The Prairie Provinces – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 11:19:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidthompsonthings.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png The Prairie Provinces – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ 32 32 Health summit tackles shortage of rural and northern doctors https://davidthompsonthings.com/health-summit-tackles-shortage-of-rural-and-northern-doctors/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 23:09:11 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/health-summit-tackles-shortage-of-rural-and-northern-doctors/ Breadcrumb Links New Manitoba Photo by Photo file /Getty Images Content of the article Doctors Manitoba president Dr. Candace Bradshaw admits she was more than a little worried about the outcome of last week’s healthcare summit. Advertisement 2 This ad has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. Content of the article Bringing rural […]]]>

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Doctors Manitoba president Dr. Candace Bradshaw admits she was more than a little worried about the outcome of last week’s healthcare summit.

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Bringing rural and northern physicians together with local business and political leaders could lend itself to what Bradshaw called “stinging conversations” or disagreements between participants over priorities.

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“I would say the flavor in the room was very positive and it was collaborative and it was good. I think it turned out better than we imagined,” Bradshaw said.

“There’s just a lot of potential for disagreement and we didn’t find that to be the flavor of the day at all.”

A special stakeholder summit was held Wednesday in Portage la Prairie, hosted by Doctors Manitoba and the Manitoba Chambers of Commerce. The Summit focused on assessing the physician shortage in rural and northern Manitoba and potential solutions to attract and retain more physicians. More than 100 participants have registered to attend, including doctors and leaders from healthcare, business and local communities.

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“From Doctors Manitoba’s perspective, we hope that with the recommendations that we will compile and present to government on behalf of not only physicians, but also the Manitoba Chambers of Commerce and many municipalities that have contributed, we hope to see as many of them as possible put into action,” Bradshaw said. “This is going to require some collaboration and funding from government and ongoing discussions between health care (stakeholders) and the business community.

“Investment in the health system is a top priority for our members, and research shows that the economic potential of communities is supported by strong services,” said Chuck Davidson, President and CEO of the Chambers of Commerce. of Manitoba in a news release. “I was encouraged by today’s discussion at the Summit, which included physicians, community leaders and business leaders who care deeply that we all have access to effective, quality care everywhere. Province. Manitoba’s ability to recruit and retain more physicians is critical to our future growth.

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President of Doctors Manitoba, Dr. Candace Bradshaw.
President of Doctors Manitoba, Dr. Candace Bradshaw. Picture by handout /Winnipeg Sun

Manitoba has the fewest number of family physicians per capita in Canada and the third lowest for specialist physicians according to the most recent data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Additionally, 40% of physicians plan to retire, reduce clinical hours or move to another province within the next three years, according to a recent survey by Doctors Manitoba. Nearly half of physicians show signs of burnout, which research shows is a leading cause of physician retention issues.

To be a doctor in a rural area, you have to prepare for the fact that you are “the end of the line” when it comes to patient care, especially in the emergency room, and that you have to spend hours on the phone trying to getting the care patients need. , Bradshaw said.

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“These things have become extremely time-consuming, stressful and difficult,” Bradshaw said.

One possible solution would be a one-stop telephone service similar to what is offered in other provinces where a trier can relieve rural physicians from having to make these arrangements.

“We have to start looking at that stuff here because it actually drives people to the point where they don’t want to work in rural areas anymore,” Bradshaw said.

Further consultations are planned over the coming weeks to validate the findings with Summit participants, as well as broader medical and economic development professionals. The goal is to refine promising practices into a final report with recommendations for recruiting and retaining more physicians. The report should be available at the end of October. It will be shared with the provincial government for review and made available to the public for review.

Manitoba Health Minister Audrey Gordon attended Wednesday’s summit and pledged to look forward to the report being laid on her desk and hopefully developing action plans. “I’ll hold her back,” Bradshaw said.

gdawkins@postmedia.com

Twitter: @SunGlenDawkins

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Montana adds 1,427 cases, six new deaths https://davidthompsonthings.com/montana-adds-1427-cases-six-new-deaths/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 17:40:16 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/montana-adds-1427-cases-six-new-deaths/ As of Friday morning, Montana confirmed 309,452 positive cases of COVID-19. Montana’s COVID-19 case tracking map shows 1,427 new confirmed cases. There are currently 1,648 active cases in the state. According to the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, 1,545,306 doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered and 574,544 Montana residents are fully […]]]>

As of Friday morning, Montana confirmed 309,452 positive cases of COVID-19. Montana’s COVID-19 case tracking map shows 1,427 new confirmed cases. There are currently 1,648 active cases in the state.

According to the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, 1,545,306 doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered and 574,544 Montana residents are fully immunized.

In Missoula, 213,917 doses have been administered and 78,246 people are fully immunized. 64% of Missoula’s eligible population is fully immunized, which is the most tied in the state. You can find current case numbers from the City of Missoula Department of Health here.

