The Prairie Provinces – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 03:50:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://davidthompsonthings.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png The Prairie Provinces – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ 32 32 Prime Minister Blames Trudeau for Low Immunization Rates in the North and Aboriginals in Saskatchewan https://davidthompsonthings.com/prime-minister-blames-trudeau-for-low-immunization-rates-in-the-north-and-aboriginals-in-saskatchewan/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/prime-minister-blames-trudeau-for-low-immunization-rates-in-the-north-and-aboriginals-in-saskatchewan/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 03:50:23 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/prime-minister-blames-trudeau-for-low-immunization-rates-in-the-north-and-aboriginals-in-saskatchewan/ Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe (Herald file photo) Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe made no effort at a post-election press conference Tuesday in Regina, saying Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has “a role to play” when it comes to the weak vaccination rate in northern and aboriginal communities. “Our Far North and our Indigenous communities have an immunization […]]]>

Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe made no effort at a post-election press conference Tuesday in Regina, saying Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has “a role to play” when it comes to the weak vaccination rate in northern and aboriginal communities.

“Our Far North and our Indigenous communities have an immunization rate of less than 50% – some as low as 23%,” Moe said.

“This is an area where we have some of the highest COVID transmissions in the province and it is an area of ​​exclusive federal jurisdiction. “

Moe said the province has “worked hard, throughout this pandemic” to tackle low vaccination rates in northern and Indigenous communities.

The Premier noted that Saskatchewan allocates 14% of vaccines received in the early stages of the pandemic to Indigenous Services Canada.

He said the province has done everything possible to try to increase vaccination in communities under federal jurisdiction.

“We have partnered with Indigenous Services Canada to broadcast radio news in a number of Indigenous languages ​​so people can understand why and where vaccines are available,” Moe said.

“We have gone so far beyond our provincial jurisdiction – in a number of northern communities – by providing door-to-door opportunities for immunizations.

“This is ultimately an area where we have seen the Premier raise the vaccination rate in Saskatchewan as being way too low. I would say the Prime Minister has a role to play in this regard. “

Trudeau “feels really bad” for being fully immunized in Saskatchewan.

Justin Trudeau speaks at a 2019 city hall rally in Saskatoon. Photo by Jason Kerr / Prince Albert Daily Herald

Moe’s criticisms are in response to comments made by Trudeau while campaigning in British Columbia, where the premier said he felt “really bad” for fully vaccinated Saskatchewanians.

During a campaign stop in Richmond on September 14, Trudeau blamed Moe and Alberta Premier Jason Kenney for low vaccination rates in the Prairie provinces.

Trudeau said the imposition of vaccine requirements for government employees and vaccine passport warrants is causing hesitant people to roll up their sleeves – but neither Alberta nor Saskatchewan had yet implemented vaccine passports.

“Getting the vaccine is the way to get through this… This fourth wave is a wave mostly of people who have chosen not to be vaccinated. In Alberta, Saskatchewan, millions of people did the right thing and got vaccinated, ”Trudeau said.

“I feel bad, really bad, for the people of Alberta and Saskatchewan who came together to do the right thing.

Trudeau said that although Saskatchewan and Alberta have a proportionately lower number of people vaccinated than elsewhere in Canada, the majority of people in both provinces are vaccinated.

“Due to leadership that will not commit to keeping them safe the right way or even protecting the economy the right way, they face greater risks due to canceled surgeries,” said Trudeau.

“They face emergency public health restrictions that may need to be put in place. “

Trudeau has vowed to “foot the bill” for vaccine passports to make it easier for provinces to move these mandates forward.

“I don’t think any Albertan or Saskatchewanian watching this election would think that Erin O’Toole – who can’t even get his own candidates vaccinated – would do better for them than their current premiers.”

Saskatchewan reinstated a province-wide mask mandate on September 17 and announced mandatory vaccination policies effective October 1. A QR code is now available to residents as proof of vaccination.

Northern Saskatchewan’s health care system ‘on the brink’

NITHA medical officer of health Nnamdi Ndubuka. Photo courtesy of the Saskatchewan Medical Association / Nnamdi Ndubuka.

But Moe said areas that are furthest behind in immunization are under federal jurisdiction.

Northern InterTribal Health Authority (NITHA) medical officer of health, Nnamdi Ndubuka, told the Prince Albert Daily Herald on September 8 that the health care system was “on the brink”.

Ndubuka said healthcare workers in northern Saskatchewan are overworked – some going on stress leave and others on sick leave.

“It tells you that we are on the brink,” Ndubuka said.

Ndubuka sent letters to First Nations governments encouraging vaccination mandates for staff and said he supported “all measures” to increase vaccination rates.

The province was meeting with northern and indigenous leaders to find solutions while the premier was busy campaigning in an unwanted election, Moe said.

He called on Trudeau to do more and work with the province to resolve the issue.

“(Trudeau) has many communities across this province that are under exclusive federal jurisdiction. The province is committed to doing what we can to increase our immunization rates in these areas, ”said Moe.

“We have been working with community leaders on how we can continue to increase these immunization rates – I would say with some success in some communities. This must continue to repeat itself in other communities.

Moe said that to achieve this goal, Saskatchewan needs the “full support of the federal government” to lower immunization rates in the Far North and in Indigenous communities.

“I suspect that’s the case across Canada,” Moe said.

“I suspect the federal government has been aware of this throughout this pandemic – throughout its decision to call an election as we Canadians still manage our way through this pandemic.”

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In Praise of Stasis, Special Edition of the Canadian Elections https://davidthompsonthings.com/in-praise-of-stasis-special-edition-of-the-canadian-elections/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/in-praise-of-stasis-special-edition-of-the-canadian-elections/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 23:48:02 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/in-praise-of-stasis-special-edition-of-the-canadian-elections/ Stasis is perhaps an underestimated virtue in political life. We know the virtue of stasis in our private lives, because selling the house and divorcing the spouse and sending the children away rarely seems, on second thought, a good idea. But there is also something to be said for praising the stasis in our public […]]]>

Stasis is perhaps an underestimated virtue in political life. We know the virtue of stasis in our private lives, because selling the house and divorcing the spouse and sending the children away rarely seems, on second thought, a good idea. But there is also something to be said for praising the stasis in our public life. Election rhetoric in democracies almost always advocates change, its necessity and its benefits, but there are times when a completely static result faithfully represents the opinions and even, in a way, the evanescent mood of a nation. , when you continue in the same way as before is the best result to want. This thought (in itself somewhat static) is inspired by the result of the early federal elections on Monday in Canada, which, after many back and forths, with moments of momentum and momentum stopped on all sides, came to an end. ended with almost exactly the same legislature he started with. Justin Trudeau’s Liberal Party has won the most seats and will form its third consecutive government, although it is still not the majority government it sought when Trudeau called the election a month ago; the Tories, now under the leadership of Erin O’Toole, a more progressive leader than her immediate predecessors, have the second-highest number of seats and a slightly larger share of the popular vote, due to their near-monopoly on the vote in the western provinces; Canadian oddity, the Bloc Québécois, separatist party which nevertheless sits in the federal Parliament, found itself in third place, with thirty-four seats, all in Quebec; and the New Democratic Left Party, led by the much-loved Jagmeet Singh, came fourth. (The final tally is not yet known, but the Conservatives’ advantage in the popular vote, which will likely end at around one percent, is real, if somewhat misleading: the center-left vote, the Liberals and the NPD together is still much broader than the center-right vote, and, anyway, a parliamentary system is the product of a series of local, not national, elections.)

