vehicle.

From province to province, the survey revealed significant regional gaps in who is willing to buy an EV.

British Columbians were the most likely to express interest in buying an EV, with 54% saying they were considering it. The lowest interest was reported in the Prairie provinces, where only 25% of respondents said they were considering an EV.

The study surveyed approximately 13,000 people worldwide, including 1,000 in Canada.

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An Indigenous cultural resurgence in Canada https://davidthompsonthings.com/an-indigenous-cultural-resurgence-in-canada/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 03:55:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/an-indigenous-cultural-resurgence-in-canada/ National Indigenous Peoples Day is a day to honor the rich, vital and diverse cultures of Canada‘s First Nations, Inuit and Métis. The summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, June 21, was chosen because many Indigenous peoples observe the longest day of the year as part of their cultural traditions. Launched in 1982 and originally […]]]>

National Indigenous Peoples Day is a day to honor the rich, vital and diverse cultures of Canada‘s First Nations, Inuit and Métis.

The summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, June 21, was chosen because many Indigenous peoples observe the longest day of the year as part of their cultural traditions.

Launched in 1982 and originally called National Aboriginal Day, it was not officially proclaimed by the Government of Canada until 1996, recognizing the contributions that Aboriginal peoples have made to our country.

Indigenous peoples, estimated to number 40 million in North America before the arrival of Europeans, suffered a drastic decline after the arrival of Europeans, due to the introduction of diseases.

But they are now the fastest growing segment of the population in Canada. With this growth comes new vitality and prosperity, although many Aboriginal people still live in extreme poverty on isolated reserves and in marginalized areas of Canada’s urban centers.

However, the resurgence of Indigenous pride – as seen in the arts and television shows – reveals the renewed sense of identity Indigenous peoples are creating for themselves and others.

Along with this renewed pride are negotiations in the form of modern treaties and assertions of sovereignty over their homelands, such as the Gitxsan-Wet’suwet’en claim in northwestern British Columbia.

The Aboriginal peoples of today are the descendants of the original inhabitants of Canada. The Canadian Constitution Act, 1982 recognizes three groups of Aboriginal people. There are more than 1.7 million people in Canada who identify as Indigenous, meaning First Nations, Inuit and Métis.

First Nations is the term that many native people in Canada prefer to be called. First Nations people include status and non-status “Indians” as they are still covered by the Indian Act.

The term First Nation is synonymous with an Indian band or reserve with status; thus, many groups have abandoned the term Indian band in favor of First Nation.

However, in recent years, many First Nations have reclaimed their own names, such as Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc, which replaced “Kamloops Indian Band”.

There are approximately 3,100 reserves divided among 619 First Nations in Canada.

The Inuit are arctic people who are the indigenous inhabitants of northern Canada. They have lived along the coasts of northern Canada for several thousand years.

In 1999, Nunavut was created. It is a territory that has allowed Inuit decision-making power over its development, as well as compensation for rights that have been historically and unintentionally extinguished or abandoned by various government policies.

The name Métis does not encompass all people with mixed Indian and European heritage; rather, it refers to distinctive peoples who, in addition to their mixed ancestry, have developed their own customs, way of life, and recognizable group identity. Originally, the Métis inhabited the three prairie provinces of Canada, as well as parts of Ontario.

Although not classified as “Indians” under the Indian Act, these descendants of French or British fur traders and Aboriginal women played a major role in the struggle for recognition of their Aboriginal rights.

The most famous Métis was Louis Riel (1844-1885), leader of the Red River Rebellion and the North-West Rebellion. In the fight for their own Métis territory and government, Riel was tried and hanged for what the Canadian government at the time considered treason.

Indigenous peoples have lived in what is now Canada since time immemorial, that is, for an indefinite period of time.

In British Columbia, the oldest traces of its original inhabitants date back more than 13,500 years. In the Yukon, remains over 24,000 years old have been found where the last glaciation did not erase the evidence.

The First Peoples of Canada have had to deal with newcomers to their ancestral lands since the arrival of Europeans at the end of the 15th century.

Wars were fought against the “Indians” in their territories and the French and English often pitted vulnerable native groups against each other to advance their own gains. Indigenous populations in Canada were further decimated in other ways by the subsequent introduction of epidemics such as smallpox, measles and influenza.

The Secwépemc, whose ancestors lived in the south-central interior of British Columbia for 10,000 years, were not visited by Europeans until 1793. Interestingly, the Secwépemc and other peoples of the interior considered the French-Canadian fur traders who established a fort at Kamloops in 1812 to be the “true whites”.

Secwépemc territory was not finally settled by white men until the late 1850s. However, those who followed the fur traders – miners, ranchers and farmers – were not so popular.