The number of COVID-19-related deaths in the state rose from 3,512 on September 16, 2022 to 3,518 on September 16, 2022, according to state health officials.

Here are the updated case totals in Montana:

Gallatin County case:
39,305 | 207 Newly Reported | 225 Active

Case of Missoula County:
31,838 Total | 207 Newly Reported | 265 Active

Case of Yellowstone County:
48,022 Total | 173 Newly Reported | 314 Active

Flathead County case:
32,344 | 127 Newly Reported | 79 Active

Case of Lewis and Clark County:
20,612 Total | 114 Newly Reported | 78 Active

Cascade County Case:
28,188 Total | 106 Newly Reported | 173 Active

Case of Ravalli County:
7,887 Total | 52 Newly Reported | 60 active

Lake County case:
7,653 Total | 46 Newly Reported | 51 Active

Case of Glacier County:
4,460 Total | 40 newly reported | 11 Active

Case of Deer Lodge County:
2,954 Total | 30 newly reported | 20 assets

Silver Bow County Case:
9,316 Total | 27 Newly Reported | 42 Active

Case of Chouteau County:
1,169 Total | 24 Newly Reported | 20 assets

Madison County case:
2,231 Total | 23 Newly Reported | 23 Active

Park County case:
4,898 Total | 19 Newly Reported | 19 Active

Hill County Case:
5,108 Total | 18 Newly Reported | 12 Active

Case of Roosevelt County:
3,618 Total | 18 Newly Reported | 23 Active

Richland County case:
2,851 Total | 17 Newly Reported | 11 Active

Blaine County case:
2,403 Total | 14 Newly Reported | 8 Active

Lincoln County Case:
5,315 | 14 Newly Reported | 31 Active

Valley County case:
2,004 Total | 14 Newly Reported | 23 Active

Jefferson County case:
2,950 | 13 Newly Reported | 6 Active

Case of Custer County:
3,316 Total | 11 Newly Reported | 15 active

Beaverhead County case:
2,356 Total | 10 Newly reported | 15 active

Broadwater County case:
1,456 Total | 9 Newly Reported | 5 Active

Carbon County case:
2,305 | 9 Newly Reported | 8 Active

Meagher County case:
539 total | 7 Newly Reported | 11 Active

Stillwater County case:
1,662 Total | 7 Newly Reported | 11 Active

Big Horn County Case:
5,433 Total | 6 Newly Reported | 8 Active

Case of Fergus County:
2,803 Total | 5 Newly reported | 6 Active

Case of Musselshell County:
1,031 Total | 5 Newly reported | 8 Active

Powell County case:
2,123 Total | 5 Newly reported | 6 Active

Case of Rosebud County:
2,981 | 5 Newly reported | 8 Active

Case of Sweet Grass County:
856 Total | 5 Newly reported | 7 Active

Case of Teton County:
1,453 Total | 5 Newly reported | 4 Active

Toole County Case:
1,350 | 5 Newly reported | 6 Active

Case of Dawson County:
2,584 | 4 Newly Reported | 5 Active

Granite County Case:
624 Overall | 4 Newly Reported | 4 Active

Sheridan County case:
846 Total | 4 Newly Reported | 5 Active

Fallon County case:
722 Total | 3 Newly reported | 2 active

Case of Judith Basin County:
263 Overall | 3 Newly reported | 3 Active

Case of the mineral county:
1,257 Total | 3 Newly reported | 2 active

Pondera County Case:
1,370 | 3 Newly reported | 7 Active

Sanders County Case:
2,345 | 3 Newly reported | 4 Active

Carter County Case:
275 Overall | 1 Newly reported | 1 Active

Liberty County case:
471 Overall | 1 Newly reported | 1 Active

Phillips County case:
1,117 Total | 1 Newly reported | 1 Active

Daniels County Case:
432 Total | 0 Newly reported | 0 Active

Garfield County case:
242 Overall | 0 Newly reported | 0 Active

Case of Golden Valley County:
159 Overall | 0 Newly reported | 0 Active

McCone County Case:
425 Overall | 0 Newly reported | 0 Active

Petroleum County Case:
39 total | 0 Newly reported | 0 Active

Case of Powder River County:
396 Total | 0 Newly reported | 1 Active

Case of Prairie County:
287 Overall | 0 Newly reported | 0 Active

Case of Treasure County:
142 Overall | 0 Newly reported | 0 Active

Case of Wheatland County:
426 Total | 0 Newly reported | 0 Active

Case of the county of Wibaux:
240 Overall | 0 Newly reported | 0 Active

Answers to 25 common questions about the COVID-19 vaccine

Vaccinations against COVID-19 began being administered in the United States on December 14, 2020. The rapid rollout came just over a year after the virus was first identified in November 2019. The impressive speed with which vaccines were developed also left a lot of people with a lot of questions. The questions range from practical – how will I get vaccinated? – to science – how do these vaccines even work?

