West Canada – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 08:36:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://davidthompsonthings.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png West Canada – David Thompson Things http://davidthompsonthings.com/ 32 32 Valor Unveils Six New Canadian Uranium Targets https://davidthompsonthings.com/valor-unveils-six-new-canadian-uranium-targets/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 08:36:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/valor-unveils-six-new-canadian-uranium-targets/ ASX-listed Valor Resources has identified six high-priority drill targets following an initial site visit, historical data review and airborne gravity survey at its Hidden uranium project. Bay in Canada. The project is strategically located approximately 20 km south of the revered Rabbit Lake mine where over 200 million ounces of uranium concentrate were once produced. […]]]>

ASX-listed Valor Resources has identified six high-priority drill targets following an initial site visit, historical data review and airborne gravity survey at its Hidden uranium project. Bay in Canada. The project is strategically located approximately 20 km south of the revered Rabbit Lake mine where over 200 million ounces of uranium concentrate were once produced.

Management says Hidden Bay represents one of its most promising opportunities in the famed Athabasca Basin and the company may soon begin a first pass drilling program at the site – pending a radon test.

The tests are commonly used to identify the presence of naturally occurring radioactive gases.

The company says its new targets at Hidden Bay appear to be in a similar geological setting to Cameco’s historic Rabbit Bay mine. Cameco is one of the largest uranium producers in the world and is currently responsible for approximately 16% of global production from its assets in Canada and Kazakhstan.

The company’s Rabbit Bay mine was once considered North America’s oldest uranium mine producing concentrate for more than four decades until it was placed under care and maintenance in 2016.

Given the ground’s strong history, Valor has designated the area as its primary exploration target and says the area presents a good opportunity to detect subsurface and misconformity-type uranium deposits – two of the main producing assets. raw material.

The Athabasca Basin, where the company unveiled its six new targets, is rich in deposits and is among the most productive uranium hotspots in the world.

Adding to the appeal of the ground is its limited exploration. Valor says only one hole has been dug around its Hidden Bay buildings in the past 35 years.

The company is now looking to execute the rule in the field using modern exploration techniques – something that has yet to be completed in Hidden Bay.

Valor’s Hidden Bay project covers 32 square kilometers and is located approximately 800 km north of Saskatoon in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan.

The country is something of a uranium powerhouse, producing about 390,000 metric tons a year with grades of up to 20% uranium, almost 100 times more than the world average.

A significant portion of it is exported, ending up in nuclear power plants which ultimately provide electricity.

The price of uranium is currently hovering around US$49 per pound, down from yearly highs of US$58, on fears of lower demand.

Is your ASX-listed company doing anything interesting? Contact: matt.birney@wanews.com.au

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8 things to do for free in Ottawa this summer https://davidthompsonthings.com/8-things-to-do-for-free-in-ottawa-this-summer/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/8-things-to-do-for-free-in-ottawa-this-summer/ With tourist season in full swing, there are plenty of activities in Ottawa you can do without breaking your budget. You can spend a Thursday night at several Ottawa museums, visit the Parliament Buildings, or enjoy a free cup of coffee on Fridays. CTVNewsOttawa.ca takes a look at eight things you can do for free […]]]>

With tourist season in full swing, there are plenty of activities in Ottawa you can do without breaking your budget.

You can spend a Thursday night at several Ottawa museums, visit the Parliament Buildings, or enjoy a free cup of coffee on Fridays.

CTVNewsOttawa.ca takes a look at eight things you can do for free in Ottawa this summer.

“THIRD NIGHT ON US”

Ottawa Tourism is footing the bill for visitors to spend a third night in an Ottawa hotel room this summer and fall.

The “Stay at 3rd a free night in Ottawa! allows Ottawa Tourism to cover the third night of a hotel stay if visitors book three or more nights at a participating Ottawa hotel.

For more information, visit the Ottawa Tourism website.

Ottawa Tourism says the campaign so far has exceeded its expectations.

“Ottawa Tourism is very pleased with the Third Night On Us promotion which runs until October 10, 2022. While we cannot share exact numbers, we can say that the results of the campaign exceed our initial expectations,” said said Ottawa Tourism in a statement to CTV News Ottawa.

“We have also seen the average length of stay in our destination increase since the start of the campaign, and it is now over 3 nights.

“We are confident that this promotion has led to more visitors and more customers not only for hotels, but also for attractions, museums, festivals, restaurants, tours, transportation providers, stores and others. local businesses. Extending the length of stay means more meals in restaurants, more chances to take a tour or visit a museum, more time to visit a new neighborhood, etc., etc.

Ontario residents visiting Ottawa are also eligible for the Ontario Accommodation Tax Credit, allowing people to claim 20% of their eligible accommodation expenses when they file their 2022 tax returns.

Liberal MP David Graham talks to parliamentary guards in the House of Commons before the start of the first session in the West Block on Monday, January 28, 2019 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

THURSDAY EVENINGS AT THE MUSEUM

You can visit several museums in Ottawa and Gatineau for free on Thursday evenings.

Here is an overview of the museums’ free admission times on Thursdays.

FREE ADMISSION TO MUSEUMS

You can visit three museums in Ottawa for free between 4 p.m. and 5 p.m., when the museums are open.

