The Prairie Provinces – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 02:26:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://davidthompsonthings.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png The Prairie Provinces – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ 32 32 Schoolchildren in Mississauga and Brampton may not get their rapid tests right away https://davidthompsonthings.com/schoolchildren-in-mississauga-and-brampton-may-not-get-their-rapid-tests-right-away/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 02:26:15 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/schoolchildren-in-mississauga-and-brampton-may-not-get-their-rapid-tests-right-away/ By Nathan Sager Published on January 14, 2022 at 9:06 p.m. Not all school children in Mississauga and Brampton will receive rapid antigen tests on their first day back to school, according to plans released by the two councils. The wording of the test distribution differs slightly between the Peel District School Board (PDSB) and […]]]>

By Nathan Sager

Published on January 14, 2022 at 9:06 p.m.

Not all school children in Mississauga and Brampton will receive rapid antigen tests on their first day back to school, according to plans released by the two councils.

The wording of the test distribution differs slightly between the Peel District School Board (PDSB) and the Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board (PDCDSB), according to information aggregated by PeelCOVIDWatch. Every pupil is supposed to have two rapid antigen tests (RATs) sent home, as promised by Education Minister Stephen Lecce and Chief Medical Officer Dr Kieran Moore.

Peel Public Council said it had “taken steps to ensure kits will be available for in-person staff and in-person students who may become symptomatic at school when we resume in-person learning Monday, January 17. The school board has enough supplies to administer two tests to all staff in person and to elementary students in person.

However, an update to the board says the test kit supplies “have arrived in bulk” and the “dekitting” process is taking time. The provincial supplier ships the kits in boxes of five. On Friday, several education officials shared staff positions re-sorting the tests. Perhaps, therefore, secondary school students will be offered tests to take away a little later.

Also, as of Friday, not all schools had received three-ply masks.

On the positive side for high school students, exams do not take place. Final grades will be based on a teacher’s assessment.

The Dufferin-Peel Catholic Board offers assurances that they will be able to provide two tests for each student. Primary students will get their first, with secondary students to be supplied later in the week.

“These tests should only be used in the event that the child has symptoms of COVID.”

The directive from the Ontario Ministry of Education (MOE), which decided this week that in-person learning will resume on Monday, calls for notifying affected members of a school community only when the whole school has a 30% absentee rate. Reporting of COVID-19 will no longer continue in schools. Some boards in Ontario have chosen to continue or inform parents when the absentee rate reaches a threshold well below 30%.

The Dufferin-Peel Catholic Board, however, plans to update absence rates daily on its website.

Peel Public Council says it will notify affected students and staff when it becomes aware of a PCR or RAT confirmed case of COVID-19. However, its plans do not appear to go beyond the MOE’s 30% public disclosure threshold.

It’s also unclear whether attendance rates, or absenteeism, will be based on who is in a school building. Some school boards may count as attendance students who log on to a virtual learning platform, since attendance is factored into Ontario’s education funding formula.

Remote learning remains a possibility

The DPCDSB also warns that a child’s classroom format could be changed on the fly based on operational needs. This could include combining classes for one day due to security or supervision issues. There is also the “option to switch to asynchronous learning for students who are in full-time distance learning”.

These are meant to be last resort options, the council said.

Comparison with Alberta?

Ahead of Ontario, Alberta resumed in-person learning this week with promises of better masks and rapid antigen testing along the way.

While there are differences in provincial populations and return-to-school planning, Alberta’s experience with resuming in-person learning could offer rough insight for Ontario and the region. of Peel.

Between Edmonton and Calgary, approximately 3,000 teachers and various education workers are being sidelined.

Edmonton’s two school divisions had about 1,580 staff absent Friday. About 64% of them were teachers, and not all absences were covered. More than 3% of the city’s public board students were absent due to COVID-19, and 3.5% were absent for other reasons, the Edmonton Journal reported.

As of Thursday, the Calgary Board of Education had 1,330 absent employees, including 815 teachers, and could not cover all absences. The city’s Catholic school district also said 129 staff members were furloughed.

Like Ontario, the Alberta government has also stopped reporting COVID-19 infections and absences.

However, the Prairie province has not reimposed some of the public health restrictions that Ontario enacted last week when it moved to a “modified Stage 2.” Indoor restaurants remain open, as do some closed businesses in Ontario until at least January 26.

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Rising number of cases prompts US to issue travel advisory for Canada https://davidthompsonthings.com/rising-number-of-cases-prompts-us-to-issue-travel-advisory-for-canada/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 15:57:12 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/rising-number-of-cases-prompts-us-to-issue-travel-advisory-for-canada/ Justin Trudeau says Ottawa will do everything possible to help provinces and territories deal with the fifth wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, as infections fueled by the Omicron variant threaten to overwhelm healthcare systems. The Prime Minister spoke to provincial and territorial leaders yesterday, and a statement released by his office said he assured them […]]]>

Justin Trudeau says Ottawa will do everything possible to help provinces and territories deal with the fifth wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, as infections fueled by the Omicron variant threaten to overwhelm healthcare systems.