Keep reading to find answers to 25 common questions about the COVID-19 vaccine.

See striking photos of the tourism industry during COVID-19

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‘It’s a crisis’: Medical association chief warns healthcare system at risk of ‘collapse’ https://davidthompsonthings.com/its-a-crisis-medical-association-chief-warns-healthcare-system-at-risk-of-collapse/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 18:58:09 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/its-a-crisis-medical-association-chief-warns-healthcare-system-at-risk-of-collapse/ The new president of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) said on Wednesday he fears the country’s fragile health care system could deteriorate further without an injection of funds – and a plan to increase the number of doctors and others health professionals. Dr. Alika Lafontaine, an anesthesiologist in Grande Prairie, Alta., and the group’s first […]]]>

The new president of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) said on Wednesday he fears the country’s fragile health care system could deteriorate further without an injection of funds – and a plan to increase the number of doctors and others health professionals.

Dr. Alika Lafontaine, an anesthesiologist in Grande Prairie, Alta., and the group’s first Indigenous chair, told CBC News that health care in Canada is in a “desperate” situation, with quality care severely limited in some areas. from the country.

He pointed to recent emergency room closures in Ottawa, southwestern Ontario, Quebec and other locales and the eye-popping wait times in emergency rooms in major cities like Toronto and Montreal. as terrible precedents undermining Canada’s long-standing promise of timely access to care for all who need it.

“We’ve been saying for a while that we’re concerned about the collapse. And in some places the collapse has already happened,” Lafontaine said.

Dr. Alika Lafontaine, the new president of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA), was born and raised in Treaty 4 territory in Saskatchewan. (Submitted by the Canadian Medical Association)

“All of these things are not normal things for Canadians, so we’re at a tipping point right now. If you can’t access services, it literally means a meltdown.”

Doctors on the front line are at breaking point and have been for almost two and a half years, he said.

“We’re all trained to deal with sharpness. We’re all trained to deal with critical situations. But what’s happening now is way beyond anything we’ve experienced before,” Lafontaine said.

Lafontaine’s comments came after the CMA released a new report on Thursday warning that all provincial and territorial systems are grappling with similar issues, particularly staffing.

The problem is essentially a human resources issue, he said, and there are not enough doctors and nurses available to staff existing facilities, let alone serve a growing population.

One of Lafontaine’s proposed solutions is to introduce what he calls “pan-national licensure,” which would allow doctors to work across the country with fewer regulatory burdens.

This kind of portability would give doctors more flexibility to practice where they are needed most. It could also make it easier for foreign-trained doctors to travel around the country.

He said the current system – in which each province has its own licensing system – is an obstacle.

A “national human resources plan” for health care

A national doctor’s license could provide a single, streamlined process for verifying the credentials of foreign-trained doctors, he said.

“We have to rethink the idea that we can continue with 13 separate health systems that don’t collaborate with each other on a really deep level,” he said.

He said the federal government must convene a meeting with provincial and territorial governments to develop some kind of “health human resource plan” to address staffing gaps and other pressing issues.

In addition to playing a coordinating role, Lafontaine said, Ottawa should also inject more money into the system.

“We definitely need more resources in the system to move forward. But what’s important is where those resources go,” he said, adding that past federal efforts to specifically allocate funds for mental health or home care for the elderly have been successful.

Federal Health Minister Jean-Yves Duclos has hinted that more money will flow into provincial coffers over the next few months, but he said it won’t be a blank cheque.

Duclos has already identified Ottawa’s top five priorities for new health care spending: ending service backlogs, increasing the number of health care workers, better access to primary care, a better health care system long-term and home care services for seniors, more resources for mental health and addictions, and a new push to digitize health data and facilitate more virtual care.

The issue of burdensome licensing for doctors trained outside the country has recently come to a head in several provinces.

Last month, Ontario Health Minister Sylvia Jones asked the province’s regulators to develop plans to register internationally trained doctors and nurses more quickly.

Other provinces, including Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador, are working to streamline their procedures as they welcome Ukrainian doctors fleeing war to their country.

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‘What’s good for the West is good for the rest:’ CWF CEO – Winnipeg Free Press https://davidthompsonthings.com/whats-good-for-the-west-is-good-for-the-rest-cwf-ceo-winnipeg-free-press/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 14:24:51 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/whats-good-for-the-west-is-good-for-the-rest-cwf-ceo-winnipeg-free-press/ Gary Mar, Alberta’s former provincial cabinet minister, has the perfect blend of Alberta/Western Canadian exceptionalism and love of country for his current role as President and CEO. director of the Canada West Foundation. In Winnipeg this week for the think tank’s final board meetings, Mar, 60, is the kind of guy who has personal, funny […]]]>

Gary Mar, Alberta’s former provincial cabinet minister, has the perfect blend of Alberta/Western Canadian exceptionalism and love of country for his current role as President and CEO. director of the Canada West Foundation.