Admission is free from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. to the Canada Agriculture and Food Museum (seven days a week), the Canada Science and Technology Museum (seven days a week) and the Aviation and Space Canada (Thursday to Monday), but tickets must be booked in advance.

VISIT THE PARLIAMENTARY BUILDINGS

Visit the West Block of Parliament Hill and the Senate of Canada Building.

The Government of Canada offers free guided tours of the Houses of Canada’s Parliament throughout the summer.

Visit the Senate at the Senate of Canada Building – Ottawa’s historic train station – to learn about the role and history of Canada’s Upper House.

You can also learn about the history, roles, art and architecture of the House of Commons in the recently restored West Block.

For tour times and tickets, visit https://rts.parl.ca/

Liberal MP David Graham talks to parliamentary guards in the House of Commons before the start of the first session in the West Block on Monday, January 28, 2019 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

NORTHERN LIGHTS – SOUND AND LIGHT SHOW

Enjoy an exciting themed journey through Canada’s history for free on Parliament Hill.

The Aurora Borealis sound and light show is a unique multimedia experience that showcases Canada’s great achievements and milestones in our history.

Northern Lights takes place Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday, starting at 9:30 p.m. in August.

For more information, visit the Northern Lights website.

BY-MARKET BOP

Enjoy the music every Thursday night in the ByWard Market with “ByWard Bops”

Don’t miss a free concert every Thursday at George Street Plaza.

For more information visit https://www.byward-market.com/events

FREE DRIP COFFEE ON FRIDAY

The Ministry of Coffee is organizing “Filter Fridays” this summer.

Free drip coffee will be available on Fridays at the Coffee Ministry locations at 274 Elgin Street, 1013 Wellington Street, 18 Beechwood Avenue and the Via Rail station.

“We give back to our community and our friends. By the end of the summer, we are offering free filter coffee to all our customers on Fridays,” the Coffee Ministry said.

“Come on Fridays and enjoy a fresh cup of our ministry drip coffee – roasted in the heart of Ottawa on a zero-emission roaster.”

CHILDREN EAT FREE IN RESTAURANTS

Kids can eat free at many Ottawa restaurants.

Zak’s Diner – Kids 10 and under eat free Sunday through Thursday (excluding holidays) from 4 p.m. to closing, with the purchase of an adult meal and drink. Offer available at Zak’s Diner restaurants in the ByWard Market, on Elgin Street and in Kanata. Visit the restaurant’s website for details.

Jonny Canuck’s – Kids eat free on Sundays between 4 p.m. and 9 p.m. For more information, visit the restaurant’s website.

The Barley Mow – Kids eat free on Sundays.

Mandarin Restaurant – Children 4 and under eat free at the buffet (up to two children per paying adult) h

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A Canadian village razed by a forest fire fights to protect its future against the climate https://davidthompsonthings.com/a-canadian-village-razed-by-a-forest-fire-fights-to-protect-its-future-against-the-climate/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 10:07:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/a-canadian-village-razed-by-a-forest-fire-fights-to-protect-its-future-against-the-climate/ REVELSTOKE, British Columbia, Aug 5 (Reuters) – A year after a wildfire destroyed the village of Lytton in western Canada, residents, municipal leaders and the government of British Columbia are grappling with the slow and costly reality of sustaining a community against climate currency. The remote village sits at the confluence of the Fraser and […]]]>

REVELSTOKE, British Columbia, Aug 5 (Reuters) – A year after a wildfire destroyed the village of Lytton in western Canada, residents, municipal leaders and the government of British Columbia are grappling with the slow and costly reality of sustaining a community against climate currency.

The remote village sits at the confluence of the Fraser and Thompson rivers in the high, dry mountains of interior British Columbia, making it a target for fires and landslides. In June 2021, 90% of Lytton’s structures burned down, a day after the village recorded the hottest temperature on record in Canada. Read more

Now, managers have a unique opportunity to rebuild an entire community from the ground up using fire-resistant materials and energy-efficient building standards.

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

But long-term disaster mitigation plans and net-zero ambitions come up against the realities of human impatience and insurer reimbursement limits. Exhausted residents, many of whom still live in temporary accommodation, want to rebuild homes and move on with their lives.

“There is a clear difference between what would be ideal and what is realistic,” said Tricia Thorpe, 61, who lost her home in the fire.

“I don’t think anyone has a problem with smart fireproof construction, but they’re trying to build a model village. They’re talking about solar sidewalks (panels).”

As climate change intensifies, the risk of destructive weather increases, prompting a focus on how communities are built.

Insured severe weather damage in Canada reached C$2.1 billion ($1.63 billion) last year, according to the Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC), including C$102 million for the Lytton fire. Since 1983, Canadian insurers have averaged approximately C$934 million per year in weather-related losses.

The wrangling over how to restore Lytton highlights the messy reality of climate adaptation, and the costs and delays people are willing to incur to reduce carbon emissions and mitigate fire risk.

In the village of 300 inhabitants, some lofty ambitions have already been set aside in favor of faster reconstruction.

Lytton Council wanted to pass building regulations that require net-zero emissions homes, but rolled them back to lower energy efficiency standards after residents pushed back.