Those with a long memory of the cycles of history may even see repeats in a larger spiral. In 1974, another Liberal leader named Trudeau sought a majority government against a popular NDP leader named David Lewis and a sober but progressive Conservative leader named Robert Stanfield, and made his way to the majority. Although Pierre Trudeau, the father of Justin Trudeau, was imagined in America as a much appreciated and charismatic leader, at the time he was unpopular in the press or the “media”, as Marshall McLuhan, another Canadian, had. recently popularized as his son is now: before the 1974 election, Toronto’s three dailies all supported the opposition. Yet fifty years ago the basic lines of Canadian politics were already evident. This election featured a powerful Liberal Party with strongholds in Montreal and Toronto, but not many in the western Prairie Provinces, and a popular Social Democratic figure but, due to the first past the post system, powerless in Lewis, with a few fringe politicians by his side. In 1974, Justin was a two-year-old, pictured swinging happily from his parents’ hands on the steps of Parliament. While a lot has changed – then no one could easily have imagined a Sikh leader of a major Canadian political party like Singh is – a lot remains the same. Trudeau son, perfectly bilingual and representing a Montreal riding, still supports Quebec for federalism, as his father did. The historic task of the Liberal Party of Canada, which the Trudeaus and the much forgotten but effective Jean Chrétien have accomplished, is to keep Quebec in confederation, a goal to which (although it has happened so slowly that few Canadians really see it) he essentially succeeded, shifting the independence of Quebec and the break-up of the country from an imminent threat to a now distant eventuality.

As far as there was a problem in this election, it meandered and turned COVID-19 and the political responses to it, recalling that no one understood the policy of the pandemic, which betrays even the leaders who seem to have approached it in the most responsible way. Canada under Trudeau got off to a good start, appearing to do better than the United States in the horrific first months, even leading this hopeful expat to believe that Canada’s social capital was the foundation for a productive response. But that took a dark turn on the downside last winter, when Montreal and Toronto, in particular, were sealed off, even as New York and Boston cautiously began to reopen, then seemed to get even worse when the vaccines were rolled out and Canada appeared to be far behind the United States and Europe in their distribution. (The general feeling was that Canada had made a serious mistake in giving up vaccine production itself, leaving it a contender rather than a vaccine manufacturer.)

At this point, however, things have turned out again, as they insist on in this unprecedented and twisted story. As anti-vax propaganda and the sheer irrationality of the Trumpist right flooded America, Canada surged in the proportion of citizens vaccinated; nearly seventy percent of the population is now fully immunized. (A new far-right group, the People’s Party of Canada, reflected anti-vax fury, and protesters appeared at election rallies – earlier this month in Ontario a small crowd, apparently inspired by the Party, threw stones – or, this being Canada, gravel – at Trudeau.)

The conservative premiers, equivalent to the governors, of the western provinces tried to apply a lighter, more libertarian touch to the pandemic, by reopening prematurely this summer, with largely catastrophic results. Alberta has called a health care emergency, and last week Premier Jason Kenney actually apologized for his conduct, saying he would order passports for vaccines and other restrictions – not having learned the Trumpist lesson of overtaking and challenging anyone to do anything about it. (There is no Murdoch press or television in Canada, which may seem like a secondary thought, but is in fact, as the experience of Britain, the United States and Australia shows , actually a primary thought.) It may be that Alberta’s apology, with its implicit warning of the dangers of a reckless right-wing government, helped seal the outcome in the major cities of the East for Trudeau. The larger moral seems to be that no one can ride the pandemic black cloud with any certainty or knowledge.

The other underlying regularity of the election is the largest, easily overlooked, that perhaps rules politics in all liberal democracies now, and that is the huge and ever-growing disjunction between urban and rural voters. Toronto and Montreal are solid blocks of liberal red; the rest of the countryside remains largely more to the right, repeating the same pattern found in France, Great Britain and the United States. (This is not an inevitable trend in Canada: The Social Democratic Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, the predecessor of the NDP, which is generally credited with the early efforts to bring national medicare to Canada, had its roots in the days of depression in rural areas and agrarian movements in the West.)

To praise stasis is to do the sort of thing that Canadians dislike, especially when it comes to expatriate Canadians, as condescending or appearing not to take the country’s problems – to climate change devastation in the North in the news Insufficient repentance for the wrongs committed against Indigenous peoples in so-called residential schools – seriously enough. The tone of the next day in Canadian media seemed, at least to this Montreal expat, strangely sour and cynical: Trudeau was criticized a lot for calling the election two years before he was, during the pandemic – when it was. was his right, and in a sense his duty, as a parliamentary politician, to try to turn a minority into a majority. (Canadian leaders must call an election every four years, but are free to gamble and do so sooner.) A shout out to LGBTQ voters in his not quite concession speech. There were also a lot of imprecations against the unnecessary stasis which is, after all, a fair portrait of the country, and which, paradoxically, has so far proved no particular obstacle to effective administration, which is the one of the reasons why it seemed to some frivolous for Trudeau to have called for a vote.

Of course, the ironic consequence of the attacks on Trudeau for triggering this election is that if he doesn’t call another for another four years, his critics will have a hard time condemning him for not doing so, after having thus condemned him strongly for having called this one. Stasis is locked. Yet, under any of the possible candidates, Canada would have had a decent, sane and responsible government: a low bar, yes, but the one we learned is not too low to defeat a democracy. Canada remains a lucky country, but not complacent. Much of his good fortune is that he constantly refuses to recognize how lucky he is.