In Winnipeg this week for the think tank’s final board meetings, Mar, 60, is the kind of guy who has personal, funny and loving stories about Gary Doer, the late Ralph Klein and even the late Queen Elizabeth .

He’s also not shy about declaring the CWF to be non-partisan, but in another breath he will denounce what he calls Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s asymmetrical federalism (and also allowed that at one point the FCF derived some works later adopted by the Reform Party of Canada).

MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Gary Mar, president and CEO of the Canada West Foundation, says there’s a lot to unify the interests of all western provinces.

The CWF Foundation turned 50 last year, making it one of Canada’s oldest think tank statesmen.

Funded in part by governments, private donations and a foundation endowment — including contributions from one of its four founders, former cabinet minister Pierre Trudeau and Winnipeg International Airport’s namesake, James A. Richardson — The CWF works on the kind of public policy issues that its 16-person staff thinks are important.

“Our philosophy is that we believe a strong Canadian West is good for a strong Canada,” Mar said. “Or, what’s good for the West is good for the rest.”

But as a general public policy body — rather than say the Fraser Institute which focuses on businesses with its plug-and-play funding focus — it has to choose what it works on.

For the past decade, he has focused on three areas of public policy research: human capital, natural resources and trade or people, products and markets.

To be based in Calgary and led by someone like Mar – who, in addition to his 14 years in cabinet, spent a few years as the province’s official in Washington, then in Asia, based in Hong Kong, then led the Petroleum Services Association of Canada. — that might sound a bit Alberta-centric.

Mar said there are many things that unite the interests of the four western provinces, perhaps none more obvious than transportation infrastructure.

“For example, more than half of the cargo exported from the Port of Vancouver comes from Western Canada,” he said. “We need the infrastructure to make sure the wagons aren’t whistling empty to rush into Vancouver to empty and fill with imports to stock the shelves of Canadian Tire stores.”

“The infrastructure you could build in the three prairie provinces could fill those cars,” he said. “There’s a return on investment (ROI) that you can associate with that.”

Unlike others in Western Canada who “lament that we are landlocked in the Prairies,” Mar is well aware of the significant potential of the Port of Churchill…even for oil exports. (He went on to talk about existing technology that can turn bitumen into solid pucks that can be wrapped in material and injected with air that will float on the ocean and be easily picked up if spilled.)

On the human capital side, CWF recently conducted research on the phenomenon of youth out-migration, an issue of concern to all three Prairie provinces.

Janet Lane, director of CWF’s Center for Human Capital, said that while job opportunities are an important driver of youth emigration, it is not the only one. After focus groups and surveys with young people, she said they discovered it also had to do with whether or not “the place where I live will project the vibe I want to project. on myself”.

She said places like Winnipeg aren’t doing a good enough job of telling the city’s youth stories about attributes of the city that would be appealing to young people.

CWF’s jurisdiction is obviously not the most populous region in the world, but it is strategically important.

“The world is going to need what we produce in this part of the country,” Mar said. there are very few countries in the world that are food secure. Canada is one of the largest net food exporters in the world. It’s something we do really well. »

In addition to “doing a great job” in the area of ​​clean technology and the massive adoption of plant-based protein production in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, Mar also believes that Western Canada still has great opportunities in the fossil fuels, including building more LNG export depots and meeting global demand. for Canadian oil that “we shouldn’t waste”.

martin.cash@freepress.mb.ca

Martin Cash

Martin Cash
Journalist

Martin Cash has written a column and business news for the Free Press since 1989. During those years he wrote through a number of economic cycles and the rise and fall (and rise) of the fortunes of many local businesses .

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Canadian businesses: Recession expectations are far from peaks https://davidthompsonthings.com/canadian-businesses-recession-expectations-are-far-from-peaks/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 16:16:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/canadian-businesses-recession-expectations-are-far-from-peaks/ Real answers from real people Since the spring of 2020, there has been a sharp drop in the number of Canadian business leaders who believe Canada is heading into a recession. TORONTO, CANADA, Sept. 15, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — In The Business Monitor’s latest poll, published by Modus Research, Canadian executives were asked the likelihood of […]]]>

Real answers from real people

Since the spring of 2020, there has been a sharp drop in the number of Canadian business leaders who believe Canada is heading into a recession.

TORONTO, CANADA, Sept. 15, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — In The Business Monitor’s latest poll, published by Modus Research, Canadian executives were asked the likelihood of the Canadian economy falling into recession over the next 12 months . This question was also asked before and at the start of the COVID pandemic.

Full press release available here: https://modusresearch.com/canadian-business-recession-off-peak/
Since the spring of 2020, there has been a sharp drop in the number of Canadian business leaders who believe Canada is heading into a recession. Although national media coverage of the issue has suggested that recession fears are high, they are well below the levels seen at the start of the pandemic.