The Prime Minister spoke to provincial and territorial leaders yesterday, and a statement released by his office said he assured them there were enough doses of the vaccine available for all eligible Canadians to receive a third injection reminder.

The federal government said provinces and territories will receive a total of 140 million rapid tests this month, although the release did not provide any new details on the date of deliveries.

The statement said Trudeau also stressed the need to promote supportive programs, such as the federal wage subsidy, to help people and businesses survive the latest public health closures and restrictions.

The call with the premiers came as the number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations continue to rise across Canada.

Quebec reported an all-time high of 2,554 patients, including 248 in intensive care, while Ontario confirmed 2,467 hospitalizations and 438 intensive care patients.

The provinces also recorded a combined total of 20,279 new COVID cases, although the actual number is likely much higher due to a lack of access to testing.

The rampant spread of the Omicron variant has fueled alarms south of the border, where the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a new level 4 “avoid travel” advisory for Canada, citing a level “Very high” of COVID-19 in the countryside. He urged everyone who has to go to be fully immunized.

This promptly prompted the State Department to revise its travel advisory, which was at Level 3, “reconsider travel,” to move its advisory to Level 4: “Do not travel to Canada due to COVID-19. “

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on January 11, 2022.

The Canadian Press

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JONES: Kevin Koe and Laura Walker win provincial curling championships https://davidthompsonthings.com/jones-kevin-koe-and-laura-walker-win-provincial-curling-championships/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 02:29:53 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/jones-kevin-koe-and-laura-walker-win-provincial-curling-championships/ Breadcrumb Links Curling Had representatives been selected from the council chamber like everyone else forced to do last year, Walker and Koe undoubtedly would have been back dressed in blue with the provincial coat of arms on the back. Author of the article: Terry jones Release date : Jan 09, 2022 • 30 minutes ago […]]]>

Had representatives been selected from the council chamber like everyone else forced to do last year, Walker and Koe undoubtedly would have been back dressed in blue with the provincial coat of arms on the back.

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Kevin Koe and Laura Walker probably would have been there anyway.

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If Alberta had canceled the provincial championships like so many other provinces due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it would have been almost automatic.

Had representatives been selected from the council chamber like everyone forced to do last year, Walker and Koe undoubtedly would have been back dressed in blue with the provincial coat of arms on their backs.

But Koe made his way to his 10th Brier and Walker to his third straight Scotties and that way was much more satisfying. And it was an event. It was Alberta’s first combination of championships in Grande Prairie.

It was Walker who spoke to him best at the end of the day.

“There is nothing like winning. We are so proud of what Curling Alberta and Grande Prairie have achieved this week to keep us playing safe. We are so proud, ”she said.

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Walker, who was unusually emotional when she won her first Alberta Scotties two years ago at Okotoks, nearly matched that after Sunday’s 6-5 final win over Lethbridge’s Casey Scheidegger because of all that was involved.

“We were so lucky to be able to play this week when so many people in our country are kept away from what they love to do. Once again, we want to warmly congratulate Curling Alberta for giving us a chance to compete. We feel so grateful.

“It’s just the world for us to go back and wear the Alberta colors again. We love to represent this province, ”she said of Kate Cameron, Taylor McDonald and Nadine Scotland who combined eight perfect shots in the last end.

“Every trip to the Scotties is so special. We are so delighted to be going back. We feel like we’re getting into a good rhythm as a team and if we keep playing like that we’ll be in the mix.

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For Koe, it was a potential first step towards making the story.

Randy Ferbey, Kevin Martin and Koe, along with Saskatchewan’s Ernie Richardson all won four Briers.

It was somewhat surprising that Koe found himself facing Edmonton’s Ted Appelman in the final.

Koe had been in Grande Prairie since the previous Sunday and had only had to play four games, all broken up, to advance to the final. Appelman had to play nine in the men’s triple KO format.

But Koe hadn’t rusted.

Appelman caused problems for Koe in the first end, but the Yellowknife native, who won his first Brier and world titles in Edmonton before being transferred to Calgary by his oil employers, was the hit of the week.

It was a brilliant double raise to score two with his last rock in the first end which he turned into a 6-2 lead in the fifth break with Koe curling 99%.

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He finished 8-4 for Koe, BJ Nuefeld, John Morris and Ben Hebert.

“We came here to go to the Brier wearing an Alberta jersey again,” Koe said after winning his seventh Alberta title.

He had played most of his recent Briers wearing the Team Canada uniform.

“We were controlling every game all week and this game took it to another level,” said the captain, who said, “one of our best games of the year”.

Appelman didn’t think about making his third final in the past six years when he showed up to Grande Prairie with a pair of COVID positives and a last-minute addition to his Edmonton squad. But with a team from Nathan Connolly, Kevin Tym, Eric Richard and Aaron Slushinski came out of the grass to finish in the final this time.

“Two of our players tested positive at Christmas, which means they couldn’t play here on day one. So we asked Aaron to join the team and off we went.