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“Siding is an absolute necessity for the culture in Alberta” https://davidthompsonthings.com/siding-is-an-absolute-necessity-for-the-culture-in-alberta/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/siding-is-an-absolute-necessity-for-the-culture-in-alberta/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 12:17:52 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/siding-is-an-absolute-necessity-for-the-culture-in-alberta/ Big Marble Farms supplies a significant portion of the Canadian Prairie provinces with fresh vegetables. A remarkable achievement because greenhouse cultivation in the harsh climate here is a real challenge. Coverings on the roof of the greenhouse are an absolute requirement for success. When asked what would happen if you had to forgo the use […]]]>

Big Marble Farms supplies a significant portion of the Canadian Prairie provinces with fresh vegetables. A remarkable achievement because greenhouse cultivation in the harsh climate here is a real challenge. Coverings on the roof of the greenhouse are an absolute requirement for success.

When asked what would happen if you had to forgo the use of pavers, Ryan Cramer, CEO of Big Marble Farms, smiled. “It’s quite impossible. Not using coatings is not an option. It would be detrimental. We have been using coatings from the very beginning. The Medicine Hat company was founded a dozen years ago. Ryan has a partnership with his father and uncle. The company is experiencing significant growth. It was significantly expanded last year and now has 55 acres of glass.

“We grow tomatoes and cucumbers, and in addition, we sell products grown by colleagues, such as peppers, lettuce and eggplants. These are destined for the domestic market which, in addition to Alberta, includes Manitoba and Saskatchewan. We can sell the vegetables as local produce in the Prairie provinces, ”he says.

Culture all year round
The company was the first in the region to install assimilation lighting. This makes cultivation possible all year round. The climate of the Prairies is a real challenge in this regard. “We grow our crops as a semi-dessert: little rain and extreme temperatures of up to 40 ° C in summer and down to -40 ° C in winter. In addition, the temperatures are very variable, they can go up to + 12 ° C in winter. This means that we must constantly be flexible to meet these conditions. “
Frost forms on the windows in winter. This is above the energy screen and in itself is not necessarily a problem. However, the ice melts at some point and the water drops then become a challenge.

Early coating
“After the harsh winter, temperatures can go up to 30 ° C, starting in May; that means we have to apply coatings at the start of the year. We consider outdoor temperatures up to 35 ° C to be manageable. The temperature inside the greenhouse would then be around 28 ° C. But above 35 ° C things get difficult. The 24 hour temperature would then rise too much, causing set problems and smaller than desirable leaves, ”he says. But the business is well prepared. The combination of plasters, a misting system and an energy screen makes it possible to effectively manage the greenhouse climate.

Big Marble Farms has always used siding. “In the past, it was ReduSol. While not bad, it still took away too much light. When ReduHeat and ReduFuse became available in the market, we started to experiment on our own. We have prepared a mixture of the two coatings to achieve the right result. When ReduFuse IR was introduced, this was no longer necessary. It is a very good coating. Tailored. It cuts off harmful rays and diffuses light. It’s the best of both worlds.

He applies this coating to greenhouse sections with standard glass. However, some 40 acres are now covered with diffuse glass. ReduHeat is used here.

Fine tuning
“We are constantly refining our operations. We like to apply a thin layer in April, around 50% of the normal concentration. This is because we are aiming for as much light as possible. Before the heat of summer, we refuel.

Besides the heat, the extremely low humidity of the prairie climate also affects crops. Sometimes the relative humidity is only 10% – greenhouse crops are barely able to withstand such conditions. But Ryan takes good care of his plants. “We can handle it,” he said. “Coatings lower the temperature. Misting creates a good climate and curtains are in place to handle extreme situations and protect young plants in August / September. Thus, the company grows tasty and healthy vegetables for the whole region.

For more information:
ReduSystems
+31 (0) 13 507 53 99
sales@redusystems.com
www.redusystems.com


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Election Results Begin to Fall as Polling Stations Close in Atlantic Canada | national https://davidthompsonthings.com/election-results-begin-to-fall-as-polling-stations-close-in-atlantic-canada-national/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/election-results-begin-to-fall-as-polling-stations-close-in-atlantic-canada-national/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 00:13:22 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/election-results-begin-to-fall-as-polling-stations-close-in-atlantic-canada-national/ OTTAWA – Polling stations have closed in Atlantic Canada, kicking off what should be a fierce end to the federal election campaign. The very early results began to be felt, with the Liberals appearing ready to retain their dominant position in the four easternmost provinces, although some competitions were very close. There are 32 ridings […]]]>

OTTAWA – Polling stations have closed in Atlantic Canada, kicking off what should be a fierce end to the federal election campaign.

The very early results began to be felt, with the Liberals appearing ready to retain their dominant position in the four easternmost provinces, although some competitions were very close.

There are 32 ridings up for grabs in the region. The Liberals held 27 before the election, including Fredericton, New Brunswick, where Green Party-elected Jenica Atwin defected from the Liberals.

The Conservatives held four Atlantic seats and the NDP held one.

The first results were the Liberals leading in 14 Atlantic ridings, the Conservatives in four and the NDP in one.

With polls suggesting a stalemate across Canada between the Liberals and the Conservatives, neither within the reach of a majority, each of the country’s 338 ridings will count.

Trudeau ended his minority Liberal government on August 15, just under two years after Canadians reduced the Liberals to a minority for the first time.

He argued that Canada is at a pivotal point in history and that Canadians deserve a chance to decide how they want to end the fight against COVID-19 and rebuild the shattered economy.

But the timing of his election call, coming as a fourth wave of the novel coronavirus began to sweep the country, quickly undermined the goodwill Trudeau had built among Canadians for his government’s handling of the pandemic over the years. 18 months previous.

And it gave rival leaders an opening to attack Trudeau’s character, portraying him as a selfish egotist who cannot be trusted to put the interests of Canadians ahead of his personal ambition for a majority.

During the day on Monday, Elections Canada reported a handful of disruptions at polling stations across the country, including a protest led by Indigenous people and election workers failing to show up, as millions of Canadians marched. voted in the country’s first pandemic election.

While the majority of polling stations opened on time and without incident, Elections Canada spokeswoman Diane Benson said issues had been reported with several sites in Ontario and Western Canada, resulting in the late opening of certain offices or the need to relocate.

These included a polling station in the constituency of Brantford-Brant, southwest of Toronto, which had to be relocated following a protest organized by the Haudenosaunee Confederacy Chiefs Council.

The council last week voted against setting up a polling station on what it considers its traditional territory, calling it a violation of the treaty and encouraging members not to vote.

The Turtle Island News newspaper reported that protesters blocked all three entrances to the polling station before a standoff erupted with Six Nations police.

The newspaper said the polling station was removed from the reserve following negotiations between the two sides.

“We are aware that the Haudenosaunee Confederacy Chiefs Council protest disrupted voting at a polling station in Brantford-Brant before the polling station could be moved,” Benson said in an email.