That said, worries about a recession remain well above pre-COVID levels and are not insignificant.
• Today, 38% of Canadian business leaders think a recession is very likely within the next year.
• Although quite high, this figure is well below the first months of the pandemic. In March and May 2020, 56% and 59% of business leaders, respectively, considered a recession very likely.
• Before the pandemic, high expectations for a recession were only 18%.

These results vary considerably by region. Business leaders in Alberta and the Prairie provinces expect a recession much more than elsewhere in Canada.
Regional percentages indicating that a recession is very likely:
• Grasslands: 57%
• AB: 55%
• Ontario: 36%
• British Columbia: 30%
• Quebec: 29%
• Maritimes: 24%

It is important to recognize what could cause concern about a recession. Canadian business leaders see many risks facing the economy, with household debt, labor shortages and large corporations having too much control over markets topping the list. Concerns about inflation and interest rates are also high. Interestingly, business leaders are relatively indifferent to the Canadian real estate market.
How would you rate each of the following in terms of risks to the Canadian economy over the next 12 months?
(Percentages responding to high risk or the first two boxes.)
• Canadian household debt: 52%
• Large companies control the market too much: 52%
• Labor shortages: 51%
• Inflation: 48%
• Interest rate up: 46%
• Residential real estate market in Canada: 29%

For more information, please visit our site: https://modusresearch.com/canadian-business-recession-off-peak/
Methodology

The survey was conducted from August 19 to September 5 using the Modus Business Panel, Canada’s only probability-based B2B research panel. Since the panel is constructed using random telephone sampling, it is valid to quote the margin of error of this survey. The survey is based on a representative sample of 600 Canadian managers and executives and has a margin of error of +/- 4.0% pts 95 times out of 100. Survey data is weighted by size and region according to latest data from Statistics Canada to help ensure the representativeness of Canadian businesses.

About Modus Research
Founded in 2012, Modus Research is a full-service research agency that provides its clients with actionable insights from Canadian companies based on scientifically representative samples. We are Canada’s B2B search experts.

For more information about this release or The Business Monitor, please contact:
Charlie Graves
President, Modus Research
cgraves at modusresearch dot com

Charles Graves
Modus Research Inc.
write to us here
Visit us on social media:
Twitter

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Climate costs will reach $139 billion by 2050: report https://davidthompsonthings.com/climate-costs-will-reach-139-billion-by-2050-report/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/climate-costs-will-reach-139-billion-by-2050-report/ Zuliana Mawani, water and wastewater operations manager for GHD Canada, said the country is already experiencing water-related climate change issues. Floods and droughts will cost Canada $139 billion over the next 30 years, according to a new report. In August, a report titled Aquanomics was released by global architectural and engineering services firm GHD, which […]]]>

Zuliana Mawani, water and wastewater operations manager for GHD Canada, said the country is already experiencing water-related climate change issues.

Floods and droughts will cost Canada $139 billion over the next 30 years, according to a new report.

In August, a report titled Aquanomics was released by global architectural and engineering services firm GHD, which highlights how the Canadian economy will be impacted by climate-related water challenges in the over the next few decades.

Zuliana Mawani, water and wastewater operations manager for GHD Canada, said the country is already experiencing water-related climate change issues.

“We see the displaced people and the direct damage to infrastructure,” Mawani said.

Due to climate change, the group estimates losses at $139 billion between 2022 and 2050. Flooding alone is expected to cost the Canadian economy more than $30 billion by 2050.

“It’s just based on droughts, floods and storms in five major sectors of the economy,” Mawani said.

Manufacturing and distribution will be the hardest hit, according to the report, with an expected loss of $50 billion, while consumer goods and fast-moving retail are expected to lose $20 billion. The banking and insurance sector will lose $16 billion while energy and utilities will lose $11 billion. Agriculture will take a hit of $3 billion, according to the report.

“If you think about the distribution of goods, the drought interrupts water transport,” Mawani said.

Flooding can also lead to closures, the expert said, adding that flooding in British Columbia last year led to major closures of transportation corridors.

Canada has taken a proactive approach to climate change, Mawani said, adding that it is something that should have started many years ago because until now all levels of government have declared a climate emergency. .

Academic institutions and private industries have also recognized that the country is in a climate emergency, which helps focus efforts and funding in the right areas, Mawani said.

The country must adapt to climate change, the expert said, by reviewing infrastructure plans and building in line with the coming changes. Infrastructure that already exists must be optimized to withstand climate change and projects that can have the most impact must be prioritized, Mawani said.

Across Canada, different regions will experience climate challenges differently. The Prairie provinces, where agriculture is an important part of the economy, could be hit hardest by droughts and floods, Mawani said.

“When we look at agriculture as an industry, it requires more water than any other industry, so droughts can have a very, very big impact,” Mawani said.

“If a farmer loses the productivity of his land for a year, his access to food supply chains [is] huge. But the following year, the land may still not be viable to produce, and so we see these cumulative effects cascading.

The report also examined the economic challenges of water-related disasters in seven other countries, all of which are vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.