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“We curled with just three in the first game, Nathan and Kevin then got out of quarantine and joined us and they’ve been in and out of the roster all week. “

Appelman lost his previous finals to Brendan Bottcher and Koe, but the latter turned into one of the great curling experiences of his life.

“We faced Koe in the final at Ellerslie in 2019 and they ended up asking me to join fifth man in the Brier and we ended up winning the Brier and a silver medal at the world championships,” said Appelman.

Chances are he will be asked to come back.

Team Scheidegger returns home at the end of an Olympic quadrennial after winning the Alberta title in 2018 and deciding now is the time to start a family.

“We have had three babies in the last three years, Cary-Anne, Jessie and myself,” she said at the end after coming back from a two-game Alberta Scotties in 2020 eight weeks after having gave the diaper to his son Ryker.

“Losing a provincial final really sucks. We were really happy with our week but we come home wishing we could do a few more shots together. We put ourselves in a great position and just couldn’t finish at the end. “

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Wave of events across Saskatchewan. being canceled, postponed due to Omicron https://davidthompsonthings.com/wave-of-events-across-saskatchewan-being-canceled-postponed-due-to-omicron/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/wave-of-events-across-saskatchewan-being-canceled-postponed-due-to-omicron/ Events across Saskatchewan are canceled and postponed due to the increase in the number of cases of the Omicron variant. Large gatherings are not limited to Saskatchewan like they are to other provinces, so decisions are up to the organizers. The Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra has canceled its Disney Frozen in Concert show, scheduled for January […]]]>

Events across Saskatchewan are canceled and postponed due to the increase in the number of cases of the Omicron variant.

Large gatherings are not limited to Saskatchewan like they are to other provinces, so decisions are up to the organizers.

The Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra has canceled its Disney Frozen in Concert show, scheduled for January 29. Refunds will be issued to all ticket holders.

Nutrien Wonderhub, Saskatoon’s children’s museum, has closed due to understaffing.

The Saskatoon Library had hoped to have extended hours in the New Year, but that plan is scrapped.

This year’s Luther Invitational Tournament (LIT), the long-running annual basketball tournament that was slated to start the first week of February at Luther College in Regina, is now canceled due to COVID-19.

On Wednesday, organizers of the Bedford Road Invitational Tournament in Saskatoon announced a similar cancellation of their event due to COVID-19.

On Thursday, Huskie Athletics announced the cancellation of the Sanderson Classic indoor track and field event on January 14 and 15, hosted by the University of Saskatchewan.

Canceled Winter Games

The Saskatchewan Winter Games, which were scheduled to take place in February in Regina, were canceled late Friday afternoon. The event was expected to host approximately 1,500 young athletes competing in a multitude of sports.

Valerie Sleuth, chair of the organizing committee, said the cancellation was based on advice from medical advisers concerned about the unpredictability of the Omicron variant.

“We met our host organizing committee and I can tell you there were tears in the room,” Sleuth said. “And those tears weren’t for the people involved. It was because of the impact it has on the athletes who ultimately won’t be able to compete in this event.”

“The Saskatchewan Games are a pivotal event for early career athletes,” said Sleuth. “It sets the stage for them to participate in games in the future. So we were all keen to provide this opportunity to these young athletes, and we are saddened today.”

Sleuth says that with the continued support of volunteers and the business community, the games could take place next February.

Winterruption postponed

Upcoming Winterruption festivals in western Canada – including Regina, Saskatoon, and Swift Current – are postponed until at least March.

“We were starting to investigate what to do with Omicron. And then as soon as public health restrictions fell in our neighboring Prairie provinces, it became clear that these Winterruption festivals in Edmonton, Winnipeg, etc., n ‘weren’t going to be able to move forward as planned,’ said Amber Goodwyn, artistic director of the Regina Folk Festival, which hosts Winterruption in the Queen City.

The next Winterruption festivals in Western Canada are postponed until at least March. (The Broadway Theater)

Goodwyn said festivals are not going to be able to sell enough tickets.

“When we bring artists to the Prairies, especially in the middle of winter, it has to be profitable for them as well. They need a tour. They can’t just fly to a one-time show in Regina. They need it to cross the Prairie provinces.

Goodwyn said this is one of the reasons the Winterruption Festivals were created in the first place.

Amber Goodwyn is artistic director of the Regina Folk Festival, which presents Winterruption in the Queen City. She says Winterruption is being postponed until early spring. (Laura Sciarpeletti / CBC)

Decision fatigue

The Moose Jaw-based Saskatchewan Festival of Words is a four-day summer literary festival that also hosts events throughout the year. He postponed his January 15 and 22 special concerts at the Mae Wilson Theater due to Omicron.

“We noticed with the rapid ramp-up of Omicron that tickets started not selling around the beginning of January, and we just felt that people weren’t comfortable attending the. shows right now due to the increase in cases, ”said Amanda Farnel, operations coordinator. for the party.

“We can’t guarantee the safety of our crowds in the theater as much as we would like to say as we can. And so we thought it was best for everyone.”