The village has also considered burying all of its power lines to reduce fire risk, a three-year process, but is now installing temporary overhead lines instead to do the job in nine months.

“Sometimes I get frustrated with the lack of knowledge and the fact that locals think we’re trying to stop them from rebuilding,” Lytton Mayor Jan Polderman said.

“We could become a first-generation model for net zero.”

Polderman said solar panel sidewalks — reinforced solar panels in place of sidewalks on city sidewalks — and wind power could power streetlights and municipal buildings.

OPENING OF NEW AREAS

In the 13 months since the fire, little progress has been made on restoration, with only a quarter of properties cleared of ash and debris.

The local council is still finalizing fire safety bylaws which they say will be the most comprehensive ever in Canada and will make Lytton the most protected community in the country.

The new regulations, based on the National Research Council of Canada’s expertise on community development in wildfire-prone regions, cover everything from building materials to landscaping and maintenance. by what can be stored on properties.

Finalizing the regulations and consulting the community took months.

“I’m sure if we had just said, ‘Let’s get people home as soon as possible,’ it would have been faster, but we could be in the same situation in a few years,” said Kelsey Winter, chair of the BC FireSmart Committee. , a provincial organization responsible for community engagement in Lytton.

“It’s taking longer than a lot of people wanted, but Lytton is breaking new ground.”

Other complications hampered the recovery. Record flooding in November swept away local highways, which were also closed intermittently over the winter to fight avalanches.

Additionally, the village is on Nlaka’pamux First Nation territory and residents require archaeological surveys to verify native artifacts prior to reconstruction. Lytton First Nation, part of the Nlaka’pamux, also lost dozens of homes in the 2021 fire.

INSURANCE LIMITS

About 60% of Lytton residents were uninsured or underinsured, leading to delays in debris removal as residents and insurers debated who should pay. In March, the province announced it would provide C$18.4 million to cover debris removal, archaeological surveys and soil remediation.

Meanwhile, residents are running out of time as temporary subsistence allowances provided by insurers, usually for 18 to 24 months after a disaster, are coming to an end. Adding to the challenges, insurers are reluctant to pay for home upgrades that are enshrined in new building regulations.

“Insurance restores the building you had, not the building you want,” said Aaron Sutherland, vice president of the Pacific Region at Insurance Bureau of Canada.

The Canadian Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction (ICLR), which helped develop Lytton’s fire safety regulations, estimates their implementation would add about C$5,000 to rebuilding costs.

Sutherland said if insurers see the benefits of fire resistance, upgrades to improve energy efficiency and reduce carbon emissions will add “tens of thousands” of dollars per home.

“When people were buying insurance policies, they were based on the statutes of the day and what insurers expected to pay,” he added.

Emissions from buildings account for 13% of Canada’s total greenhouse gas production and reducing them is a key part of the Canadian government‘s climate goals.

Ottawa will help make up some of the shortfall, providing C$6 million to homeowners with basic reconstruction insurance who want to rebuild net-zero or fire-rated homes.

Meanwhile, Lytton faces another wildfire season. On July 14, a wildfire broke out across the river from Lytton, destroying at least six properties.

Last year, 1,642 wildfires burned 869,279 hectares (2.1 million acres) in British Columbia, which is higher than the 2010-2020 average of 1,352 fires and 348,917 hectares burned.

Some landlords are fed up with delays. Tricia Thorpe, who lives just outside the village limits, is rebuilding without planning permission and others are moving elsewhere.

“I don’t expect to ever rebuild, even if my intention was to,” said retired nurse Michele Feist, 59, whose 100-year-old bright yellow house burned down. “The response has been inadequate on all levels. I’m not a bitter person and I try to be realistic about things, but I miss my city.”

($1 = 1.2856 Canadian dollars)

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Reporting by Nia Williams in British Columbia Editing by Marguerita Choy

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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The Canadian team begins to prepare for a summer World Junior Men’s Hockey Championship https://davidthompsonthings.com/the-canadian-team-begins-to-prepare-for-a-summer-world-junior-mens-hockey-championship/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 00:07:26 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/the-canadian-team-begins-to-prepare-for-a-summer-world-junior-mens-hockey-championship/ CALGARY — Team Canada began preparations for the 2.0 edition of the 2022 World Junior Men’s Hockey Championship in Edmonton on Tuesday. The host nation kicks off the August 9-20 championship on August 10 against Latvia at Rogers Place. CALGARY — Team Canada began preparations for the 2.0 edition of the 2022 World Junior Men’s […]]]>

CALGARY — Team Canada began preparations for the 2.0 edition of the 2022 World Junior Men’s Hockey Championship in Edmonton on Tuesday. The host nation kicks off the August 9-20 championship on August 10 against Latvia at Rogers Place.

CALGARY — Team Canada began preparations for the 2.0 edition of the 2022 World Junior Men’s Hockey Championship in Edmonton on Tuesday.

The host nation kicks off the August 9-20 championship on August 10 against Latvia at Rogers Place.

The 10-nation tournament will be minus Russia banned from participation by the International Ice Hockey Federation due to that country’s invasion of Ukraine.