Even before Europeans came into contact with them, the disease was ravaging the indigenous populations of British Columbia, with the most serious smallpox epidemic occurring in the 1860s and decimating many Secwépemc villages.

Around the same time, the first reserves were established, the largest of which was at Tk’emlúps.

Among the Secwépemc, leaders like Chief Louis (Clexlexqen), who was the hereditary chief of Kamloops from 1855 until his death in 1915, worked to improve conditions for the people.

In 1910, the Secwépemc and other Interior peoples asked then-Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier to help them make treaties.

This document, known as the Memorial to Sir Wilfrid Laurier, sets out the grievances of the people of the time, which remain unresolved to this day.

He states, “True white people have recognized our ownership of the country.”

The memorial can be found and read in the block of Victoria Street in downtown Kamloops, where it is embedded in a rock.

The Secwépemc Nation today comprises 17 bands living on a traditional territory of approximately 145,000 square kilometres. More than 7,000 Secwépemc live in this vast region of interior British Columbia.

The Secwépemc Nation as a whole is not involved in the provincial government’s treaty process, but a few Secwépemc bands are in the process of researching their land claims.

Additionally, cultural and economic organizations have been established to bring the Secwépemc peoples together for the betterment of their lives.

The Secwépemc Cultural Education Society (SCES) – formed in 1982 to preserve and enhance the history, language and culture of the people – established a museum in the former building of the Kamloops Indian Residential School, which later moved to the school annex.

A five-hectare heritage park, a joint project of SCES and the Kamloops Indian Band, officially opened in 1993, depicting the Secwépemc culture, including c7’istken (dry houses) reconstructed on the site of a village of 2,000 year old winter.

The museum and heritage park have since been taken over by Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc.

Unfortunately, since the declaration of the pandemic in March 2020, the museum and heritage park have been closed and, unfortunately, since last year, with the discovery of the approximately 200 underground anomalies indicating probable graves, the area is closed, designated site sacred of Le Estcwicwéý (The Disappeared).

It is ironic that the same buildings where native children were forced to learn English and dress like white children, where boys were trained to be farmers and girls to do laundry, are now buildings that house offices dedicated to improving and promoting Secwépemc programs, including language and culture classes.

The museum is currently being renovated with an HVAC system and upgraded exhibits, so it remains closed to the public. A reopening date has not been determined.

In the meantime, the museum is offering Zoom presentations and school tours. The heritage park, however, will not be accessible for a long time.

More information on the Secwépemc Museum and Heritage Park is online at secwepemcmuseum.ca.

Ken Favrholdt is the Archivist of the Secwépemc Museum and Heritage Park.

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Decibel will announce its first quarter https://davidthompsonthings.com/decibel-will-announce-its-first-quarter/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 13:54:34 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/decibel-will-announce-its-first-quarter/ CALGARY, Alta., May 19, 2022 /PRNewswire/ – Decibel Cannabis Company Inc. (the “Company” or “Decibel”) (TSXV: DB) (OTCQB: DBCCF), a premium cannabis producer, is pleased to announce that the Company will release its financial results of the first quarter of 2022 and related discussion and management analysis on May 25, 2022 before the market opens. […]]]>

CALGARY, Alta., May 19, 2022 /PRNewswire/ – Decibel Cannabis Company Inc. (the “Company” or “Decibel”) (TSXV: DB) (OTCQB: DBCCF), a premium cannabis producer, is pleased to announce that the Company will release its financial results of the first quarter of 2022 and related discussion and management analysis on May 25, 2022 before the market opens.

About decibel

Decibel is uncompromising in the process and craftsmanship required to deliver the highest quality cannabis products and retail experiences. Decibel has three operating production houses as well as its wholly-owned retail business, Prairie Records. The Qwest domain at Creston, BC is a 26,000 square foot licensed and operated grow space that produces the widely championed and rare cultivar-focused brands Qwest and Qwest Reserve, which are sold in six provinces across Canada. Thunderchild Cultivation, is an 80,000 square foot indoor cultivation facility licensed and operated in Battleford, Sask.. L’Usine, Decibel’s extraction plant, in Calgary, Alta. has 15,000 square feet of Health Canada-licensed extraction and product development space. This production house will fuel the growth of our Qwest, Qwest Reserve and Blendcraft brands, in new and innovative product formats like concentrates, vapes, edibles and more.

Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

favicon.png?sn=TO62735&sd=2022-05-19 View original content to download multimedia: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/decibel-to-announce-first-quarter-results-on-may-25-301551090.html

SOURCE Decibel Cannabis Company Inc.