Benson also reported that poll workers did not show up at two polling stations in the Ontario riding of Kenora, near the border with Manitoba. Waiting workers from other parts of the region were dispatched to open polling stations by mid-afternoon.

Two polling stations in First Nations in the Alberta constituency of Grand Prairie-Mackenzie also opened late due to the inability of staff to enter locked buildings. Polling stations have since opened.

Elections Canada also knew that a polling station in the community of Yekooche in British Columbia, in the riding of Skeena-Bulkley Valley, had not opened.

Benson also reported that special arrangements have been made, with the approval of local campaigns, for several polling stations in the Toronto ridings of Eglinton-Lawrence and University-Rosedale to manage the flow of voters while respecting the security measures in place.

“We are aware of an interruption in voting services at several polling stations in Davenport,” she added. “Voting resumed.”

The isolated disruptions came as Canada’s top party leaders joined millions of residents who voted in the country’s first pandemic election, which culminated on Monday as Canadians from coast to coast to coast gathered. went to the polls.

Elections Canada said nearly 6.8 million people voted early, most early voting more than a week ago, and the rest by special ballots dropped by mail or at Elections Canada offices .

Canada has over 30 million eligible voters.

Elections Canada told The Canadian Press that it is having intermittent problems with a search tool on its website that lets voters know which polling station to go to based on their postal code. The agency urged voters to check their voting cards or call Elections Canada directly if they didn’t know where to go.

Benson said Elections Canada was also investigating high call volumes in some electoral districts, although it did not specify which ridings were affected.

Elections Canada previously warned that the pandemic could lead to longer wait times for voters compared to previous elections.

Public health protocols involve keeping people at bay and collecting additional information for contact tracing purposes, which could take longer.

The polling stations themselves were also likely to be further away, as many schools and landlords chose not to accommodate crowds of voters during the fourth wave of the pandemic. This means fewer places to vote and potentially longer queues.

Elections Canada encouraged voters to wear masks, but only required them in places where they were mandated by provincial rules. Proof of vaccination regulations do not apply to polling stations in provinces where they currently exist.

Edmonton Police said they responded to a disturbance at a polling station where a man and woman refused to wear a mask inside a local public school as they attempted to vote. Police said the man was granted medical exemption and cooperated when asked to leave.

An Elections Canada spokesperson said some polls had experienced isolated delays in implementation, which created longer waits, but nothing unusual from previous years.

George Walker voted in Toronto on Monday afternoon. He called the experience “soft” and called the security measures taken at the polling station “wise”.

“But it took longer than in the past, mainly because of COVID,” Walker said, adding that he was not worried about the extra 15 minutes of waiting.

Shannon Fernandez said voting on Election Day was “super easy”, “stress free” and “very easy”.

“I felt it was very well organized,” added Fernandez. “No complaints at all.”

Polling stations are open for 12 hours, but hours of operation vary by region, starting as early as 7 a.m. PST in British Columbia and until 9:30 a.m. EDT in Ontario and most parts of Quebec.

Most of the constituency winners will be known by the end of the evening, but Elections Canada has warned that it could take up to four days to complete the counting of all special ballots, which means some races tight may not have official winners for several days.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on September 20, 2021.


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Key constituencies: races to watch on election night https://davidthompsonthings.com/key-constituencies-races-to-watch-on-election-night/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/key-constituencies-races-to-watch-on-election-night/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 12:52:37 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/key-constituencies-races-to-watch-on-election-night/ The 44th Canadian general election is upon us and most polls suggest that the race between the Liberals and the Conservatives remains too close. The tight race means there are a number of hotly contested constituencies across the country that could tip the result into Canada’s first pandemic elections. Can the Liberals still form a […]]]>

The 44th Canadian general election is upon us and most polls suggest that the race between the Liberals and the Conservatives remains too close.

The tight race means there are a number of hotly contested constituencies across the country that could tip the result into Canada’s first pandemic elections.

Can the Liberals still form a majority government? Can the Conservatives win enough seats to make Erin O’Toole the country’s 24th prime minister? Will we see another orange wave from the NDP? Will the Bloc cede ground to Quebec? Do party leaders Annamie Paul and Maxine Bernier stand a chance of winning their seats?

Here’s a look at where the games can look to make progress in each province – along with other close races to watch as the results begin to fall on Monday night.

ATLANTIC CANADA

2019 seats: Liberal 27, Conservative 4, NDP 1

There does not appear to be much reshuffle in the Maritimes and Newfoundland as election night approaches. Polls suggest the Liberals should have an easy time keeping their grip on the region, with the Conservatives able to gain ground in the form of a few seats.

Conservatives are about to return Saint-Jean-Rothesay in New Brunswick with the Liberals on track to take back the only NDP riding in Atlantic Canada – St. John’s East in Newfoundland – after the outgoing NDP MP announced his retirement.

It is shaping up to be an interesting three-way race in Fredericton with the Greens in the hope of reclaiming the capital of New Brunswick. The Greens actually took the constituency in 2019 with MP Jenica Atwin then crossing the floor to join the Liberal Party earlier this year. The fight between the Liberals and the Greens could open the door for the Conservatives to take a seat here.

There are a few races to watch in Nova Scotia where there will be close races between the Conservative and Liberal candidates – Cumberland-Colchester, Sydney-Victoria and West Nova. The Conservatives hope to win two seats from the outgoing Liberals in the two old ridings, the reverse being the case in the second.

QUEBEC

2019 seats: Liberal 35, Block 32, Conservative 10, NDP 1

The big story in Quebec on election night will be a number of hotly contested ridings between the Bloc Québécois (BQ) and the Liberals. A push by the BQ in 2019 played a big part in ensuring that Trudeau only walked away with a minority government. It will be in the best interests of Erin O’Toole and the Tories for the BQ to be more successful or, at the very least, to keep its seat total from 2019 and not give up any ground. If the Liberals manage to make any gains, it will give them a bigger cushion and give Trudeau a better chance at forming government even if they are losing ground in other parts of the country.

There are several ridings to watch to gauge the standoff between the BQ and the Liberals. Sherbrooke This is perhaps the best opportunity for the BQ to steal a seat from an outgoing Liberal MP on Monday night. While two former Liberal MPs will seek to regain their seats in Therese-De Blainville and Shefford after being defeated by the BQ candidates in 2019.

The Conservatives are not content to sit idly by in Quebec with two ridings that are shaping up to be three-way races between the BQ, the Liberals and the Conservatives. The Tories have a solid chance to claim both BQ seats with a former Tory MP seeking to regain the seat she lost in 2019 in Beauport-Limoilou and the BQ presenting a new candidate in Three Rivers after the outgoing MP announced his retirement.