Farnel said performers Dayna Manning and Clerel also didn’t feel comfortable traveling to Moose Jaw for the concerts with so many Omicron registers across the country.

The Saskatchewan Festival of Words has postponed its January 15-22 special concerts at the Mae Wilson Theater due to Omicron. (Saskatchewan Festival of Words)

Farnel said canceling and postponing events has become extremely time-consuming, disappointing and difficult for the artists, who have put a lot of work into the planning.

“What we’ve been talking about a lot lately is decision fatigue. Where you basically make what looks like life and death decisions almost on a daily basis, when it comes to the safety of people. And that makes it really tough. “said Farnel. .

“I think people don’t do the amount of work it takes to plan events, move events and have to be flexible all the time. There are a lot of moving parts and a lot of things that need to be coordinated to put it all together and put it all together. having to do it several times for the same show … it’s very difficult and very exhausting. “

Saskatchewan is the only province in the country without collection limits during this fifth wave of the pandemic. Farnel and Goodwyn said the province’s advice can be of great help at times like these.

“I still think strong leadership and proactive approaches to issues are a good idea. What happens when temporary restrictions are not put in place is that it offloads the problem onto other organizations and businesses and event planners who will do so in different ways. kinds of ways, not standardized, ”Goodwyn said.


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Getting ready for the Western Canadian Crop Production Show https://davidthompsonthings.com/getting-ready-for-the-western-canadian-crop-production-show/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 00:12:31 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/getting-ready-for-the-western-canadian-crop-production-show/ COVID was unable to put the brakes on the Western Canadian Crop Production Show for a second year. Planning began six months ago and the four-day event will begin on Monday, January 10. The first exhibitors began to move into the various halls of Saskatoon Prairieland Park on Wednesday afternoon. It will take three days […]]]>

COVID was unable to put the brakes on the Western Canadian Crop Production Show for a second year.

Planning began six months ago and the four-day event will begin on Monday, January 10. The first exhibitors began to move into the various halls of Saskatoon Prairieland Park on Wednesday afternoon. It will take three days for the 350 exhibitors in the Prairie provinces to set up their displays and move their equipment inside.

“Our exhibitors are delighted to be back,” said Lori Cates, Director of Agriculture at Saskatoon Prairieland Park. “Exhibitors tell us they need to get back to their customers. They want that face to face contact. This show has always been about doing business. I think it will be the same this year and that is what we are prepared for.

The Western Canadian Crop Production Show will operate under all current provincial COVID-19 guidelines, including masks, proof of vaccination, or an approved negative COVID test performed within 48 hours of participation.

CropSphere and the various annual general meetings of crop organizations will be held in conjunction with the Western Canadian Crop Production Show. Additionally, the Saskatchewan Agriculture Hall of Fame will announce its 2021 inductees on Tuesday afternoon.

You can hear Lori Cates’ full interview below:

Cates talks about the NuFarm Information Theater and the various COVID public health guidelines.


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JONES: Boston Pizza Cup and Sentinel Storage Scotties in Grande Prairie https://davidthompsonthings.com/jones-boston-pizza-cup-and-sentinel-storage-scotties-in-grande-prairie/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 19:15:29 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/jones-boston-pizza-cup-and-sentinel-storage-scotties-in-grande-prairie/ Breadcrumb Links Curling On Monday in Grande Prairie, Curling Alberta chose to launch the very first combined men’s and women’s provincial Scotties of the Boston Pizza Cup and Sentinel Storage. Author of the article: Terry jones Team Walker skips Laura Walker in the women’s quarterfinals of the Curling Grand Slam at the Chestermere Rec Center […]]]>

On Monday in Grande Prairie, Curling Alberta chose to launch the very first combined men’s and women’s provincial Scotties of the Boston Pizza Cup and Sentinel Storage.

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It’s a BYOB event.

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Build your own bubble.

If curlers paid any attention to the IIHF World Juniors and the Red Deer Bubble in particular, they know how fragile it has become to keep an entire team, whether it’s four or 25 players, on ice, even if the ice happens to be pebbles.

In the past two weeks, Curling Canada canceled the Olympic mixed doubles qualifier at Portage LaPrairie and Slam eliminated the final competition before Beijing at Camrose.

Four provinces have chosen to select teams instead of organizing provincials.

So, you may be somewhat surprised to learn that at 9 a.m. on Monday in Grande Prairie, Curling Alberta chose to launch the very first combined of the Men’s Boston Pizza Cup and Women’s Provincial Scotties Sentinel Storage.

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Will they be able to bring eight women’s and 12 men’s teams to the finish line for the two semi-finals on Saturday and the two finals on Sunday broadcast nationally by Sportsnet?

They lost a team on Sunday when Jamie King of Edmonton had three of his team tested positive. And Ted Appelman came to Grande Prairie with two players in quarantine and added one on his way to join his up to three-member squad for the opener on Monday against… well… King.

Appelman won by forfeit.