“It’s interesting in there, [of] Of all the country types we looked at, Canada’s large land mass combined with its low population density actually contributes to water-related risk having a lower impact than the other countries in the study. But saying that, the numbers are [still] staggering,” Mawani said.

The country is already experiencing the effects of climate change, so the report suggests prioritizing small projects over large ones as time is running out. Infrastructure projects that use nature are the best choice, the report reads.

According to the Canadian Climate Institute, previous studies done on flooding in Alberta show that the province lacks consistent flood planning and mapping to manage large weather events.

Maps of floods in the country only cover half of the properties and assets, and these maps are on average more than 20 years old.

Alberta has faced several major weather events that have caused significant damage in recent years, with five of the 10 costliest disasters occurring in Alberta, including the 2013 southern Alberta floods and the Fort McMurray in 2020.

According to the Canadian Climate Institute’s Underwater report, released last year, Alberta, Quebec and Ontario will bear the largest overall costs of climate change damage to their roads because these are the regions with the most extensive road networks. By mid-century, climate change-induced damage will cost these provinces hundreds of millions of additional dollars to maintain their road networks, under the low-emissions scenario, the report said.

Rail lines will also be impacted by climate change, with damage estimated between $1 million and $180 million per year depending on the timing and emissions scenario, according to the report.

Power transmission lines could suffer damage worth $2.4 billion a year by mid-century due to climate change and about $3.6 billion a year by the end of the century. end of the century in a high-emission scenario, while in a low-emission scenario, damages would average $1.8 billion per year.

To bring infrastructure across the country up to a standard to be more resilient to climate disasters, such as flooding, the report’s estimates say it could cost the country $250 billion.

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UPDATE: Multiple casualties after James Smith Cree Nation stabbing reported https://davidthompsonthings.com/update-multiple-casualties-after-james-smith-cree-nation-stabbing-reported/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 22:37:15 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/update-multiple-casualties-after-james-smith-cree-nation-stabbing-reported/ Update 4:30 p.m. Law enforcement in the three prairie provinces are on high alert, looking for two men suspected of killing multiple people. RCMP allege Damien Sanderson and Myles Sanderson are charged with stabbing to death 10 people and injuring 15 others in James Smith Cree Nation and Weldon, in a shooting Sunday. The RCMP […]]]>

Update 4:30 p.m.

Law enforcement in the three prairie provinces are on high alert, looking for two men suspected of killing multiple people. RCMP allege Damien Sanderson and Myles Sanderson are charged with stabbing to death 10 people and injuring 15 others in James Smith Cree Nation and Weldon, in a shooting Sunday. The RCMP are investigating 13 different crime scenes.

Earlier today, authorities said they received a report that the suspects may be traveling to Regina in the Arcola Ave area around shortly before noon in a black Nissan Rogue with the SK 119 MPI license.

Regina Police Chief Evan Bray said police believe the suspects are in the capital and are calling on anyone with information about their whereabouts to come forward.

RCMP said it appears some of the stabbing victims were targeted or were random victims.

“It’s horrific what happened in our province today,” said RCMP Assistant Commissioner Rhonda Blackmore.

Police are asking the public to take precautions and consider sheltering in place. Don’t leave a safe place. DO NOT APPROACH suspects. Don’t pick up hitchhikers. Report suspicious people, emergencies or information to 9-1-1. Do not disclose police locations.

—–

Update 12:21 p.m.

Saskatchewan RCMP say they received a report that the suspects may be traveling in the Arcola Avenue area around 11:45 a.m. in Regina, Saskatchewan in a black Nissan Rogue with the SK 119 MPI license.

If in the Regina area, authorities are asking the public to take precautions and consider sheltering in place. Don’t leave a safe place. DO NOT APPROACH suspicious people. Do not pick up hitchhiking hikers. Report suspicious people, emergencies or information to 9-1-1. Do not disclose police locations.

As the suspects are at large, we have also requested that the alert be extended to Manitoba and Alberta.

The RCMP says it will continue to provide updates as they become available.

UPDATE 10:01 – RCMP have released information that there are multiple victims, in multiple locations, including the Cree Nation of James Smith and Weldon. The victims may have been attacked randomly.

Suspects Damien Sanderson and Myles Sanderson remain at large under what is now a provincial alert.

Saskatchewan RCMP have been advised by members of the public that an incorrect photo has been released of Myles Sanderson.

Based on this information, further investigation took place and we have now included the attached updated description and photograph of Myles Sanderson.

Damien Sanderson is 5-foot-7 and 155 pounds with black hair and brown eyes.

Myles Sanderson is 6ft 1in and weighs 240lbs with brown hair and eyes. See new photo.

Dangerous Person Alert Schedule

7:14 a.m., Sunday, September 4, 2022: Melfort RCMP used the SaskAlert system to send out an incident notification on the James Smith Cree Nation after receiving multiple calls indicating multiple stabbings had occurred.