Three of the party leaders present themselves in Quebec and attention will be focused on Beauce where the leader of the People’s Party of Canada (PPC), Maxime Bernier, tries to take back his former seat at the incumbent Conservative. The PPC has seen a relative increase in popular vote in the polls, although Bernier is probably the party’s only realistic move for a seat.

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau is the incumbent in the Montreal constituency of Papineau while the head of the BQ, Yves-François Blanchet, is the incumbent Beloeil-Chambly. Both are considered safe bets to keep their seats.

ONTARIO

2019 seats: Liberal 79, Conservative 36, NDP 6

Ontario is where the Conservatives are most likely to gain from Trudeau and the Liberals. While they almost certainly won’t make a dent in the Liberal stronghold of Toronto and its 25 ridings – these are the areas surrounding the city (the 905) where Erin O’Toole must make an impact. If the Conservatives can get help from the NDP in other parts of the province – and turn a number of 905 suburbs blue – that might be enough for O’Toole to win.

There are a number of ridings in the GTA that will be hotly contested between the Liberals and Conservatives, including four in York Region (Aurora-Oak Ridges-Richmond Hill, King Vaughan, Newmarket-Aurora and Richmond Hill) As well as inside Whitby. The five constituencies are projected as a draw and only Aurora-Oak Ridges-Richmond Hill is currently held by the Tories – giving way for a big swing if liberal support wanes in the GTA.

Outside the GTA, the Conservatives appear to be in a good position to claim two seats from the Liberals in Kitchener-Waterloo. In Kitchener-Conestoga, the Conservatives hope to seize the seat of the Liberal candidate they have held since 2006 before losing it in the 2019 election. Kitchener Center where a Liberal MP remains on the ballot despite allegations of sexual assault leveled against him – the Conservative candidate is the front-runner in a three-way race also involving the Greens.

Other races to watch in Ontario where Tories could fight incumbent Liberals’ seats are underway Peterborough-Kawartha and Bay of Quinte. The Hastings-Lennox and Addington The constituency is up for grabs after former Tory MP Derek Sloan was kicked out by the party last year after a number of controversies. One riding to watch in northern Ontario is Kenora the incumbent Conservative defending in a close three-way race with the Liberal and NDP candidates.

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole is the incumbent of Durham in the GTA and is considered a safe bet to be won. Besieged Greens leader Annamie Paul introduces himself Toronto Center – a seat that was held by former Finance Minister Bill Morneau – and there is a long shot left to win this constituency.


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THE PRAIRIES

2019 seats: Conservative 54, Liberal 4, NDP 4

O’Toole doesn’t appear to have the same strong support as Andrew Scheer in the Western provinces in 2019. With the recent surge of COVID-19 in Alberta and that province’s United Conservative Party – whose approach has already applauded by O’Toole – being forced to implement new restrictions and apologize for his response to the pandemic, Conservative support could slide even further on election night.

Conservative candidates face serious challenges in several urban ridings in the Prairie provinces. They will have to limit the damage, especially for the Liberal challengers in Calgary and Edmonton. Losing ground to the NDP would hurt O’Toole’s overall chances of winning less.

There are two ridings each in Edmonton and Calgary where the Liberals could fight the incumbent Conservatives. Edmonton Center, Edmonton Mill Wood, Calgary Center and Calgary Skyview – the latter being probably the Liberals’ best asset to seize a seat from the Conservatives. All four ridings were won by Liberal candidates in the 2015 election.

The NDP is also launching legitimate challenges to conservative incumbents in the Regina-Lewvan and Edmonton Griesbach ridings that appear to be very close races.

BRITISH COLUMBIA

2019 seats: Conservative 17, Liberal 11, NDP 11, Green 2

The Liberals are in a position to potentially lose a handful of seats in British Columbia to the NDP and the Conservatives. If the Conservatives can wrest four or five ridings, it could make a difference in forming the next government.

The Conservatives hope to do the most damage in Metro Vancouver where several ridings risk slipping out of Liberal hands. The races to follow are Coquitlam-Port Coquitlam, Delta, Fleetwood-Port Kells and West Vancouver-Sunshine Coast-Sea to Sky Country where the conservative candidates aim to overthrow the liberal incumbents. Polls show Coquitlam-Port Coquitlam roll like one of the safest bets to make on election night.

Former Riding of Independent MP Jody Wilson-Raybould Vancouver-Granville is a close three-way race between the Liberals, Conservatives and the NDP, and its winner could serve as a barometer for the province.

Conservatives will look to hold on with a challenge ahead Port Moody-Coquitlam of the NDP who are looking to regain a seat they had before the 2019 election. The NDP is also likely to take Burnaby North-Seymour Liberals who have held the riding since it was formed in 2015.

Greens hope to keep their two seats on Vancouver Island – amid a challenge from the Conservatives and the NDP in Nanaimo-Ladysmith. The tight three-way race is another opportunity for the Tories to come out on top on the West Coast.

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh is the incumbent in the riding of Greater Vancouver of Burnaby South and is considered a safe bet to be won.

THE NORTH

2019 seats: Liberal 2, NDP 1

There are two close races in the territories, with the Liberals fielding a new candidate in Yukon try to hold back the NDP and the NDP to present a new candidate by Nunavut delay the liberal challenge.

With files from 680 NEWS reporter Alex Bloomfield


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Alberta retailers no longer eligible for the vaccine passport program https://davidthompsonthings.com/alberta-retailers-no-longer-eligible-for-the-vaccine-passport-program/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/alberta-retailers-no-longer-eligible-for-the-vaccine-passport-program/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 21:48:51 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/alberta-retailers-no-longer-eligible-for-the-vaccine-passport-program/ Breadcrumb Links New Local News “If this had been planned well in advance, he could have either tried to come up with a fair and reasonable plan for retailers or simply made it clear from the start that they are being excluded.” Author of the article: Jason Herring Release date : Sep 19, 2021 • […]]]>

“If this had been planned well in advance, he could have either tried to come up with a fair and reasonable plan for retailers or simply made it clear from the start that they are being excluded.”

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The Alberta government made a late change to its vaccine passport program that removes retailers from the list of companies eligible to participate.

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The province made changes to the Restriction Waiver Program (REP) over the weekend. The REP goes into effect Monday and allows businesses to operate without COVID-19 restrictions as long as they check customers for proof of vaccination or a negative, privately purchased COVID-19 test performed within the previous 72 hours.

The program originally included retailers, who could participate and avoid a one-third capacity limit and a restriction that customers only buy with household members, or two close contacts if they live alone. . But retail businesses will now be required to abide by the restrictions after the provincial government changed the rules, saying “public access is necessary for everyday life.”