The original 2022 championship in Edmonton and Red Deer, Alta., was canceled Dec. 29 after just four days due to rising COVID-19 cases among players and officials, which forced the forfeits of matches.

Hockey Canada hosts this world juniors under the shadow of federal government scrutiny and an outpouring of public criticism for its handling of alleged sexual assaults by members of previous junior men’s teams in 2018 and 2003.

Sheldon Kennedy, former NHL player and victims’ rights advocate, is among those calling for the resignation of Hockey Canada president Scott Smith and the board of directors.

Enhanced character scouting for all high-level players was part of a list of remedies Hockey Canada announced in an action plan last month.

“We definitely have a big weight on our shoulders,” said forward Mason McTavish, who was named Canada’s captain Tuesday as camp opened in Calgary.

“We have an opportunity, not obviously to clear the name, but maybe help improve and bring back…this is Canada and the world junior championships are such a great event for Canadians in particular . We have a great opportunity to…help improve and take another step towards getting back to where we were.”

The 25 players named to the junior roster on Monday participated in a code of conduct seminar that evening, presented by Hockey Canada director of sport safety Natasha Johnston.

Another session on sexual violence led by the Calgary Communities Against Sexual Abuse was scheduled for Tuesday.

“It’s obviously something very serious,” said forward Kent Johnson. “You are playing for the nation and all the kids at home are watching. I think it’s always an honor to represent your country.”

The IIHF Men’s Under-20 event is considered a showcase of the best male under-19 hockey talent on the planet.

The IIHF allowed players born in 2002 who turned 20 to remain eligible to participate in the summer revamp.

Cameron returns as Canada’s head coach in a different scenario with no selection camp and a major championship to play in mid-summer after a short camp.

“A little weird to be honest with you,” Cameron said at the Tsuut’ina Nation’s 7 Chiefs Sportsplex. “Two good things about it for me is that I don’t have to fire anyone. That’s the hardest part of this job when you have to send kids home. And the second part is that I know the bulk of the players.”

The goaltending trio of Dylan Garand, Sebastian Cossa and Brett Brochu are back, but the roster has undergone nine player changes from December’s roster.

Former captain Kaiden Guhle and top defender Owen Power did not return. Neither forward Shane Wright, the fourth pick in the NHL Draft last month, nor Winnipeg Jets forward Cole Perfetti.

Regina Pats forward Connor Bedard, the first overall pick in the 2023 NHL Draft, and Olympic Men’s Team forwards McTavish and Johnson are the headliners for Canada’s forwards in Edmonton.

“We only have eight days to prepare, which is a little less than usual,” Bedard said. “I think everyone comes in with the mindset of trying to win a gold medal. We’re doing everything we can in training and in the gym these first few days to start that goal.”

Jack Thompson, who sat out of December’s selection camp due to the COVID-19 quarantine, and Daemon Hunt were added to the August roster on defense.

Tyson Foerster, Nathan Gaucher, Riley Kidney, Zack Ostapchuk, Brennan Othman, William Dufour and Joshua Roy replaced Wright, Perfetti, Xavier Bourgeault, Mavrik Bourque, Jake Neighbors, Justin Sourdif and Dylan Guenther.

Cameron would not comment on the players who withdrew.

“I just focus on the guys I have here,” he said.

Garand is the only returning player from the Canadian team that won world junior silver in Edmonton in 2021.

“There’s a bit more attention on the tournament this year being sort of the first world junior since the allegations and all that,” Garand said.

“For us and our team, we’re just here to focus on hockey and ultimately winning a gold medal is our goal.”

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on August 2, 2022.

Donna Spencer, The Canadian Press

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‘A specific form of anti-black racism’: Academics want Canadian apology for slavery https://davidthompsonthings.com/a-specific-form-of-anti-black-racism-academics-want-canadian-apology-for-slavery/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 16:38:40 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/a-specific-form-of-anti-black-racism-academics-want-canadian-apology-for-slavery/ Historian Elise Harding-Davis says Canada‘s unanimous vote last year to proclaim August 1 Emancipation Day rings hollow without a federal apology for slavery. Historian Elise Harding-Davis says Canada’s unanimous vote last year to proclaim August 1 Emancipation Day rings hollow without a federal apology for slavery. The author and former curator of the Amherstburg Liberty […]]]>

Historian Elise Harding-Davis says Canada‘s unanimous vote last year to proclaim August 1 Emancipation Day rings hollow without a federal apology for slavery.

Historian Elise Harding-Davis says Canada’s unanimous vote last year to proclaim August 1 Emancipation Day rings hollow without a federal apology for slavery.

The author and former curator of the Amherstburg Liberty Museum in Ontario says the proclamation is an acknowledgment that slavery and its aftermath deeply harmed black people in Canada.

She adds that an apology would be a long-awaited recognition of the contributions of black people to the history and creation of Canada.

Although Emancipation Day recognizes the day in 1834 when slavery was abolished in most British colonies, including Canada, Harding-Davis says the mindset and societal structures that allowed have not ended.

Dalhousie University history professor Afua Cooper has been demanding an apology from Ottawa since 2007, and she noted in an interview that other groups have received apologies in the meantime.