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The Canadian Housing Market in Full-Fledged Cooling Mode https://davidthompsonthings.com/the-canadian-housing-market-in-full-fledged-cooling-mode/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 20:08:05 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/the-canadian-housing-market-in-full-fledged-cooling-mode/ Rapidly rising interest rates have a definite deterrent effect on housing market activity across Canada. Home resales fell for a third straight month in May, down 8.6% from April, with nearly all local areas experiencing some moderation. Extremely tight supply and demand conditions are rapidly rebalancing. This marks a sea change from the exuberance that […]]]>

Rapidly rising interest rates have a definite deterrent effect on housing market activity across Canada. Home resales fell for a third straight month in May, down 8.6% from April, with nearly all local areas experiencing some moderation. Extremely tight supply and demand conditions are rapidly rebalancing. This marks a sea change from the exuberance that has prevailed for most of the pandemic. For now, house prices are softening primarily in Ontario and British Columbia, but emerging signs of weakness are also appearing in Alberta markets. We expect the bearish sentiment to strengthen and spread further as the Bank of Canada moves forward with a “vigorous” monetary policy normalization. We believe this will set the stage for widespread property depreciation in the period ahead.

Activity below pre-pandemic levels

Home resales fell to 512,000 units (seasonally adjusted and annualized) nationally last month. It was the first time that activity slipped below the 525,000 units recorded in February 2020 since the start of the pandemic-era rally in the summer of 2020. The situation, however, varies widely across the country. Despite a drop in May (and in many cases in April), activity remains strong — and well above pre-pandemic levels — in the Prairie and Atlantic provinces. The pan-Canadian easing fully mirrors trends in British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec where buyers are now clearly on the defensive.

Sellers lose their grip on Ontario and British Columbia markets

As demand cools, more and more properties are coming onto the market. New listings rose 4.5% m/m in Canada last month. This accelerated the rebalancing process that began in March. The most striking developments are in Ontario and British Columbia, where sellers are rapidly losing their (previously strong) grip on the market, although supply and demand conditions are not yet putting buyers in the driver’s seat. . Sellers, however, still hold strong positions in other parts of the country. Atlantic Canadian markets, in particular, continue to be exceptionally tight.

Lower house prices in Ontario and British Columbia

The MLS home price index fell for the second straight time in May, falling 0.8% m/m Canada-wide. Ontario and British Columbia are responsible for most of the easing. Cambridge (-4.6%), North Bay (-4.0%), Woodstock-Ingersoll (-3.9%), Huron-Perth (-3.6%), London-St. Thomas (-3.5%) and Chilliwack (-3.0%) posted the most notable declines from April. The MLS HPI fell slightly in Greater Toronto (-1.1%), but remained largely stable in the Greater Vancouver area (up 0.1%). We expect downward pressure on prices to build further in Ontario and British Columbia, as these markets are more sensitive to interest rate increases.

Property values ​​peak in Alberta?

There were signs that prices could top in Alberta. The MLS HPI fell slightly in Calgary (-0.1% m/m) and Edmonton (-0.4%) last month. In the case of Edmonton, this happened as supply and demand conditions moved sharply out of seller’s market territory over the past two months. We believe that recent developments indicate more stable price trends, and not necessarily a major correction. We believe the relative affordability of Alberta markets will keep demand strong in the near term.

Prices continue to rise in Atlantic Canada

While the pace has generally slowed, the MLS HPIs continued to appreciate last month. Moncton (up 2.5% m/m), Saint John (up 2.2%) and Prince Edward Island (up 1.4%) led the way with largest monthly earnings. With supply and demand conditions still very tight in the Atlantic region and favorable affordability compared to other parts of Canada, we expect prices to face milder headwinds in the during the coming period.

Cooldown to varying degrees

The very atypical synchronization of local market cycles since the start of the pandemic is gradually breaking up. Rapidly rising interest rates – we expect the Bank of Canada to raise its policy rate an additional 125 basis points by the fall – are putting uneven pressure on homebuyers across Canada, those in weaker markets most expensive facing the greatest challenges. We believe the cooling trends that have emerged over the past three months will intensify over the coming months, leading to widespread price corrections, particularly in Ontario and British Columbia. From peak to trough, we think benchmark prices could fall by around 10% nationally, and closer to 13% in Ontario and British Columbia. Corrections in other provincial markets will likely be more modest.



Robert Hogue is a member of the Macro and Regional Analysis Group at RBC Economics. He is responsible for providing analysis and forecasts for the Canadian housing market and for provincial economies. His publications include housing trends and affordability, provincial outlooks and provincial budget commentaries.

Disclaimer

This article is intended to provide general information only and should not be considered to constitute legal, financial or other professional advice. A professional adviser should be consulted regarding your particular situation. The information presented is believed to be factual and up-to-date, but we do not guarantee its accuracy and should not be considered a complete analysis of the topics discussed. All expressions of opinion reflect the judgment of the authors as of the date of publication and are subject to change. No endorsement of third parties or their advice, opinions, information, products or services is expressly given or implied by Royal Bank of Canada or any of its affiliates.