It’s going to be an interesting week, especially for Laura Walker of Edmonton, wife of Geoff Walker of Beijing of Brad Gushue’s Canadian Olympic team, regarding the growing numbers of the latest COVID-19 Omicron variant.

Walker and his team of Kate Cameron, Taylor McDonald and Nadine Scotland traveled to Grande Prairie determined to compete if Alberta Curling General Manager Jill Richards and the host committee could succeed.

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Walker’s team that finished out of the playoffs 3-5 at the Olympic trials in Saskatoon decided if Grande Prairie was going to have the courage and ingenuity to go against the grain and try, their team was really sure she was going to show up.

“After so many challenges we’ve found a way to stay the course and I believe crossing the finish line of this event is now within our grasp,” said Richard.

“We have the incredible privilege of appointing representatives to the Brier and the Scotties and that should really be decided by the curlers on the ice.”

For Walker, that was all she needed to hear.

“With things changing on a daily basis and being at the mercy of the province’s restrictions, we couldn’t be 100 percent sure he could cross the finish line,” Walker said.

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“It’s really worrying. It is hard to believe that in the current landscape of our province, no one will come forward with the virus. “

So they tried to build their own bubble.

“We don’t go to a restaurant to eat at all. We will not see family and friends. We are staying in an Airbnb instead of a hotel and we were all extremely cautious in the days leading up to the event.

The Walkers have a 15-month-old boy, Liam, who they were planning to take to Grande Prairie for the week, but Geoff decided to spend the week with him at home.

“Geoff had planned to go but now with the risks of COVID being so contagious, he has decided to stay home with Liam and keep his contact outside the house as minimal as possible,” he said. she declared.

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And Laura is getting ready to watch Canada’s games from the Ice Cube in Beijing at unusual times.

“No international visitors,” she said.

Walker says missing the chance to represent Canada at the Olympics doesn’t devalue this year’s provincial championships.

“Even bigger. Our eyes were on the Olympics and not doing it was hugely disappointing. But it just made us hungrier than ever to go back to the Scotties. “

Kelsey Rocque of Edmonton, also 3-5 at the Olympic Trials, says it’s exactly the same with her team of Danielle Schmiemann, Dana Ferguson and Rachelle Brown.

“Based on the fact that we have grown accustomed to events canceled due to restrictions or for public health safety over the past two years, our team was prepared for either situation to arise. produce.

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“I’m sure there will be situations where players from some teams won’t be able to continue throughout the event, especially given how quickly this new variant seems to be spreading. All we can do is trust that we are all following all distancing, masking and isolating protocols if any of us are showing symptoms.

“We have limited our contacts during the Christmas holidays to try to make sure that we are less likely to get sick,” Rocque said.

“Other than that, we will be following all of the protocols established by Curling Alberta when it comes to masking, distancing, getting enough rest and doing what we can to stay healthy throughout the week.

“From our perspective, winning Alberta is a big deal every year. I don’t think there is less importance about this event this year than if it was played at any other time. As tough a week as the trials have been you have to focus on getting the Scotties which would be a dream come true.

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The Weather Network – A year in reverse saw more tornadoes in Ontario than in Oklahoma https://davidthompsonthings.com/the-weather-network-a-year-in-reverse-saw-more-tornadoes-in-ontario-than-in-oklahoma/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 15:37:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/the-weather-network-a-year-in-reverse-saw-more-tornadoes-in-ontario-than-in-oklahoma/ Saturday, January 1, 2022, 1:35 p.m. – Unusual weather conditions across North America have caused a loop in Canada and the United States in 2021, producing more tornadoes in Ontario than in all the Prairie provinces combined. A wild year of extreme weather conditions was not destined to have a mundane tornado season. 2021 has […]]]>

Saturday, January 1, 2022, 1:35 p.m. – Unusual weather conditions across North America have caused a loop in Canada and the United States in 2021, producing more tornadoes in Ontario than in all the Prairie provinces combined.

A wild year of extreme weather conditions was not destined to have a mundane tornado season. 2021 has been a strange year for tornadoes across North America. Ontario faced a barrage of tornadoes that largely spared the heart of the tornado alley. Rare tornadoes have hit Nova Scotia and British Columbia. The pattern also kept things weird in the United States, where we witnessed similar tornadoes in Kansas just a short drive from New York City.

ONTARIO HAS SEEN MORE TORNADOES THAN OKLAHOMA

Ontario registering more tornadoes than Oklahoma is a statistic that hardly seems to be true, but it is! Western University’s Northern Tornadoes Project (NTP) confirmed 46 tornadoes across Ontario in 2021, which is significantly higher than the provincial average of about a dozen tornadoes in a typical year.

Meanwhile, Oklahoma recorded just 39 tornado reports between Jan.1 and Dec.31. The Southern Plains State is typically a hotbed of spring tornado activity, but Oklahoma reported only one tornado in March and April.

tornadoes in canada 2021

The pattern responsible for this upside down tornado season is the same one that brought unfathomable heat to western Canada this summer. A steep ridge of high pressure stationed on the west coast for most of the season diverted much of the storm’s activity eastward, keeping the storm tracks focused over Ontario, Quebec and eastern United States.