The lead researcher of the Black People’s History of Canada project says Ottawa’s refusal to apologize for the country’s history of black enslavement is a form of anti-black racism.

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on July 31, 2022.

The Canadian Press

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Parents face difficult conversations and decisions following Hockey Canada controversies https://davidthompsonthings.com/parents-face-difficult-conversations-and-decisions-following-hockey-canada-controversies/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 17:42:57 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/parents-face-difficult-conversations-and-decisions-following-hockey-canada-controversies/ Sylvain Perrier was having lunch with his wife and daughter when he heard the news that Hockey Canada was involved in another gang sexual assault investigation, this time involving the 2003 World Junior Team. Sylvain Perrier was having lunch with his wife and daughter when he heard the news that Hockey Canada was involved in […]]]>

Sylvain Perrier was having lunch with his wife and daughter when he heard the news that Hockey Canada was involved in another gang sexual assault investigation, this time involving the 2003 World Junior Team.

Sylvain Perrier was having lunch with his wife and daughter when he heard the news that Hockey Canada was involved in another gang sexual assault investigation, this time involving the 2003 World Junior Team.

Turning to his wife, he began speaking to her in French about the allegations when his daughter chimed in, asking what they were talking about.

“For a second my brain froze and I was like, ‘Oh man, she’s only 11,'” Perrier said. “I tried to explain it, but there’s no good way to explain it, is there?”

Perrier and his family had stopped at a restaurant while driving from their home in Gatineau, Que., to Sudbury, Ont., for a hockey tournament his daughter was playing. Because her daughter is familiar with the Hockey Canada brand, she could understand that her parents were talking about the sport she loves.

“So I said ‘those guys, they did bad things to that girl. And the person who was supposed to help that girl, well, they just gave her money and told her to shut up’ “, said Perrier. “That’s kind of how I explained it. I mean, I don’t know if I did a good job. But I don’t know the best way to explain a situation like that. “

Hockey Canada has had its funding from the federal government and corporate sponsors suspended following allegations of sexual assault involving eight members of the 2018 men’s junior hockey team.

These allegations came to light after it was reported that Hockey Canada paid an undisclosed settlement to the plaintiff after she sued the organization, the Canadian Hockey League, and the eight Anonymous Players. The woman was looking for $3.55 million.

Hockey Canada later confirmed that it maintains a fund that draws from minor hockey membership fees to pay for uninsured liabilities, including sexual misconduct claims. the organization has since said the fund will no longer be used to pay claims over the sexual assault allegations.

Hockey Canada announced on July 22 that another sexual assault investigation was underway involving members of the 2003 junior team.

Erin Dixon, who has a 14-year-old daughter and a 10-year-old son, said she was angry to learn her children’s tuition fees had partly been donated to a fund used to pay claims for sexual misconduct.

“I just don’t think that’s where kids’ sports fees should go and, of course, this behavior should in no way be condoned or supported,” said Dixon of Kingston, Ont. “It’s a bit of a hit and it’s no surprise to hear about the second situation (allegations from 2003) coming out now.

“With the amount of money they have set aside, I’m going to expect us to hear more, there will be more of this.”

Perrier said he felt “disgusted” that his daughter’s tuition went to the fund.

“It’s hard to get used to it,” Perrier said as his daughter took to the ice during her tournament. “How can this happen? How can Hockey Canada, which is supposed to be almost a church for every girl and boy who plays hockey, go and protect rapists and abusers? With our money?”

Dixon said she was “appalled” that some of her fees were used to pay sexual assault claims when there were more pressing and morally sound issues the money could have supported.

“To say that there are children who can’t even afford to play, and that part of the fee goes to that instead, is just wrong on so, so many levels,” said Dixon, who played competitive hockey into adulthood. “So many things are affected here. Women’s hockey is important to me.

“The amount of money invested in this fund could have done a lot for women’s hockey.”

Ongoing controversies surrounding Hockey Canada and its use of registration fees are forcing parents to make difficult decisions, balancing their children’s desire to play hockey with ethical considerations.

Courtney Adams of Sudbury had planned to enroll her four-year-old son in hockey for the first time this fall, but the sexual assault allegations made her think twice. She said how Hockey Canada handles the next few weeks will dictate how her family proceeds.

“If there are no real changes within the Hockey Canada leadership group and a real will to change, not just the words, but the actions, there is a chance that in September we won’t. ‘might not sign up for hockey,’ Adams said, adding that it’s not just about where his money would go, but about making wise decisions as a parent.

“We also don’t like the idea that he’s in a culture that allows that to happen. Yes, he’s young now, but if hockey is something he loves and he wants to stay in getting older, in his teenage years, that’s not the culture we’d want him to be involved in.”

All three parents said hockey culture is in crisis and cited several other controversies as examples.

Perrier noted that in his neighborhood, a local under-15 hockey team had to suspend six of its players and Hockey Quebec canceled the team’s final two triple-A games of the season after allegations of racism.

Dixon, a die-hard Canadiens fan, said she was incredibly disappointed when the Montreal Canadiens drafted defenseman Logan Mailloux after he was found guilty of sexual misconduct in 2020. Mailloux had waived his draft eligibility so he could focus on reconciliation and personal growth, but was picked by Montreal in the first round anyway.