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North Norfolk region hit by ‘flash flood’ https://davidthompsonthings.com/north-norfolk-region-hit-by-flash-flood/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 21:34:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/north-norfolk-region-hit-by-flash-flood/ A flash of rain and thunderstorms caused even more flooding across Manitoba, forcing at least one rural municipality to declare a local state of emergency. Roads have been washed out and local infrastructure is struggling to handle the heavy rains that have fallen across the Austin community over the past 24 hours. PROVIDED Two […]]]>



A flash of rain and thunderstorms caused even more flooding across Manitoba, forcing at least one rural municipality to declare a local state of emergency.

Roads have been washed out and local infrastructure is struggling to handle the heavy rains that have fallen across the Austin community over the past 24 hours.


PROVIDED

Two of the bridges that dot the Souris Glenwood Golf Club were swept away.

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PROVIDED

Two of the bridges that dot the Souris Glenwood Golf Club were swept away.

The MR of North Norfolk (of which Austin is part) declared a local state of emergency on Tuesday, after Mayor Gerald Barber said the community had been ‘flooded’, with reports of up to 120 millimeters rain. (Social media posts pushed the number even higher, to 150mm in some cases.)

“It’s basically a flash flood… Our lift stations are really struggling to keep up, so there’s a risk of sewer backup,” Barber told the Free press Tuesday. “We’ve got a lot of pumps going and we’re just trying to do what we can.”

Barber said the RM (located between Portage la Prairie and Carberry) is working to pick up rural residents who have only one road to access their property and are now stranded, and is providing sandbags in Austin (population about 420), while warning the farming community of MacGregor to the east of possible rainfall heading its way.




<p>ETHAN CAIRNS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p>
<p>Tuesday’s rainfall likely won’t be the last of the week, said Environment and Climate Change <a class=Canada meteorologist Terri Lang.

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ETHAN CAIRNS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Tuesday’s rainfall likely won’t be the last of the week, said Environment and Climate Change Canada meteorologist Terri Lang.

“The road ditches between Austin and MacGregor are full from water escaping from the drainage ditches, and eventually it will come to MacGregor and pass,” the mayor said. “It’s heading east through the municipality… We’ll start making dykes as we see the need.”

A state of emergency was declared in part so residents could ask the province to fund repairs; the RM also plans to make a claim to help repair the damage.

Some of the most devastating damage, Barber said, was to hundreds of acres of farmland, with crops that were lost to the sudden summer storm, after a tough spring that has already delayed planting.

“When you get that much rain, in such a short time, and your systems are already full of water, it’s just a disaster,” he said. “There is nothing that can control it.”

To the southwest, Souris Glenwood Golf Club was sold out with a week of special events, until flooding from nearby Elgin Creek overran much of the greenery, manager Bob Warden said.

“We were here to open as usual at 8 a.m. this morning, and we were shocked to see the river flowing like crazy,” he said on Tuesday.

Two of the bridges that dot the golf course were swept away. Warden hoped staff and volunteers could clean up in time to reopen Wednesday at reduced hours and get back on track in time for Father’s Day, but it’s all up to Mother Nature.

“We’ll get it back in shape once we can get there, but it’s just a question of when we can get there, that’s the question,” he said. “Because we don’t know how much rain is coming.”

Unfortunately for those hardest hit, Tuesday’s rains are unlikely to be the last of the week, said Environment and Climate Change Canada meteorologist Terri Lang.

“It looks like everyone will be getting rain in southern Manitoba,” she said. “Again, these parts of the west are probably feeling the pinch, but it looks like everyone is going to be in on it, at least for the next two days.”

The showers originate from a large low pressure center covering most of the Prairie provinces, which first formed in the United States and hit southern Manitoba on Monday.

After a brief break, another bout of rain is on the way Wednesday night into Thursday. Manitobans should do what they’ve been doing all spring: prepare their homes for the possibility of flooding, Lang said.

Winnipeg’s spring season has been marked by snow and rain, and Environment Canada‘s final rainfall figures show it. The city recorded more than double its average rainfall for the season (March-May), making it the fifth wettest spring on record in 150 years.

malak.abas@freepress.mb.ca

Malak Abas

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Canadians are lagging behind American consumers when it comes to EVs https://davidthompsonthings.com/canadians-are-lagging-behind-american-consumers-when-it-comes-to-evs/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 13:43:58 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/canadians-are-lagging-behind-american-consumers-when-it-comes-to-evs/ In a surprise survey, Canadian consumers lag behind their American counterparts when it comes to buying an electric vehicle (EV) for their next vehicle. While many had assumed that Canadian consumers were more predisposed to adopting EVs, the inaugural Electric Vehicle Consideration in Canada (EVC) study conducted recently by JD Power found that 53% of […]]]>

In a surprise survey, Canadian consumers lag behind their American counterparts when it comes to buying an electric vehicle (EV) for their next vehicle.