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John Graham is a director of the Retail Council of Canada, which represents the Prairie provinces. He said under other vaccine passport programs across Canada retail was not included as it is considered essential and involves only short interactions.

He said he spoke to a number of provincial companies preparing to participate in the REP and encountered some frustration that the final details were only made available about a day before. the start of the program. But he said it was clear the province needed to take aggressive action to tackle the fourth wave of COVID-19.

“In practice, a third of the capacity is quite manageable for most retail stores at this time of year,” Graham said.

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“Shifting retail to a third of its capacity in all areas was probably a clear message to communicate and a step towards reducing social interactions. “

The Canadian retail industry saw a drop in consumer confidence amid Wave Four, Graham added, with more people shopping online. He was hopeful that sales could rebound for the holiday season and said actions taken now could help ensure that.

The late changes to the REP are emblematic of more confusion around the program, according to Lorian Hardcastle, a health policy expert at the University of Calgary.

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“This was expected to apply to retailers, and some were caught off guard when it didn’t. But then when you start looking at retail logistics, it’s complex and that kind of complexity takes time, consultation and thought, ”said Hardcastle. These logistics include issues such as differentiating between essential and non-essential businesses and verifying proof of vaccination in large spaces such as shopping malls.

“If this had been planned well in advance, he could have either tried to come up with a fair and reasonable plan for retailers or simply made it clear from the start that they are being excluded. “

Several Calgary retailers told Postmedia on Sunday that they did not expect the new restrictions to have a significant effect on their operations.

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JoAnn McCaig of Shelf Life Books said her company continues to require the use of masks and maintains a self-imposed capacity restriction less than a third of the government’s number.

“It just hasn’t affected the way we do business,” McCaig said. “A lot of small businesses are already doing the masking and the restrictions.”

Staff are enforcing the use of the mask at Tami Neilson’s Inglewood store, which has led to disputes in recent days and weeks.

“I already had an argument with an anti-masker this morning. It’s just life. People are just ignorant, ”said Neilson, who asked Postmedia not to name his store to avoid backlash. Its store is also preparing to reduce its capacity.

“I find it frustrating but I will (apply the rules). I know some people won’t, but I want to protect myself and the kids in my store.

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“We will do our best with the restrictions in place. “

Granary Road, an outdoor recreation, dining and market space in southwest Calgary, was originally planning to participate in REP, but reconsidered its decision after the government released more details.

Company chief executive James Carmichael said he believed the outside setting would help keep customers safe.

“We were trying to figure out what’s best for the people who come to the park here, what’s best for the many different vendors here who make a living from our market and our staff,” Carmichael said.

“It wasn’t fair for companies to be put between a rock and a hard place because you’re going to upset people in one way or another.”

jherring@postmedia.com

Twitter: @jasonfherring

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Preston Manning, godfather of the Canadian right, plots a plan to deal with another Liberal government https://davidthompsonthings.com/preston-manning-godfather-of-the-canadian-right-plots-a-plan-to-deal-with-another-liberal-government/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/preston-manning-godfather-of-the-canadian-right-plots-a-plan-to-deal-with-another-liberal-government/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 05:08:21 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/preston-manning-godfather-of-the-canadian-right-plots-a-plan-to-deal-with-another-liberal-government/ Neoliberals, like Rust, never sleep. It should come as no surprise, then, that Preston Manning already seems to be looking to the new Liberal government after the election, just like the former Liberal government. Of course, no one knows for sure what will happen tomorrow. Maybe all those People’s Party of Canada trolls will get […]]]>

Neoliberals, like Rust, never sleep. It should come as no surprise, then, that Preston Manning already seems to be looking to the new Liberal government after the election, just like the former Liberal government.

Of course, no one knows for sure what will happen tomorrow. Maybe all those People’s Party of Canada trolls will get cold feet and return to the loving arms of Erin O’Toole. Maybe we will all wake up Tuesday morning to the progressive reality of Prime Minister Jagmeet Singh.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (Photo: Justin Trudeau / Flickr).

But the punditocracy is already starting to act as if Justin Trudeau and his Liberals are coming back to power, and it seems to me that Mr. Manning, the godfather of the Canadian right, is leaning in the same way as well.

At least he’s already starting to make his case for how the Conservatives should deal with another Liberal government, most likely once again backed by a large NDP contingent in Parliament, as soon as the National post and Globe and Mail finished telling us that Canadians voted for the Liberals again because they are truly conservative at heart.

According to this old brown, who invariably appears in the editorial pages of Canadian newspapers in the aftermath of a Liberal or NDP election victory, newly elected Liberal (or NDP) governments must, quite simply, immediately abandon the programs. on which they presented themselves and start delivering Strategies.

Well, now isn’t quite the time for a Preston Manning big thumbsucker in the World make this point. But in the meantime, the behind-the-scenes architect of the Wildrose and Progressive Conservative Alberta merger (how did it work, Preston?), Is already trying out his post-election arguments in front of a sympathetic audience.

Friday, C2C Review, a publication associated with the now renowned Manning Center, published a plea by the former leader of the Reform Party for Canadians to take “a more balanced approach to federal-provincial relations and national unity.” (Sea to Sea, do you understand? The online publication appears to have made its debut as a part of the Manning Center. Now that Mr. Manning has retired, his idea has become the Canada Strong & Free Network.)

It sounds pretty harmless to Canadians, but Mr. Manning has something in mind that is not necessarily very good for Canada.

First of all, he argues, we need a “balance on the environmental and economic front”. That is to say, he means, if we have to go through an environmental assessment every time someone wants to build a bitumen pipeline to the coast of British Columbia, then we should definitely have to conduct an environmental assessment. economic review whenever we want to put in place an environmental protection regime.

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole (Photo: Erin O’Toole / Flickr).

It does not matter whether governments, newspapers and bodies of cultural power have always does this and always will. Governments are concerned with economic policy. Any environmental, cultural or regulatory idea is always fully examined in light of its potential economic impact, for or against.

To suggest that governments would never do otherwise is ludicrous.

But of course, an old salesman of used ideologies who dreamed of endowing Canadian parliamentary democracy with a sclerotic institution modeled on the United States Senate, designed to curb progressive politics, no matter who voters elect, would love it. The idea of ​​formalizing an economic policy examination of any regulatory policy aimed at protecting the environment, human dignity or any other element likely to stand in the way of unbridled capitalism.

It’s not a balance, of course. It is an effort to tilt an already massively biased field in favor of capitalist economic side of the equation even further against the environment.

This, if I can be so bold, is the perfect expression of what Mr. Manning, in 2013, described as “green conservatism”.