Adams said she was also concerned about the sexual assault trial of Vancouver Canucks forward Jake Virtanen, who was also a member of Canada’s 2016 junior team. Virtanen was found not guilty by a jury on Tuesday after Adams spoke to The Canadian Press.

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on July 29, 2022.

John Chidley-Hill, The Canadian Press

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New details revealed in year-old case of alleged indignity to the human body https://davidthompsonthings.com/new-details-revealed-in-year-old-case-of-alleged-indignity-to-the-human-body/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/new-details-revealed-in-year-old-case-of-alleged-indignity-to-the-human-body/ More than a year after the body of a missing woman from Saint John in the north was discovered, new details about the case have emerged in court documents. The body of Courtney Dawn MacKenzie, 27, was found in a “closet/storage space” on the third floor of 40 Victoria Street on May 11, 2021, the […]]]>

More than a year after the body of a missing woman from Saint John in the north was discovered, new details about the case have emerged in court documents.

The body of Courtney Dawn MacKenzie, 27, was found in a “closet/storage space” on the third floor of 40 Victoria Street on May 11, 2021, the documents show.

And in the seven days before the body was discovered, someone “interfered inappropriately”.

MacKenzie, the mother of a young son, was reported missing on May 8.

The latest police update on the investigation was released nearly 11 months ago. At that time, they said they were continuing to investigate “the suspicious circumstances” of his death.

“Currently, the Major Crimes Unit is investigating indignity over a dead human body. Homicide has not been ruled out,” a statement said.

An autopsy was performed, but the cause of MacKenzie’s death was never revealed.

“The investigation continues to evolve as investigators diligently interview witnesses, review physical and electronic records, and collect and analyze forensic evidence,” Saint John Police said.

Last confirmed person to have been in contact with the victim

Court documents show police found Terrance Joseph (TJ) Keleher was the last confirmed person to have had contact with MacKenzie on May 4.

He lived in Apt. 3 of the building where MacKenzie’s body was found, according to court documents. Lawrence Keleher and Ashley Stevens also lived in this apartment.

No charges have been laid. Court documents do not identify anyone as a suspect and do not indicate whether police have any suspects.

Police have never said how MacKenzie’s body was discovered at 40 Victoria Street, or revealed the cause of her death. (Graham Thompson/CBC)

The investigation is still ongoing, lead investigator Const. Neal Fowler told the Court of Queen’s Bench in an affidavit dated May 31, 2022.

Fowler filed the affidavit in support of a Crown request asking a judge to allow police to keep the items seized in the searches for another year.

About 200 items seized

Police seized about 200 items with four search warrants, two warrants to obtain bodily substances for forensic DNA analysis and one warrantless seizure, the documents show.

The majority of the items were seized as part of an initial search, carried out at 40 Victoria Street between May 12 and 17. The warrant was for Apt. 3, as well as Apt. 2, the front and rear stairwells of the building and the rear yard.

Among the exhibits seized were bloodstains found in a small room and on the front stairs, as well as swabs from several other stains, a fingernail from the back stairwell and used needles.

Police have redacted several items from the list of exhibits seized at 40 Victoria Street to “protect the integrity of the investigation”. (Court of Queen’s Bench)

Police also seized an AR rifle, two gas masks, a box of .22 cartridges and bear spray.

Many other seized items were blacked out from court documents, under an interim sealing order granted by Judge Kathryn Gregory on June 15 to “prevent the disclosure of withheld information that is not publicly known and necessary to protect the integrity of the ongoing investigation.”

“Heavy Hearts”

MacKenzie’s mother, Beverley MacKenzie, did not immediately respond to an interview request.

MacKenzie’s family announced his unexpected death with “heavy hearts”. The obituary said she would be missed by her young son, the boy’s father, parents, siblings and several other extended family members.

The mourners described her as an “incredible, loving and caring” friend, with a “strong, stubborn attitude”, who made people laugh and gave “the most amazing hugs”.

Huge amount of information

The other police searches were conducted between June 11 and September 29, according to court documents.

At a local impound, officers took swabs from two cars, including stains from the driver’s seat of a Mercury Sable, near the driver’s door latch and the driver’s sun visor mirror. Among the items seized from a Hyundai Elantra were a machete and a red high-heeled shoe.

Some of the other items seized during the searches include:

  • Cell phones of TJ Keleher and Ashley Stevens.
  • Mouth swabs of Lawrence Keleher, 35, and James Burnside, 38, for forensic DNA analysis. Burnside’s connection to the case is unclear from court documents.

Fowler, the lead investigator, said in his affidavit that keeping the seized items longer would help the investigation and that evidence may be required if the case goes to court.

“There is an enormous amount of data and/or information that has been obtained from the clearances granted,” said Fowler, an 18-year-old veteran of the force. “Given the complexity of this investigation, I have not been able to fully analyze and/or assess all of the evidence.”

I believe that the continued detention of the seized exhibits is necessary for the purposes of this investigation and that it is in the interests of justice to do so.– Neal Fowler, Principal Investigator

The police were initially allowed to keep the items for three months, but Provincial Court judges later extended that to a year from the date of seizure. These orders all expired in May.