While many had assumed that Canadian consumers were more predisposed to adopting EVs, the inaugural Electric Vehicle Consideration in Canada (EVC) study conducted recently by JD Power found that 53% of consumers in Canada say are either “very unlikely” or “somewhat unlikely” to consider an electric vehicle (EV) for their next vehicle purchase. This figure contrasts with that of the United States, where 59% of consumers say they are “very likely” or “somewhat likely” to consider an electric vehicle for their next purchase. Automakers and government officials.

This is especially important as automakers and government have “ambitious goals” for EV adoption, JD Ney, director, automotive practice leader at JD Power Canada, said in a results webinar. .

The Government of Canada has set a mandatory target for all new light-duty cars and passenger trucks to be zero emissions by 2035. It has already invested over $1 billion to support increased adoption of zero vehicles emission. The Zero Emission Vehicle Infrastructure Program (ZEVIP) is a $680 million initiative ending in 2027, designed to address charging infrastructure needs.

“There are several systemic challenges unique to Canada that manufacturers and policy makers need to collaborate on to effectively navigate the transition,” Ney said.

“The good news is that consideration of electric vehicles increases dramatically across a number of metrics once consumers become more knowledgeable about the capabilities of newer electric vehicles or, better yet, have first-hand experience of them.”

Key findings from the 2022 study could help shape the strategies of automakers, government and, by extension, aftermarket players entering the electric vehicle space.

Of particular note is the regional nature of the results.

The interest rate for EVs is the highest in Western Canada, with 59% of consumers in British Columbia indicating an interest in owning an EV. Residents of Quebec (50%) and Ontario (47%) have an average interest in owning an EV, while residents of the Prairies (38%) and Atlantic Canada (35%) show the least of interest.

The stark difference between US and Canadian results for cold-weather performance is also of interest to all, with 44% of Canadians citing range performance in extreme temperatures as a barrier to review, about three times that of US consumers surveyed previously.

Limited driving distance per charge is cited by 65% ​​of those who say it is “somewhat unlikely” or “very unlikely” to consider an electric vehicle, compared to 44% of US consumers with a similar level of consideration.

It’s not hard to see how distances and winter temperatures act like a punch in the back of EV adoption in the prairie provinces of Canada.

Beyond this, other key findings include

  • Cost is a metric to watch: Six in 10 consumers (61%) who say they are unlikely to consider the purchase price of an electric vehicle as a factor. That compares to just 44% of US consumers saying the same. While those in Canada have access to an incentive program at the federal level, many provinces lack meaningful incentives to help close the significant gap between the purchase price of traditional internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles and that electric vehicles.
  • More information breeds more consideration: The more experience consumers have with electric vehicles, the more likely they are to consider an electric vehicle for their next vehicle purchase. The probability of considering electric vehicles is only 15% among those who have no experience with these vehicles. This number rises to 22% among those who have been passengers in an electric vehicle and to 42% among those who have driven one. Nearly half (49%) of those who own an EV will consider another EV for their next vehicle purchase.

The Canadian Electric Vehicle Consideration (EVC) Study will be used as an annual industry benchmark to gauge EV buyer consideration. The content of the study includes the global consideration of EVs by geography; demography; vehicle experience and use; way of life; and psychographic. It also includes details on model-level considerations, such as cross-purchase and “why buy” outcomes, as well as an analysis of reasons for rejection of electric vehicles. The study measured responses from 3,701 consumers and was conducted in April-May 2022.

Visit JDPower.com/business.

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Western provincial economies shine brighter in 2022 https://davidthompsonthings.com/western-provincial-economies-shine-brighter-in-2022/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 06:32:34 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/western-provincial-economies-shine-brighter-in-2022/ The lifting of nearly all pandemic-related restrictions will benefit provincial economies this year, but won’t necessarily put growth on a higher trajectory. In fact, we expect growth to slow in a small majority of provinces as the previous economic slowdown is fully reversed and stimulus measures are removed. Some pandemic-era issues (e.g. supply chain disruptions) […]]]>

The lifting of nearly all pandemic-related restrictions will benefit provincial economies this year, but won’t necessarily put growth on a higher trajectory. In fact, we expect growth to slow in a small majority of provinces as the previous economic slowdown is fully reversed and stimulus measures are removed. Some pandemic-era issues (e.g. supply chain disruptions) will continue to pose challenges, while soaring inflation emerges as a major source of stress for businesses and households form an ocean to another.