Mr. Manning is also calling for the same kind of “balance” in health care. There have been, he writes, “hundreds of thousands of cases where jobs, income and businesses have been killed by the health protection measures adopted, without any official attempt to measure or report these economic impacts. so that a balance can be found between the protection of health and the protection of the economy.

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh (Photo: David J. Climenhaga).

It sounds like a reference to the response to COVID-19 in places outside of Mr. Manning’s native Alberta. Given the success of the approach here in Alberta of what he seems to be advocating, he may want to tone that down for a few months.

He also claims that there are a similar number of cases where the charter the rights of Canadians “have been violated by health protection measures”. Despite anti-vaccine hysteria, fueled by intentions Qonfusion south of the medicine line, this is just nonsense.

As Mr. Manning soon reveals, his argument is really just a sneaky justification for the same old argument of “freedom” for two-tier American-style health care. It makes the false promise that we can enjoy all the benefits of a “mixed” health system, which provides universal (minimal) care through more privatization, union busting and co-payment.

He goes on to call for more balance in federal-provincial relations – which strangely resembles a code allowing Conservative provinces to dismantle national approaches to health care and other programs under provincial or joint jurisdiction. Ditto, he wants a balance for the regions – presumably a plea to treat the workhorses of oil development in the Prairie provinces of Canada with as much gravity as Quebec’s existential concerns about its language and culture.

If that last point seems to echo Alberta Premier Jason Kenney’s nonsense about how Alberta is sort of a distinct society, there is probably a good reason for it. Arguably, Mr. Kenney owes his work to Mr. Manning’s machinations. (And if he doesn’t keep it longer, the call telling him the gig is over will likely come from Mr. Manning as well.)

Finally, Mr. Manning concludes with a call for the “politics of unity” to replace the “politics of identity” – which he defines as qualities such as “ethnicity, gender, age. or sexual orientation ”.

This one is taken straight from the Trump Republican textbook. A call for fairness by any group of humans who are not white males of European descent, fully engaged in fundamentalist market capitalism, is termed “identity politics”. The interests of what was once precisely called the ruling class is the one principle around which we must all rally.

In truth, there is no better practitioner of identity politics than the conservative right, to better activate its lumpen voting base and eliminate all arguments for a better world like innuendo of fanaticism and impracticality.

“The replacement of identity politics with unitary politics is a prerequisite for achieving national consensus on the key issues necessary to facilitate the implementation of one of the main political positions advanced by federal leaders and parties in their speeches and election platforms, ”Manning exclaims. to an end.

He concludes: “A key question to be answered when analyzing which federal leader, party and candidate to support in the next federal election is, which offers the most balanced approach..

In other words, vote for the guy most likely to put capital rights first.

NOTE: Give C2C Journal its due. He is sincere about his propertydefense of rights. It’s not the only rightwing organization that used one of the author’s photographs without permission, but it was the only one that paid when sending an invoice.


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Singh seeks to overturn Tory-held seats in COVID-19-hit prairies https://davidthompsonthings.com/singh-seeks-to-overturn-tory-held-seats-in-covid-19-hit-prairies/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/singh-seeks-to-overturn-tory-held-seats-in-covid-19-hit-prairies/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 19:43:14 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/singh-seeks-to-overturn-tory-held-seats-in-covid-19-hit-prairies/ Jagmeet Singh criticized the responses to the COVID-19 pandemic from the provincial governments of Saskatchewan and Alberta as the NDP’s federal campaign focused on the seats held by the Conservatives in the Prairie provinces. Singh says people on the Prairies are hit hard by the fourth wave of the pandemic because their governments let them […]]]>

Jagmeet Singh criticized the responses to the COVID-19 pandemic from the provincial governments of Saskatchewan and Alberta as the NDP’s federal campaign focused on the seats held by the Conservatives in the Prairie provinces.

Singh says people on the Prairies are hit hard by the fourth wave of the pandemic because their governments let them down.

“People should be mad at conservative prime ministers,” Singh said on Saturday. “They did a terrible job and it put people’s lives in danger.”

Read more:
Singh defends NDP climate plan, says liberal policy is not good enough

Singh is aiming to snatch the prairie seats from the federal Tories, but also took aim at Justin Trudeau during a stop in Saskatoon, saying the Liberal leader abandoned the provinces in Wave Four.

Trudeau is to blame for calling an election and failing to find solutions to the pandemic such as paid sick leave for workers, he said.

“Sir. Trudeau chose a selfish election.

Singh has remained focused on the Liberals throughout the campaign, saying the New Democrats are a viable alternative and discouraging people from voting strategically. Despite running a campaign that outwardly prides itself on positivity, the New Democrats have been very negative towards Trudeau.

Singh said Canadians must make a choice, which means pointing out the mistakes and bad decisions of other leaders.

The popularity level of the New Democrats has not changed much in the last week of the campaign, as the party lags behind the Liberals and Conservatives in the opinion polls.

Read more:
2021 Canadian Elections: Here’s Your Last Minute Voter’s Guide

Singh did not respond to repeated questions about whether he would support the Liberals if Monday’s election resulted in a minority government led by Trudeau. He also wouldn’t say if he thinks the party that wins the most seats should get first access to government.

The NDP says Singh is ready to increase the party’s number of seats to fight in the House of Commons for what Canadians need.

He planned to visit the ridings of Regina and Edmonton before leading his campaign in British Columbia.

© 2021 The Canadian Press


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It was a very Canadian agricultural debate https://davidthompsonthings.com/it-was-a-very-canadian-agricultural-debate/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/it-was-a-very-canadian-agricultural-debate/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 16:24:36 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/it-was-a-very-canadian-agricultural-debate/ Canada’s agricultural political leaders seem to get along very well, at least on public outings. Last week’s agricultural debate, held online, was no exception. They got along so well that it was difficult to tell them apart. Other than a few political photos of the Liberal Agriculture Minister, taken by Conservative Ontario farm critic Dave […]]]>

Canada’s agricultural political leaders seem to get along very well, at least on public outings. Last week’s agricultural debate, held online, was no exception. They got along so well that it was difficult to tell them apart.

Other than a few political photos of the Liberal Agriculture Minister, taken by Conservative Ontario farm critic Dave Epp, there hasn’t been much back-and-forth to the debate sponsored by the Canadian Federation of Agriculture. Agriculture. The four participants agreed on most of the topics and questions posed by the moderators.

If farmers wanted their vote to be influenced in some way by this debate, they probably didn’t find anything convincing. Statistics on website users indicate that approximately 1,800 people watched or logged into the article online, including those who saw it live on September 9.

All debaters were well informed and the quality of the discussion was high. With the exception of the Liberal Marie-Claude Bibeau, the others sit on the parliamentary committee on agriculture: Epp, Alistair MacGregor from the NDP and Yves Perron from the Bloc Québécois. All of them know their way around agricultural problems.