Fowler requested an extension until May 10, 2023 or until the material is needed for a preliminary investigation, trial or other proceeding.

“I am satisfied that the continued detention of the seized exhibits is necessary for the purposes of this investigation and that it is in the interests of justice to do so,” he said.

In the June 1 Crown request, prosecutor Jill Knee said detention of the seized items “is reasonably required due to the complex nature of the investigation.”

Gregory granted a maximum one-year extension on June 13.

Bloodstains found on the front stairs and in a small room at 40 Victoria Street reveal court documents. (Graham Thompson/CBC)

At the start of the investigation, police asked anyone who spoke to or saw MacKenzie between May 3 and May 11, 2021, or anyone with information about him during that time to contact them.

They were also looking for video security footage in the areas of Victoria Street on the north end, or St. James Street West and Buena Vista Avenue on the west side between May 2 and May 11, 2021.

“Saint John Police would like to thank the family and the public for their patience, as investigations of this nature are often complex and time-consuming,” the September 1 statement read.

Indignity to a dead human body carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison.

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Canadian Brooke Henderson takes a 2-stroke lead in the final round at Evian https://davidthompsonthings.com/canadian-brooke-henderson-takes-a-2-stroke-lead-in-the-final-round-at-evian/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 16:31:01 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/canadian-brooke-henderson-takes-a-2-stroke-lead-in-the-final-round-at-evian/ EVIAN-LES-BAINS, France (AP) — Brooke Henderson stood over a three-foot birdie putt on the 18th green, a three-stroke lead heading into the final round of the Evian Championship seemingly at her thank you. EVIAN-LES-BAINS, France (AP) — Brooke Henderson stood over a three-foot birdie putt on the 18th green, a three-stroke lead heading into the […]]]>

EVIAN-LES-BAINS, France (AP) — Brooke Henderson stood over a three-foot birdie putt on the 18th green, a three-stroke lead heading into the final round of the Evian Championship seemingly at her thank you.

EVIAN-LES-BAINS, France (AP) — Brooke Henderson stood over a three-foot birdie putt on the 18th green, a three-stroke lead heading into the final round of the Evian Championship seemingly at her thank you.

For the first time on Saturday — possibly all week, given her dominance of the fourth women’s major of the year — her stroke let her down.

Henderson missed it on the left, to the gasps of spectators around the green of the Evian Resort Golf Club. The Canadian did not believe it. Probably those hoping to hunt her on Sunday too.

Seeking her second major title after the PGA Women’s Championship in 2016, Henderson had to settle for a 3-under 68 in the third round and a two-stroke lead over the par 17-under two on the record 54 holes for the tournament.

The Smiths Falls, Ont., product is still in a strong position after opening with two straight 64s, but that missed putt at 18 could prove costly.

Henderson’s closest challengers are a former No. 1 and a personal breakthrough player at a major tournament.

So Yeon Ryu, a two-time major winner from South Korea, shot 65 after three birdies on her last four holes and was alone in second place. The highest-ranked player in 2017, when she won the ANA Inspiration for her second major, she hasn’t been this deep in any of the top five tournaments in women’s golf for three years.

Two strokes down on 13 under was Sophia Schubert, ranked No. 283 and without a top 50 in a major. The American birdied her last four holes for a 66 and was alone in new territory in third place in her fifth major tournament appearance.

Olympic champion Nelly Korda started the third round in second place, three shots behind Henderson, but could only shoot 71 – the worst score in the current top 20 on a hot, calm day when only a few tough placements remained very low. card scores.

Korda was 11 under, six shots off the lead and tied at five for sixth with, among others, the top-ranked Jin Young Ko (67).

Above them tied for fourth, five behind Henderson, were Carlota Ciganda (67) and Sei Young Kim (68).

If we rely on the end of the 2021 tournament, there is enough to play on Sunday.

Minjee Lee overcame a seven-stroke deficit to third-round leader Lee Jeong-eun in the final round last year and beat her in the playoffs.

___

More AP Golf: https://apnews.com/hub/golf and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

The Associated Press







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Road users benefit from Highway 14 improvements https://davidthompsonthings.com/road-users-benefit-from-highway-14-improvements/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 18:38:11 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/road-users-benefit-from-highway-14-improvements/ Drivers, cyclists and pedestrians can expect safer and smoother travel now that improvements to Highway 14 between Otter Point Road and Woodhaven Road are nearing completion, a major milestone in the project. improving the Highway 14 corridor. The project included the resurfacing of 11 kilometers of the freeway west of Sooke and the construction of […]]]>

Drivers, cyclists and pedestrians can expect safer and smoother travel now that improvements to Highway 14 between Otter Point Road and Woodhaven Road are nearing completion, a major milestone in the project. improving the Highway 14 corridor.

The project included the resurfacing of 11 kilometers of the freeway west of Sooke and the construction of slow moving vehicle stops west of Invermuir Road for eastbound traffic and west of Shirley for the westbound traffic.

In addition, 1.2 meter paved shoulders have been added on both sides of this section of Highway 14, significantly improving safety for people using active modes of travel along the rural corridor.

