Jobs in demand in Nova Scotia due to COVID-19 – Philippine Canadian Inquirer

0
The pandemic has made some jobs more in demand than others in Nova Scotia. (Photo Pexels)

COVID-19 measures have forced the workplace to look radically different from what it used to be, and some industries have been more successful than others in making the adjustments.

Canada has published a government study which highlights jobs that have been affected by the pandemic in Nova Scotia.

Many Canadians have lost their jobs or have had their hours cut as a result of public health measures aimed at curbing the spread of the virus. The sectors most affected are the hotel industry.

However, other jobs have seen an increase in demand. Here are some of those jobs. They are listed below with their National occupational classification (NOC) code.https: //9b295b888ba38c4842643b765c4bf381.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

Find out if you are eligible for Canadian immigration

1. Jobs in business, finance and administration

Much of this work can be done remotely and therefore has not been adversely affected by health measures related to the pandemic.
Here are some of the jobs in demand:

  • Financial auditors and accountants (CNP 1111);
  • Administration agents (CNP 1221);
  • Administrative assistants (CNP 1241);
  • General office support workers (CNP 1411).

2. Natural and applied sciences and related jobs

These jobs have performed relatively well throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Many were able to continue working while respecting physical distancing and other health measures, or working remotely.

People working in various fields of engineering have enjoyed good employment prospects, and the number of people working in computer and information systems positions is steadily increasing in Nova Scotia.

Below are some of the in-demand jobs: https://9b295b888ba38c4842643b765c4bf381.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

  • Information systems analysts and consultants (CNP 2171);
  • Software Engineers and Designers (NOC 2173);
  • Programmers and Interactive Media Developers (NOC 2174);
  • Deck officers, water transport (CNP 2273);
  • User support technicians (CNP 2282).

3. Health care jobs

One tenth of the workforce in Nova Scotia works in health professions. Demand for these jobs existed before COVID-19 due to the province’s aging population and the growing popularity of home care. The pandemic has further increased demand.

Here are some of the jobs that have been positively impacted:

  • Registered Nurses and Registered Psychiatric Nurses (CNP 3012);
  • Licensed practical nurses (CNP 3233);
  • Massage therapists (CNP 3236);
  • Nursing aides, orderlies and patient service workers (CNP 3413).

4. Trades, transport and equipment operators and related jobs

The pandemic has largely not affected many construction jobs. Professionals had to commit to respecting physical distancing requirements as well as using personal protective equipment (PPE) on site.

Less skilled construction jobs like carpenters, laborers and helpers are in demand and this is expected to continue.

Skilled tradespeople and heavy equipment operators may also be in demand due to an increasing number of projects in the health, roads and private sector.

Long-haul truck drivers were already in demand before the pandemic. This demand has increased considerably.

Here is a list of some of the jobs that might be in demand in Nova Scotia:

  • Carpenters (CNP 7271);
  • Transport truck drivers (CNP 7511);
  • Delivery and courier service operators (CNP 7514);
  • Heavy equipment operators, except crane (CNP 7521);
  • Construction Trades and Laborers Support Aids (CNP 7611).

How to immigrate to Nova Scotia

If you want to immigrate to Nova Scotia permanently, you may have several options to choose from. Https://9b295b888ba38c4842643b765c4bf381.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

Canada’s provinces and territories attract and retain immigrants to meet the needs of the provincial labor market. It’s about supporting Canada’s economic growth.

If you have work experience, especially in a high demand job, you may have various possibilities to obtain permanent residence in Canada.
You can also use your work experience as part of an application for permanent residence under one of Canada’s major economic class immigration programs:

To do this, you will need to use the Express entry system. However, it is important to note that this system is strictly reserved for skilled labor.

Of the jobs listed above, only the following jobs would be considered qualified:

  • Financial auditors and accountants (CNP 1111);
  • Administration agents (CNP 1221);
  • Administrative assistants (CNP 1241);
  • Information systems analysts and consultants (CNP 2171);
  • Software Engineers and Designers (NOC 2173);
  • Programmers and Interactive Media Developers (NOC 2174);
  • Deck officers, water transport (CNP 2273);
  • User support technicians (CNP 2282);
  • Registered Nurses and Registered Psychiatric Nurses (CNP 3012);
  • Licensed practical nurses (CNP 3233);
  • Massage therapists (CNP 3236);
  • Carpenters and carpenters (CNP 7271).

In addition, Nova Scotia has its own Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) with some immigration options for those with work experience.

Province Skilled Worker Stream targets skilled, semi-skilled and low-skilled workers who have a job offer from an employer in Nova Scotia.

The Flow of professions in demand targets those who have a job offer in an intermediate qualification occupation (NOC skill level C).

Qualified applicants who have worked for an employer in the province for at least one year and have an Express Entry profile may choose to apply through the Nova Scotia Experience: Express Entry Stream.https: //9b295b888ba38c4842643b765c4bf381.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

Nova Scotia also has the Labor market priorities for Express Entry applicants who meet certain provincial labor market needs.

Another option to consider is the Atlantic Immigration Pilot (AIP). This fast-track immigration program allows employers in the Atlantic provinces to hire foreign nationals for jobs they have not been able to fill in Canada. Employers do not need to obtain a Labor market impact assessment (LMIA) to hire foreign nationals through the AIP.

The Atlantic provinces are: Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador and Prince Edward Island.

Find out if you are eligible for Canadian immigration

© CIC Nouvelles All rights reserved. Visit CanadaVisa.com to find out about your Canadian immigration options.


Source link

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.