WATCH: 2021 in Canada: West Coast incurs Mother Nature’s wrath

Last summer’s wildfires in British Columbia also played a role in suppressing tornado activity on the Prairies. The prolific smoke from forest fires blowing east across the country during the summer months served to quell thunderstorm activity, limiting the number of possibilities for tornado formation in the Prairie provinces.

Everything is interconnected and that’s how Ontario managed to get ahead of Oklahoma in the annual tornado count.

AN ABNORMAL SEASON ACROSS CANADA CENTERED IN ONTARIO

An average year of active weather across Canada typically produces about 61 tornadoes, over two-thirds of which affect Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

The Prairies are host to most of the country’s tornadoes because summer geography and weather conditions converge to regularly create explosive storms over this region.

It didn’t quite happen in 2021.

The NTP has confirmed 81 tornadoes on land across Canada in 2021. Although this is above the annual average of 61 tornadoes, more than half of these tornadoes have targeted Ontario. The active track of the storms that swept through British Columbia and bypassed the Prairies allowed a series of storms to sweep through Ontario.

None was more memorable than the July 15 outbreak that targeted the Barrie area.

July 15, 2021 Tornado outbreak

A robust midsummer system swept across southern Ontario on the morning of July 15, creating a dangerous combination of instability, lift and wind shear. Rotating thunderstorms developed over the region and spawned six EF-2 tornadoes. One of those tornadoes, which was over half a kilometer in width at one time, caused extensive damage and several injuries just south of Barrie.

Ontario experienced another tornado outbreak in early September when widespread severe thunderstorms produced nine more tornadoes. Investigation teams discovered that two of these tornadoes caused damage to the EF-2.

In total, NTP investigations found that 16 of the province’s 46 confirmed tornadoes were rated EF-2 on the Fujita Enhanced Scale, the level at which meteorologists consider a tornado to have caused “significant” damage.

RARE TORNADOES ATTACHED TO THE CTES

Ontario was not the only province to contend with a strange wave of tornadoes. Some areas that usually only see tornadoes on TV had two.

Stewiacke NS tornado map June 30, 2021

Nova Scotia recorded its first tornado in more than two decades when an EF-1 landed in Stewiacke on the afternoon of June 30.

A storm investigation revealed that the rare tornado remained on the ground for 600m and damaged a farm. A few weeks later, another tornado touched down near Antrim, just 25 km south of Stewiacke.

Meanwhile, British Columbia ended its own year of extreme weather conditions with an “ultra-rare” tornado that struck Vancouver on November 6.

rare

The tornado formed over the water and moved toward the University of British Columbia shore, leaving behind damage to trees. Vancouver’s stable air mass makes tornadoes exceptionally rare in this part of the country; Until that November storm, the city had not recorded a tornado for over 30 years.

THE UNITED STATES HAD A LOWER THAN AVERAGE SEASON – UNTIL DECEMBER

The same pattern that suppressed tornado activity in the Prairies and allowed tornadoes to roam freely across Ontario is the one responsible for an equally bizarre tornado season in the United States.

A typical year in the United States would see about 1,400 reports of tornadoes, the vast majority affecting the plains and southeastern states.

The term “tornado season” is a bit of a misnomer when it comes to weather in the United States. Tornadoes are a threat all year round. Tornado activity is concentrated over the southeast in early spring, moving to the southern plains in late spring. The north-rising jet stream pulls the heart of tornado activity out to the northern plains in mid-summer, eventually returning to the southeastern United States as the fall and winter settles in.

The stubborn model that developed in North America in 2021 disrupted this usual process. We have seen relatively few outbreaks during the year. Two high-risk tornado outbreaks unfolded in Mississippi and Alabama in March. We also saw two unusual outbreaks in New Jersey, of all places.

A severe weather event in late July led to classic supercells with well-defined hook echoes and debris clearly visible on radar. Another outbreak in September, associated with the remnants of Hurricane Ida, produced several powerful tornadoes across New Jersey, including a large EF-3 tornado that appeared to be in Kansas rather than a short drive from New Jersey. York.

(NOAA / SPC) Tornado reports in the United States in 2021
Tornado reports across the United States in 2021. (NOAA / SPC)

The number of tornadoes in the United States is expected to be well below normal through December.

Several rare tornado outbreaks hit the country in December. A powerful EF-4 tornado swept through western Kentucky on December 10, killing more than 70 people on the nation’s deadliest tornado day in more than a decade. The tornado, which devastated several towns in its path, remained on the ground for hundreds of kilometers. A few days later, another major severe weather event produced dozens of tornadoes across the plains and the Midwest.