Some western farmers who watched the event said they appreciated Perron’s positions and his suggestions that business risk management programs should be expanded and made more financially competitive with US programs.

Representatives of all participating parties said BRM programs need the ongoing overhaul, although they differ slightly on what is needed. Bibeau pointed to the recent injection of $ 95 million into these tools and the commitment of $ 400 million to improve AgriRecovery funding, which will be provided if the Prairie provinces play along. She said the Conservatives cut hundreds of millions of dollars from these programs when they were in power.

Epp, from southwestern Ontario, said the Conservatives will cut red tape for producers and industry and get better guidance from the agriculture industry on improvements to ERMs. He didn’t provide any details and that’s where the devil usually lies.

He suggested that the same would apply with regard to research. The Conservatives would reduce the regulation of genetics companies and create more partnerships with industrial players in agriculture.

Bibeau said the Liberal government has invested to replace the $ 400 million in research cuts made by the Harper administration. This included reopening the research facilities, adding 70 more scientists, and creating the Protein Super Cluster and its partnerships.

MacGregor said the NDP would put more scientists back on the ground and provide long-term predictable funding for agriculture. Perron has lashed out at Health Canada and its PMRA, canceling pesticide registrations without approving or helping develop replacement tools for farmers.

Each side wants more investment in roads, bridges, rural internet and cellular connectivity. Perron and Bibeau agreed that a recent federal-provincial effort and investment in expanding Internet coverage and bandwidth has shown positive signs.

Debaters have all come out in favor of changing the tax regulations for intergenerational transfer of farmland, proposed during this session in Bill 208, which has now become law.

The Liberals want more changes to the law, but even on a point that the four debaters disagreed with, they actually agreed.

The Canadian Federation of Agriculture deserves praise for hosting this debate, which gave these candidates the opportunity to discuss the issues and potentially differentiate their party’s platforms from others.

In the end, it was a very Canadian type of gathering, very agricultural, polite and pleasant.

Karen Brière, Bruce Dyck, Barb Glen and Mike Raine collaborate on editorials for Western Producer.


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The Governance Monitor: Immigration and Systemic Racism https://davidthompsonthings.com/the-governance-monitor-immigration-and-systemic-racism/ https://davidthompsonthings.com/the-governance-monitor-immigration-and-systemic-racism/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/the-governance-monitor-immigration-and-systemic-racism/ The Peace Tower on Parliament Hill in Ottawa (Jolson Lim / iPolitics) The Governance Monitor tracks the impact of the election campaign on Canadians’ confidence in government. The Governance Monitor measures social media engagement (activity) and sentiment (negative / positive) across an ideological spectrum of the Canadian population – far left (five percent), left (30 […]]]>

The Governance Monitor tracks the impact of the election campaign on Canadians’ confidence in government.

The Governance Monitor measures social media engagement (activity) and sentiment (negative / positive) across an ideological spectrum of the Canadian population – far left (five percent), left (30 percent), center ( 30 percent), right (30 percent) and far right (five percent) – against the OECD’s strong predictors of public confidence.

Data trends

  • After a steady decline in confidence in the government since last weekend, the Daily Trust Tracker posted a positive three-point rebound, to 55% on September 14.
  • Along the ideological spectrum, there are high levels of engagement on the far left and left regarding trust in government in British Columbia, the Atlantic region and Ontario. The right is more present in the Prairie provinces, Ontario and Quebec. The far right is most prominent in the Prairie provinces, and its highest concentration is in Alberta.
  • Immigration and Confidence in Government: the center and right cohorts feel positive about the government’s ability to deal with immigration issues. The left has a negative feeling of confidence and the far right has an extremely negative feeling on this issue.
  • Systemic racism and trust in government: all ideological cohorts have a negative sense of confidence in the capacity of public institutions to improve systemic racism; stronger negative sentiment is present at both ends of the spectrum.What this meansThere are significant differences in why ideological cohorts trust – or don’t trust – government on important issues surrounding immigration and systemic racism.On immigration issues, negative sentiment on the left and far left is based on the belief that the government is not doing enough to support new Canadians. The far right, on the other hand, is negative about immigration and government because it believes new Canadians receive preferential treatment.On the issue of systemic racism, although there is negative sentiment across the ideological spectrum, it exists for different reasons. Center, left and far left believe the government is not doing enough to tackle systemic racism. The right tends to be on the defensive of Canadian institutions like the RCMP. The far right sees government assistance to marginalized Canadians as racist in itself.Generally speaking, the commitment and sentiments of all ideological cohorts reflect different views on the role government should play on issues of justice and equity in Canadian society, a topic that has been discussed. raised in the debate of English-speaking leaders.

    Why is this important

    In an increasingly polarized world, governments are tempted to develop “corner solutions” that play with the feelings of one ideological cohort while ignoring those of another. This strategy may work in the short term – by mobilizing a particular ideological cohort or a specific region of the country, for example – but in the long term it will undermine trust in public institutions and democracy itself.

    To work for consensus on issues of immigration and systemic racism and to build trust in government, a new government will need to address not only the different views of ideological cohorts on the government’s ability to deal with them, but also the specific reasons for their point of view.

    On the issue of immigration, in response to mixed feelings about trust, the government could lead a national discussion on the importance of immigration to Canada’s future and the inclusion of new Canadians in society. Confidence will increase on the left if the government is seen to be helping new Canadians adapt and be a part of their new country, and on the right if new Canadians are seen to be treated equally.

    Strongly polarized views regarding the government’s ability to tackle systemic racism also pose a challenge for a new government. Again, a national dialogue aimed at increasing understanding of the impact of systemic racism on the effectiveness of our public institutions, such as the RCMP, could be used to develop a common strategy moving forward.

    It should be noted that such actions on these two issues would demonstrate that the new government is both open and responsive – two of the key elements of confidence in the OECD government.

    PROJECT OVERVIEW

    The governance monitor looks beyond the electoral horse race to generate insightful ideas and expert analysis on how # Elxn44 affects the faith and confidence of Canadians in our government and its institutions.

    For more information: Brad Graham, Vice-President of the Institute of Governance, [email protected]

    © Institute of Governance & Advanced Symbolics Inc. September 2021


    This is the fifth in a series of articles produced jointly by the Institute on Governance and Advanced Symbolics for TVO.org and iPolitics. Throughout the federal election campaign, these articles will analyze the extent to which Canadians trust government and what that confidence could mean for the future of our country.

    The views, opinions and positions expressed by all columnists and contributors to iPolitics are the sole responsibility of the author. They do not inherently or expressly reflect the views, opinions and / or positions of iPolitics.

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