We believe that the best performing provincial economies will be those most dependent on commodity production (with the exception of Newfoundland and Labrador). The boom in global commodity markets will fuel considerable activity in the primary sector.

While 2022 is shaping up to be a mixed bag among the provinces, we expect all to grow. We expect growth to be strongest in Saskatchewan (+6.0%), Alberta (+5.7%) and Manitoba (4.8%). We have British Columbia (4.2%), Ontario (4.1%) and Quebec (3.6%) in the middle of the pack, with the Atlantic provinces trailing behind. The slowdown in growth in the latter region mainly reflects the fact that these provinces are more advanced in their recovery.

The Prairie provinces have more ground to recover than previously thought

The release of preliminary GDP by industry figures for 2021 brought some surprises. Growth was stronger than expected in the Maritimes, British Columbia and Ontario. Progress in the Maritime provinces was widespread, with notable gains in agriculture and construction. A strong rebound in the health care industry and blistering activity in the real estate and professional services sectors provided strong gains in Ontario and British Columbia.

Perhaps more importantly, the severe drought conditions hit the agricultural sector in the Prairie Provinces harder than we anticipated. Saskatchewan was the hardest hit, with its economy contracting slightly last year. Manitoba’s growth (1.2%) was a fraction of our previous forecast (4.5%). Both are expected to rebound significantly if weather conditions return to closer to normal this year.

Housing is becoming less of a driver in many parts of Canada

The first signs of a housing market slowdown appeared this spring in parts of Ontario, British Columbia and Quebec. We expect rising interest rates to further dampen home resale activity in the period ahead and spread the cooling effect to other regions. Rapidly deteriorating affordability, particularly in Canada‘s most expensive markets, will make it increasingly difficult to maintain recent property values. In fact, we believe home prices have already reached a tipping point in several markets in Ontario and British Columbia. The slowdown in activity will dampen the housing sector’s substantial contribution to economic growth during the pandemic. We expect this to be a more important factor in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Ontario and British Columbia, where home resales will reach extremely high levels in 2021. Continued strong housing construction will provide some compensation. We expect housing starts to increase in Atlantic Canada and the Prairies, and remain historically strong elsewhere despite moderating from pandemic highs.

Inflation is a big problem across Canada

Inflation concerns remain front and center coast to coast, with the most intense pressures felt in the Maritimes, Manitoba and Ontario. Higher energy costs are weighing heavily on residents of the Maritimes, where soaring fuel prices are having a disproportionate impact on home heating costs. And it is in Manitoba and Ontario that the rise in house prices is supporting the cost of owned accommodation the most. Inflation is comparatively lower in Western Canada and Newfoundland, although it is still at its highest level since the start of inflation targeting, in part due to more moderate increases in the number of rented and owned accommodation. We expect the inflation rate to gradually decline across Canada later this year as energy prices stabilize, higher interest rates moderate consumer demand and a slowing housing market eases pressure on housing costs.

Labor markets are extremely tight almost everywhere

Tight labor markets continue to pose huge challenges to businesses and an obstacle to the full recovery of some industries, including hospitality and tourism, where job vacancy rates remain at record highs. Provincial partnerships with the federal government for $10/day child care as well as higher immigration targets will be part of the solution, although they are unlikely to completely resolve the situation in the short term. Post-pandemic immigration is already increasing, especially in coastal regions of Canada. In British Columbia, immigration has more than doubled in 2022 from pre-pandemic levels and in Atlantic Canada, Ottawa’s immigration targets could help increase population size by 4% over over the next three years.

Commodity boom bodes well for Western Canada

Strong global demand and commodity prices are significantly improving the outlook for Western Canada. In the agricultural sector, crop receipts are already high (thanks to high producer prices) despite depressed yields last year. Prospects for this year are positive, with total area seeded for major crops matching historical averages across the Prairies. Weather cooperating, Saskatchewan should report a huge rebound in agricultural production this year, following an exceptionally low level in 2021. We expect stronger agricultural production to also boost overall economic growth in Manitoba and Alberta.

The massive boom in global energy markets further benefits Alberta’s economy. While crude oil production to date in the province is largely at levels of a year ago, the value of energy exports has increased by 50% due to higher prices. The corresponding increase in revenue will fuel investment as well as spending more broadly in the province. After experiencing tremendous hardship since 2015 (including two oil crashes and deep recessions), the stars are finally aligning for Alberta’s economy to maintain a solid expansion.

In British Columbia, capital investment in the natural resources sector (including the construction of a major LNG project) will continue to play a key role in the province’s growth.