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How to immigrate to the Canadian province of Alberta https://davidthompsonthings.com/how-to-immigrate-to-the-canadian-province-of-alberta/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 22:32:44 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/how-to-immigrate-to-the-canadian-province-of-alberta/ Last updated on December 29, 2021 Energy-rich Alberta is growing and seeking immigrants to Canada for many jobs as the oil and gas, housing construction and retail industries take off. “The happy days are back! Alberta Finance Minister Travis Toews reportedly said in November when presenting his 2021-2022 semi-annual financial update and economic statement. “The […]]]>


Last updated on December 29, 2021

Energy-rich Alberta is growing and seeking immigrants to Canada for many jobs as the oil and gas, housing construction and retail industries take off.

“The happy days are back! Alberta Finance Minister Travis Toews reportedly said in November when presenting his 2021-2022 semi-annual financial update and economic statement.

“The sky above is clear again, let’s sing a song of joy again, the happy days are here again! “


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Alberta’s labor force participation index, which measures the health of the provincial economy, was up 9.4% at the end of September.

High energy prices fuel oil production

“High energy prices are boosting drilling activity and oil production, while corporate output remains strong. Real estate activity continues to be robust, while private sector construction spending increases, ”says the budget update.

“A number of large investment projects have been announced recently, including Amazon Web Services’ $ 4.3 billion cloud computing center in Calgary and the $ 2.5 billion petrochemical facility at Amazon Web Services. Northern Petrochemical Corp. in Grand Prairie. “

In its latest provincial outlook, TD Economics projects the provincial economy will have grown 5.3% by the end of the year and real GDP will grow 4.6% more next year.

“Alberta has seen a solid recovery in real estate activity this year, with home resales set to increase at the fastest rate in the country,” wrote TD Economists Beata Caranci, Derek Burleton, Rishi Sondhi and Omar Abdelrahman from this provincial perspective.

“Housing starts are also increasing, giving the construction industry a boost. “

Economists are also encouraged by the strong recovery in the energy sector.

“Going forward, only a slight downward trend in oil prices (West Texas Intermediate crude) is expected as additional supply (from the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) comes online. Oil production has already increased by more than 7.4% since the beginning of the year, year on year, ”note the economists.

Alberta exports expected to increase

“But more growth appears to be in the cards, with exports expected to increase on strong US demand. And it’s not just oil. Natural gas prices have also jumped this year, giving an additional boost to government revenues and coffers. “

While the fourth wave of Covid-19 to hit Alberta has dampened its population growth, that wave now appears to be over – and immigration is starting to pick up again.

“Immigration to the province is recovering from the pandemic lows of last year as travel restrictions are lifted and application processing accelerates,” the province’s financial update says.

In the first nine months of this year alone, Alberta has already welcomed 25,650 new permanent residents to the province, or about 11.7% more than the 22,955 new permanent residents who settled there annually. last.

Before the pandemic, immigration to Alberta hovered between 42,000 and 44,000 for about three years.

Then, Covid-19 struck in Canada early last year. The borders were closed. Travel to and from other countries has become difficult. In some cases, non-essential travel was virtually impossible.

Immigration to Alberta has fallen, falling almost 47.5% in 2020 from the previous year.

But, at the current rate of immigration to the province, Alberta could welcome 34,200 new permanent residents this year. This would still be 21.7% below the 2019 pre-pandemic immigration level in the province.

However, that would be about 50 percent more new permanent residents to the province than Alberta received last year.

Two new graduate entrepreneur programs

Alberta remains optimistic on immigration, launching two new programs to attract international graduate entrepreneurs in the first year of the pandemic.

The International Graduate Entrepreneur Immigration Stream opened at the end of October last year and the Foreign Graduate Start-Up Visa Stream, which targets graduates of US universities, opened in January this year.

“Alberta has over 25,000 international post-secondary students, the highest number of any prairie province. And we want more of them to stay after graduation so they don’t take their new business ideas elsewhere, ”said Jason Copping, then Immigration Minister of the United Kingdom. ‘Alberta.

“With this new stream, international graduates can apply to stay and launch new businesses and start-ups, creating new jobs for Albertans and bringing much-needed investments to our province,” he said.

The two components of the Alberta Immigrant Nominee (AINP) program are designed to help Alberta recover from the coronavirus crisis.

The new International Graduate Entrepreneurs stream operates on an Expression of Interest system and is aimed at international graduates of post-secondary institutions in Alberta who wish to establish or operate a business in the province.

Applicants must initially establish or operate their business for at least 12 months while in Alberta on a work permit before being nominated for permanent residence once the terms of a business performance agreement are met.

The other new stream, the International Graduate Start-Up Visa, aims to attract talented international graduates from top U.S. universities and colleges to start businesses and settle in Alberta communities.

Through the AINP, the province welcomes immigrants with the skills and abilities needed to fill labor shortages in Alberta.

Economic immigration programs typically attract nearly half of new permanent residents to the province each year, and their importance has only grown as a source of new immigrants since the start of the pandemic.

Economic immigration grows in importance

In the first nine months of this year, 55.2% of all new permanent residents to Alberta benefited from economic immigration programs.

In addition to the two new components to encourage entrepreneurship in the province by attracting new international graduates, the AINP has three other components.