Other improvements include:

  • installation of concrete barriers on some roadsides and approaches to bridges to improve safety;
  • pavement marking improvements, including reflective centerline markers and painted lines to separate travel lanes from shoulders;
  • road base upgrades in sections around the Kirby and Muir Creek locations to reinforce the driving surface, improving resilience;
  • drainage improvements to prevent flooding on road slopes during heavy rains; and
  • stabilization of slopes at selected locations to mitigate the risk of slope failure.

The more than $13 million project is part of the nearly $86 million Highway 14 Corridor Improvement Project, carried out in partnership with the Government of Canada. This project is a collection of improvements that will improve safety and travel times, including better transit access and active transportation options, for people along Highway 14. the only east-west connection serving the west shore of Vancouver Island.

Quotation:

Harjit S. Sajjan, Federal Minister for International Development and Minister responsible for the Pacific Economic Development Agency of Canada, on behalf of Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, Infrastructure and Communities –

“The completion of the Highway 14 upgrades is great news for commuters. By improving busy roads, we help people get to where they need to be in a safer and smoother way. Our government will continue to partner with the Government of British Columbia to invest in the success of our communities.

Prime Minister John Horgan, MP for Langford-Juan de Fuca –

“Langford is one of the fastest growing communities in British Columbia, and the section of Highway 14 between Langford and Sooke is a critical corridor to support continued growth. Residents and visitors to Westshore communities can now count on a safer highway that will withstand extreme weather conditions and provide more space for pedestrians, cyclists and motorists.

Rob Fleming, British Columbia Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure –

“With the growth of Westshore communities and the importance of this highway to tourism and recreation in the South Island, it is imperative that we have infrastructure that can accommodate more people and more modes of travel. People who rely on Highway 14 to get to work and school, and those visiting this beautiful region, will now have a safer route with more options for their journey.

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Get up early for those attending Pope’s Mass near Quebec City while visiting Canada https://davidthompsonthings.com/get-up-early-for-those-attending-popes-mass-near-quebec-city-while-visiting-canada/ Sun, 17 Jul 2022 08:10:01 +0000 https://davidthompsonthings.com/get-up-early-for-those-attending-popes-mass-near-quebec-city-while-visiting-canada/ QUEBEC CITY — Those with tickets to attend the Pope’s Mass northeast of Quebec City later this month will start their day very early, but a spokesperson who wondered if the schedule would be too hard for seniors natives say it now’ QUEBEC CITY — Those with tickets to attend the Pope’s mass northeast of […]]]>

QUEBEC CITY — Those with tickets to attend the Pope’s Mass northeast of Quebec City later this month will start their day very early, but a spokesperson who wondered if the schedule would be too hard for seniors natives say it now’

QUEBEC CITY — Those with tickets to attend the Pope’s mass northeast of Quebec City at the end of this month will start their day very early, but a spokesperson who wondered if the schedule would be too hard for aboriginal elders now say this is the best plan.

Organizers of the papal visit to Quebec said only shuttles from two designated locations at the Videotron Center or Mont-Ste-Anne will take people to the shrine of Ste-Anne-de-Beaupré, northeast of Quebec. , for the mass of July 28.

No vehicles will be allowed on the site and you are asked to queue at 4 a.m. for the shuttles which will only run between 5 a.m. and 7 a.m., with a long wait for the mass which begins at 10 a.m.

During a briefing last week, Jasmin Lemieux-Lefebvre, spokesperson for Quebec Indigenous Community Visitation and Liaison, said he wondered if it was excessive to ask survivors of residential schools, many of whom are seniors, to arrive early for the shuttles.

“I didn’t know if that was too much to ask,” Lemieux-Lefebvre said, adding that he’s now convinced the plan is the best. “We have done our best to find the right balance between safety and a decent and important welcome for all residential school survivors.

Pope Francis is due to visit Canada July 24-29, traveling to Alberta, Quebec and Nunavut. A major theme of his visit is reconciliation with Indigenous peoples for abuses suffered in residential schools – many of which were run by Catholic clergy.

Around 1,600 people will be allowed inside the sanctuary for the event, including around 10,000 on the ground watching on large screens. Seventy percent of tickets are reserved for Indigenous communities and approximately 2,000 general public tickets were purchased in approximately 10 minutes.

“If you don’t have a ticket, for the love of God, don’t show up at Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré,” said Benoit Thibault, head of the Quebec organizing committee, describing the plans for the events as a “great logistics operation”.

Given the long wait, organizers are encouraging attendees to bring food, a camping chair, umbrellas and coolers with refreshments. Psychological support services will be offered to Aboriginal participants. A small field hospital will also be set up to provide necessary medical care as well as sanitary facilities.

Pope Francis is expected on site approximately 45 minutes before the event and will deliver Mass in Spanish, his first language.

Large screens on site outside will provide French and English subtitles. Thanks to the website of the official visit of the pope, the mass will be translated into a dozen indigenous languages.

For those who do not have a ticket, they will be able to watch live on the Plains of Abraham in Quebec. Cinémas Guzzo, a chain of independent movie theaters in Quebec, will also broadcast the event live on 143 screens in its theaters in the Montreal area.

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on July 17, 2022.

The Canadian Press

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