Growth to moderate in central Canada

We expect growth to slow this year in central Canada, while remaining well above the pre-pandemic average rate, in part due to slowing housing markets. We expect residential activity to decline in Ontario and Quebec after hitting record (and unsustainable) levels in 2021. High inflation and rising interest rates will prove increasingly challenging for consumers and businesses. As a net energy-consuming region, central Canada will be negatively affected by high oil and gas prices. Beyond inflation, manufacturers also face many labor and supply chain hurdles. We don’t expect these issues to dissipate quickly, dampening manufacturing output in the near term.

Maritimes towards next stage of recovery as Newfoundland lags behind

We have revised down our forecast for growth in Atlantic Canada in 2022. For the Maritimes, this reflects the robust recovery in 2021, which leaves less ground to catch up moving forward. We expect growth in the region to be below the national average. In Newfoundland and Labrador, lower crude oil production and capital spending will continue to weigh heavily on the provincial economy, keeping growth weak and the recovery incomplete. Offshore oil production fell in all major oilfields, with Terra Nova expected to remain offline until the fall. The recovery in tourism this summer should continue to support hospitality spending. Atlantic Canada continues to benefit from the boom in interprovincial and international migration. We see in this flow of new migrants the sign of renewed economic vigour.



about the authors

Robert Hogue is a member of the Macro and Regional Analysis Group at RBC Economics. He is responsible for providing analysis and forecasts for the Canadian housing market and for provincial economies. His publications include housing trends and affordability, provincial outlooks and provincial budget commentaries.

Carrie Freestone is an economist at RBC. She provides labor market analysis and is a member of the regional analysis group, contributing to the provincial macroeconomic outlook.

Disclaimer

This article is intended to provide general information only and should not be considered to constitute legal, financial or other professional advice. A professional adviser should be consulted regarding your particular situation. The information presented is believed to be factual and up-to-date, but we do not guarantee its accuracy and should not be considered a complete analysis of the topics discussed. All expressions of opinion reflect the judgment of the authors as of the date of publication and are subject to change. No endorsement of third parties or their advice, opinions, information, products or services is expressly given or implied by Royal Bank of Canada or any of its affiliates.

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Don’t be silly, discover the verticillium https://davidthompsonthings.com/dont-be-silly-discover-the-verticillium/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 00:59:19 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/dont-be-silly-discover-the-verticillium/ On August 10, 2020, Brad Crammond noticed sudden, premature mortality in a seemingly healthy canola field. “We’ve had issues with blackleg in the past,” says the Austin, Man., farmer, “and I could tell it was something different.” So he called Canola Council of Canada agronomist Angela Brackenreed to take a look. “The symptoms were advanced […]]]>

On August 10, 2020, Brad Crammond noticed sudden, premature mortality in a seemingly healthy canola field. “We’ve had issues with blackleg in the past,” says the Austin, Man., farmer, “and I could tell it was something different.”

So he called Canola Council of Canada agronomist Angela Brackenreed to take a look. “The symptoms were advanced verticillium stripes,” says Brackenreed. “It was pretty obvious.” Samples sent to the PSI laboratory in Manitoba confirmed the diagnosis.

The disease, caused by the pathogen Verticillium longisporum, is relatively new to canola in Canada. It was first detected in Manitoba in 2014. In 2015, Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) investigators found the pathogen in six provinces, including all three Prairie provinces. In 2020, the incidence rate in some fields was high enough to cause yield loss. For the 2021 Manitoba Disease Survey, the first year that surveyors had an effective system for including verticillium wilt, 30% of fields had the disease. In these fields, 15% of the plants, on average, showed symptoms.

Verticillium streak, unlike other diseases, can be more severe in dry conditions, which could explain why the disease has reached new heights in 2021. Crammond, experienced with the symptoms, also saw verticillium streak last season.

“Now that we know what we’re looking for, we find it all over the Prairies,” says Brackenreed.

Early infection can show up as diseased gray or tan stripes down the half of the stem – hence the name “stripe”. Similarly, infected leaves may be dying on one side and healthy on the other.

As the verticillium infection progresses, the epidermis peels away from the weakened stems to reveal tiny spots called microsclerotia underneath. These spots may look similar to blackleg pycnidia, but verticillium spots are much smaller. Verticillium stripe, like blackleg, also causes darkening of the cross section of the stem. While blackleg causes distinct black wedge shapes, verticillium discoloration is diffuse throughout the cross section and continually darkens as microsclerotia accumulate. Verticillium infection can extend up the stem, while blackleg is concentrated in the crown around ground level. Eventually, verticillium infection blocks water and nutrient transfer, weakening the stem and killing the plant.

“Because we’re letting the canola sit longer, either for straight harvesting or later swathing, we may be noticing the disease more than before,” says Brackenreed. “Verticillium infection can also continue to progress after canola plants are swathed, but people don’t usually watch the swaths that closely.