7:57 a.m.: the following updated photos and information have been released: Updated Dangerous Person Alert issued by Melfort RCMP for multiple stabbings against James Smith Cree Nation. The suspects are Damien Sanderson and Myles Sanderson. Damien Sanderson is 5’7″ tall and weighs 155 pounds, has black hair and brown eyes. Myles Sanderson is 6’1″, 200 lbs, has black hair and brown eyes.

8:15 a.m.: The information has been updated to include that the suspects may be in black Nissan Rogue with license plate SK 119 MPI. With this news release, the RCMP said this was a province-wide alert.

If you are in the area, immediately seek shelter/shelter in place. Don’t leave a safe place. Exercise caution when allowing others to enter your residence. DO NOT APPROACH suspicious people. Do not pick up hitchhiking hikers. Report suspicious people, emergencies or information to 9-1-1. Do not disclose police locations.

MBC Radio News is following this story and will post updates as they become available.

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New ‘rage index’ finds Prairie provinces angrier than other jurisdictions in Canada https://davidthompsonthings.com/new-rage-index-finds-prairie-provinces-angrier-than-other-jurisdictions-in-canada/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 17:47:05 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/new-rage-index-finds-prairie-provinces-angrier-than-other-jurisdictions-in-canada/ A Toronto-based research firm has launched what it calls its “Rage Index,” which looks at the issues that are of most concern to Canadians right now. Pollara Strategic Insights launched the monthly Rage Index on Monday and found that the topics that anger the majority of Canadians are recent news, inflation and the truck convoy. […]]]>

A Toronto-based research firm has launched what it calls its “Rage Index,” which looks at the issues that are of most concern to Canadians right now.

Pollara Strategic Insights launched the monthly Rage Index on Monday and found that the topics that anger the majority of Canadians are recent news, inflation and the truck convoy.

“Right now, inflation and gas prices are the highest,” said Dan Arnold, chief strategy officer at Pollara.

“You have at least eight out of 10 people who are somewhat angry about this, and four out of 10 who are ‘very angry,'” he said.

The company surveyed approximately 2,000 Canadians between July 25 and August 2 to complete the survey.

The Rage Index found that the Prairie provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba were the most frustrated, with 55% of respondents being generally “annoyed” or “angry” about the current situation in Canada.

Quebec seems to be the least disturbed, with 43% of respondents saying they are angry or bored.

Alberta was the second most angry province, according to respondents, with 53% saying they were angry, followed by Ontario at 51%, and followed by the Atlantic provinces and British Columbia which were tied with 49%.

In general, men and women reported being equally angry about living conditions in Canada, while middle-aged Canadians were the age group that reported the highest levels of anger.

Low-income and Canadian-born people were also angrier than their counterparts, according to the poll.

The Rage Index has a margin of error of 2.2%, 19 times out of 20, according to Pollara.

The full survey report is available on the Pollara Strategic Insights website.

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Floods in Pakistan have killed more than 1,000 people. It’s called a climate catastrophe https://davidthompsonthings.com/floods-in-pakistan-have-killed-more-than-1000-people-its-called-a-climate-catastrophe/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 16:44:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/floods-in-pakistan-have-killed-more-than-1000-people-its-called-a-climate-catastrophe/ ISLAMABAD — The death toll from widespread flooding in Pakistan has topped 1,000 since mid-June, officials said on Sunday, as the country’s climate minister called the deadly monsoon season a “serious climate disaster”. . Flash flooding caused by heavy rains washed away villages and crops as soldiers and rescue workers evacuated stranded residents to the […]]]>

ISLAMABAD — The death toll from widespread flooding in Pakistan has topped 1,000 since mid-June, officials said on Sunday, as the country’s climate minister called the deadly monsoon season a “serious climate disaster”. .

Flash flooding caused by heavy rains washed away villages and crops as soldiers and rescue workers evacuated stranded residents to the safety of relief camps and provided food for thousands of displaced Pakistanis.

Pakistan’s National Disaster Management Authority reported that the death toll since the monsoon season started earlier than normal this year – in mid-June – has reached 1,033 people after further deaths were reported in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and southern Sindh provinces.

Sherry Rehman, a Pakistani senator and the country’s top climate official, said in a video posted to Twitter that Pakistan is experiencing a “serious climate catastrophe, one of the most difficult in a decade”.

“We are right now at ground zero on the front line of extreme weather events, in a relentless cascade of heat waves, wildfires, flash floods, multiple glacial lake outbursts, flooding and now the monstrous monsoon of the decade is wreaking havoc – stop the havoc across the country,” she said. The filmed statement was retweeted by the country’s ambassador to the European Union.

Floods from the Swat River have affected the northwestern province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, where tens of thousands of people – particularly in Charsadda and Nowshehra districts – have been evacuated from their homes to relief camps set up in government buildings. Many have also taken refuge on the roadsides, said Kamran Bangash, a spokesman for the provincial government.