Alberta Opportunity Stream is designed to simplify the AINP application process, reduce wait times and make the system fairer for applicants who meet residency, work permit and occupation requirements and for their employers. .

The Express Entry stream allows the province to nominate a limited number of qualified candidates from the federal Express Entry pool through periodic draws.

In its first Express Entry draw in six months, Alberta issued invitations to 50 applicants with Comprehensive Ranking System scores as low as 406 in early January of this year. This was the first draw under this section since mid-June last year.

The Independent Farmer Stream is managed by AINP in close collaboration with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry and targets applicants with farm management skills and sufficient financial resources to invest in a farming business in Alberta.

Earlier this year, The Western Investor reported that farmland in Alberta is more expensive than similar land in Saskatchewan or Manitoba, but still a steal compared to the acreage in British Columbia.

In May, an acre of farmland in Manitoba would sell for an average price of $ 2,280 and an acre in Saskatchewan for $ 1,588.

In Alberta, the same acre was selling for an average of $ 3,012 at the time.

The price of an acre of farmland in British Columbia, however, was more than double with an average price of $ 6,675.

Unlike some other provinces, the AINP does not reward candidates whose professions appear on a certain list. Instead, the province publishes a list of ineligible occupations.

Alberta Immigration issues periodic notifications of interest, inviting applicants to apply for an appointment under the AINP Express Entry stream. Details of each draw are generally published approximately one month after the date of the draw.


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Provinces Record 2,154 COVID Cases Over Weekend https://davidthompsonthings.com/provinces-record-2154-covid-cases-over-weekend/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 05:07:37 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/provinces-record-2154-covid-cases-over-weekend/ Manitoba recorded 675 more cases of COVID-19 on Monday, including 71 at Prairie Mountain Health. The province’s COVID-19 dashboard listed 547 active cases for the region, including 18 in hospital including five with active COVID, as well as five in intensive care with one with active COVID. There were 488 new cases reported in Winnipeg, […]]]>



Manitoba recorded 675 more cases of COVID-19 on Monday, including 71 at Prairie Mountain Health.

The province’s COVID-19 dashboard listed 547 active cases for the region, including 18 in hospital including five with active COVID, as well as five in intensive care with one with active COVID.

There were 488 new cases reported in Winnipeg, 62 in Southern Health, 32 in Interlake-Eastern and 22 in Northern Health.

The province recorded 1,479 additional cases on Saturday and Sunday.

Authorities also announced eight more deaths, bringing the death toll to 1,378.

Three of the deaths occurred on Saturday: a woman in her 50s from Prairie Mountain Health, a man in her 20s from Southern Health and a man in his 50s from Southern Health. The 90-year-old woman and the 20-year-old man were both linked to an unspecified variant.

There were two deaths on Sunday, including a woman in her sixties from Southern Health and a man in his thirties from Winnipeg.

All of the deaths reported on Monday are from Southern Health: a man in his 30s, a man in his 40s and a man in his 60s.

The five-day test’s positivity also stands at 19 percent for the province.

»Brandon’s Sun


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Federal Agriculture Minister speaks of relief for BC producers and flood victims https://davidthompsonthings.com/federal-agriculture-minister-speaks-of-relief-for-bc-producers-and-flood-victims/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 02:00:26 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/federal-agriculture-minister-speaks-of-relief-for-bc-producers-and-flood-victims/ The drought in western Canada has been one of the big agricultural stories of 2021. “I was able to travel, testify and meet farmers,” said Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. “But I’m very proud of what we’ve done in partnership with the provinces, to be able to deploy AgriRecovery very quickly and […]]]>

The drought in western Canada has been one of the big agricultural stories of 2021.

“I was able to travel, testify and meet farmers,” said Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. “But I’m very proud of what we’ve done in partnership with the provinces, to be able to deploy AgriRecovery very quickly and in a very nimble manner so that producers get help faster than I can. think. . “

Bibeau noted, “Climate change is definitely a reality, and farmers are the first to be affected and to deal with the situation. We have to work even harder to be resilient, to adapt and to fight against this.

Meanwhile, on the west coast, Bibeau said the recent devastating flooding was another disaster farmers faced in 2021. The minister recently visited British Columbia to get an overview. and see how the federal government can help.

“Obviously, my colleagues from the Canadian Armed Forces and (from the Department of) Transport as well, to provide direct support to farmers in terms of more boots on the ground to support them, but also to strengthen our food supply chain which, again, is resilient, but then we will have to go through the recovery phase. There is a lot of work to be done.

Last year, Bibeau also returned to the agriculture portfolio following the spring federal election. She said it was a privilege to be back in this role.

“I love the agricultural sector, representing our rural and agricultural regions,” she noted. “I was able to forge relationships with representatives of the various agricultural sectors across the country, with my counterparts in the provinces as well, and indeed, we started the discussion around the next partnership agreement for 2023 to 2028. I am very, very glad to be back. “

Additional files on Bibeau’s desk for 2022 include a hope of advancing the government’s agri-environmental agenda and addressing labor shortages in the sector.


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