In 2020, Crammond had stems that broke and toppled over, making her look like a case of severe lodging from afar. “We had high winds in August of that year and a lot of the Twitter chatter was about the crop dropping and making it difficult to harvest,” he says. “In retrospect, the cause of many of these cases may have been a verticillium band.”

Differences between cultivars

Crammond knows the disease has reduced yields on his farm, but Canada does not yet have a system for estimating the amount of losses.

In Europe, which also has a verticillium wilt problem in oilseed rape (Brassica napus), a 2008 study by Dunker et al. Yield loss estimated between 10 and 50%. In 2016 Jasper Depotter, a plant pathology researcher at the University of Cologne, published the results of field trials in the UK. Depotter’s study showed yield loss as high as 34%, with differences between cultivars. Based on this, he says, “in a bad year on a susceptible cultivar, Dunker’s estimates seem realistic.”

Genetic differences also appear in Canadian research. Dilantha Fernando, a professor in the Department of Plant Science at the University of Manitoba, tested germplasm from international sources and dozens of lines provided by Canadian seed companies. He says some have significantly higher levels of resistance, but the lines provided to him have not been identified, so he does not know if any were commercial cultivars.

In Saskatoon, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada researcher Hossein Borhan is examining 50 Brassica napus lines as part of AAFC’s Nested Association Mapping (NAM) program to compare their resistance to verticillium scratching. Some lines are very resistant, others are very sensitive, he says.

Crammond’s on-farm experience shows differences between cultivars. In 2021, he ran out of seed in one field and finished the last eight acres with a different cultivar. While most of the field was in danger of being destroyed due to high levels of verticillium wilt, the eight acres of a different variety had “no problem,” he says.

Rotation helps

No fungicide solution is available at this time. Genetic resistance will likely provide the highest level of protection, with effective crop rotation support.

While researchers don’t know how many years between canola crops are needed to provide effective risk reduction, Crammond’s experience shows that rotation can work. One of his canola fields in 2020 was on a half section with a mixed crop history. Eighty acres in the middle had quinoa, soybeans and wheat in the previous five years – no canola. The others had been in a wheat-canola rotation for “quite a while,” he says. While the rest of the field turned brown prematurely due to verticillium wilt, the 80 acres with a longer break between canola crops remained green and healthy. It was the same cultivar.

“The increase in cases of verticillium stripe makes crop rotation even more important, in my opinion,” says Crammond.

“Rotation has so many other benefits, so it’s worth it,” says Brackenreed. Some evidence suggests that incorporating stubble into tillage may also increase spore longevity, she adds, so minimal tillage may provide additional help.

Brackenreed recommends canola growers across the Prairies monitor for verticillium wilt in 2022. “Learn how to identify the disease so you know what you’re dealing with,” she says. “And because there seems to be a genetic component, be sure to compare results from different cultivars. Although we do not currently know which cultivars have increased resistance, the genetic diversity resulting from the use of different cultivars could cushion the risk.

-Jay Whetter is Manager of Communications at the Canola Council of Canada.

Yixiao Wang, a doctoral student in applied plant pathology at the University of Alberta, compared cross-sections of stems infected with verticillium wilt to those of blackleg. With the verticillium, the darkening may extend up the stem (above) while the darkening of the blackleg stem is concentrated around ground level. By splitting the infected stems lengthwise, Wang found that she could tell the two diseases apart based on the upward extent of stem darkening.

Photo:
Yixiao Wang
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The 12 Best National Parks in Canada https://davidthompsonthings.com/the-12-best-national-parks-in-canada/ Tue, 31 May 2022 21:47:13 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/the-12-best-national-parks-in-canada/ Arctic tundra, shady forests and glacial lakes. The cold of the Atlantic Ocean lashing the rocky shores and the confetti of summer wildflowers in the Rocky Mountains. For many, a wilderness experience is virtually synonymous with a visit to Canada, and exploring its national parks is an immersion in the country’s natural beauty and cultural […]]]>

Arctic tundra, shady forests and glacial lakes. The cold of the Atlantic Ocean lashing the rocky shores and the confetti of summer wildflowers in the Rocky Mountains. For many, a wilderness experience is virtually synonymous with a visit to Canada, and exploring its national parks is an immersion in the country’s natural beauty and cultural history.

Demand for the type of travel park offering is also growing, according to a 2021 survey of global tour operators by the Adventure Travel Trade Association. The report highlighted the popularity of backpacking and noted that Canada ranks in the top third of trending destinations for outdoor adventure tour bookings.

With 48 national parks in the Canadian network, there is no shortage of outdoor spaces to visit. Whether you want to get your hands dirty by participating in one of the park’s citizen science projects, savor the healing powers of nature – in four Canadian provinces, visits to national parks can now be prescribed as medicine by doctors – or embark on an adrenaline-filled adventure in the backcountry, these are some of the best national parks in the country.

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