Bangash said some 180,000 people had been evacuated from Charsadda and 150,000 from villages in Nowshehra district.

Khaista Rehman, 55, unrelated to the climate minister, took refuge with his wife and three children on the edge of the Islamabad-Peshawar highway after his house in Charsadda was submerged overnight.

“Thank goodness we are safe now on this fairly high road compared to the flooded area,” he said. “Our crops have disappeared and our house is destroyed, but I am grateful to Allah that we are alive and I will start life again with my sons.”

The unprecedented monsoon season affected all four provinces of the country. Nearly 300,000 homes have been destroyed, many roads rendered impassable and power cuts have become widespread, affecting millions of people.

Pope Francis said on Sunday that he wanted to ensure his “proximity to the people of Pakistan hit by floods of disastrous proportions”. Speaking during a pilgrimage to the Italian city of L’Aquila, hit by a deadly earthquake in 2009, Francis said he prayed “for the many victims, for the injured and evacuated, and that international solidarity be prompt and generous”.

Rehman told Turkish media TRT World that by the time the rains recede, “we may well have a quarter or a third of Pakistan under water.”

“This is something that is a global crisis and of course we will need better planning and sustainable development on the ground. … We will need climate resilient crops as well as structures,” he said. she declared.

In May, Rehman told BBC Newshour that both the north and south of the country were witnessing extreme weather events due to rising temperatures. “So in the north right now we’re having what’s called glacial lake flooding, which we have a lot of because Pakistan has the most glaciers outside of the polar region.”

The government has deployed troops to assist civil authorities in rescue and relief operations across the country. The Pakistani army also said in a statement that it had airlifted 22 trapped tourists to a valley in the north of the country to bring them to safety.

Prime Minister Shabaz Sharif visited flood victims in the city of Jafferabad in Balochistan. He vowed that the government would provide housing for anyone who lost their homes.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Deputy Premier hears about need for skilled trades and child care in Grande Prairie https://davidthompsonthings.com/deputy-premier-hears-about-need-for-skilled-trades-and-child-care-in-grande-prairie/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 01:07:25 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/deputy-premier-hears-about-need-for-skilled-trades-and-child-care-in-grande-prairie/ Deputy Premier Chrystia Freeland made an unexpected stop in Grande Prairie on Friday to meet with local farmers, skilled artisans from Northwestern Polytechnic and Mayor Jackie Clayton. Freeland, who was born and raised in Peace River, says she wanted to visit the land of peace to hear directly from people involved in our local industries. […]]]>

Deputy Premier Chrystia Freeland made an unexpected stop in Grande Prairie on Friday to meet with local farmers, skilled artisans from Northwestern Polytechnic and Mayor Jackie Clayton. Freeland, who was born and raised in Peace River, says she wanted to visit the land of peace to hear directly from people involved in our local industries.

“I really believe that to do my job properly, I have to go out and talk to really hard working people; talk to the people who are really building Canada and the Canadian economy and talk to them myself.

“It was really important for me to come to northern Alberta, to return to where I was born and where I grew up,” continues Freeland. “I think the people you grew up with, they tell you the truth.”

Freeland adds that she would also not hesitate to introduce this part of Canada to the rest of the country, knowing that it can be difficult to attract people to the region if they do not know what it has to offer. to offer.

Much of Friday’s discussion revolved around the need for more skilled workers to address labor shortages. Freeland says she will take away from the conversations an understanding of the need to invest in skilled trades training, sharing an anecdote about a local apprentice who told her he was constantly responding to job postings.

“It tells me that there are a lot of people who need skilled tradespeople. I am truly committed to working with places like Northwestern Polytechnic to ensure that we provide the support and training that Canadians and the Canadian economy need.

One area she recognizes the federal government can better advocate for is better recognition of qualifications between provinces. He was told that Mayor Clayton would help him by giving him a list of qualifications that would help our area the most.

“It’s something that costs us nothing at all and at a time when we have labor shortages across the country, I think it’s a way to help everyone.”

It also led to a discussion that childcare goes hand in hand with working people. Freeland says reducing dependent child care fees by 50% in some provinces is a strategy to improve the situation, saying work is still ongoing.

“People have told me how important it is, for example, for people who want to study to be an apprentice… I’ve long believed that the Canadian economy needs apprenticeship and child care. affordable children; it will stimulate jobs and growth.

As expected, farmers spoke to the Deputy Prime Minister about the federal government’s recent announcement of a fertilizer emissions reduction target aimed at reducing emissions from the application of fertilizers. 30% from 2020 levels by 2030. She said she was clear with them that this is a goal and not an obligation, adding that she knows Canadian farmers are smart business people.

“They are already very smart in their use of fertilizers. They are so careful about the inputs they use; they run businesses and they don’t want to spend a penny more on inputs than they need.

Freeland says she will bring back to Ottawa the ideas and feedback given to her during her multi-city tour this summer.

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