La Salle’s wife wins national competition




Brooklyn Piasta is no stranger to public speaking and shares her concern for the Canadian agricultural sector due to climate change.

After months of hard work and research, Piasta recently won first place in the 2021 National Young Canadian Speakers Competition for Agriculture.

“I was sitting at home playing board games with my dad and got an email announcing the winners and I read the email without expecting much. thing, then I saw my name and it was a pretty exciting moment, ”Piasta exclaimed.

Piasta, a grade 11 student at Sanford Collegiate, was able to enter the contest after winning the Manitoba 4-H Provincial Speech Contest earlier in the year.

4-H Manitoba paid for her entry into the CYSA contest and Piasta was able to submit her virtual speech on YouTube in early September to the 4-H Council for review. By the end of October, his speech on the effects of climate change on the Canadian agricultural sector had officially come into effect.

“For the competition, there were five topics to choose from, and this is the one that I thought was the most interesting and the most current, the one that requires current changes,” Piasta told The Headliner.

“I understand that climate change is a very broad topic within the agricultural industry and affects the long term sustainability of food production.”

By doing weeks of research before preparing for the speech, Piasta discovered that there is a direct correlation between climate change and the recent droughts the Prairie provinces have experienced in recent years.

“Droughts have been a very big problem, with the limited amounts of water we see these days causing reduced crop yields and the amounts of good crops being taken out of the ground,” Piasta explained.

“This is removing a lot of water from Canada’s water supply. Much of Canada’s water supply is needed to meet these water needs, as we receive less nowadays. “

As a result, Piasta was concerned about how much water the country needs to withdraw to support the agricultural sector of the economy.

“I was surprised to learn that agriculture is the largest consumer of Canada’s water supply and that the desperate need for water is caused by the lack of precipitation Canadians experience,” said Piasta.

Piasta has been a member of the La Salle 4-H Club for 11 years and people appreciate the hard work she has provided.

“I was incredibly proud of her, she has always been a great role model and leader of our club and seeing her get that kind of achievement was so nice,” said Michelle D’Souza, 4-H co-leader. . Club at La Salle.

“It’s seeing all of her hard work pay off over the years because she really puts a lot of effort into everything she does. You can take whatever interests you and take it further.”

D’Souza has been with the 4-H club for five years and has seen Piasta take care of car maintenance projects, learning to run a business supervised her as a mentor running a sewing group for the club . D’Souza said Piasta, the current club president has fulfilled all the roles and her speech propelled her as a leader in the community.

“Listening to her talk about it is really neat to see her understanding of such a broad subject,” D’Souza said.

“Her enthusiasm and seeing her commitment to it was pretty cool to see representing Canada. It’s not something that surprises me because she’s Brooklyn. Brooklyn takes what she does and she goes hard every step of the way. a long way. Everything she does in 4- H she works very hard to improve herself and she is constantly on the lookout for other opportunities. “

D’Souza works for the Canadian Canola Producers Association and can see Piasta becoming an important figure in the Manitoba farming community while raising awareness of an important issue.

“It’s climate change in agriculture, it’s women in agriculture, it’s these young people in agriculture who are passing it on to the next generation,” D’Souza said.

“Just seeing this succession from the older generation to the younger generation is really neat to see.”

Piasta said she hopes to pursue a post-secondary career in agriculture after graduating from high school.

Brooklyn Piasta is no stranger to public speaking and shares her concern for the Canadian agricultural sector due to climate change.

After months of hard work and research, Piasta recently won first place in the 2021 National Young Canadian Speakers Competition for Agriculture.

“I was sitting at home playing board games with my dad and got an email announcing the winners and I read the email without expecting much. thing, then I saw my name and it was a pretty exciting moment, ”Piasta exclaimed.

Piasta, a grade 11 student at Sanford Collegiate, was able to enter the contest after winning the Manitoba 4-H Provincial Speech Contest earlier in the year.

4-H Manitoba paid for her entry into the CYSA contest and Piasta was able to submit her virtual speech on YouTube in early September to the 4-H Council for review. By the end of October, his speech on the effects of climate change on the Canadian agricultural sector had officially come into effect.

“For the competition, there were five topics to choose from, and this is the one that I thought was the most interesting and the most current, the one that requires a current change,” Piasta told The Headliner.

“I understand that climate change is a very broad topic within the agricultural industry and affects the long term sustainability of food production.”

By doing weeks of research before preparing for the speech, Piasta discovered that there is a direct correlation between climate change and the recent droughts the Prairie provinces have experienced in recent years.

“Droughts have been a very big problem, with the limited amounts of water we see these days causing reduced crop yields and the amounts of good crops being taken out of the ground,” Piasta explained.

“This is removing a lot of water from Canada’s water supply. Much of Canada’s water supply is needed to meet these water needs, as we receive less nowadays. ”

As a result, Piasta was concerned about how much water the country needs to withdraw to support the agricultural sector of the economy.

“I was surprised to learn that agriculture is the main consumer of Canada’s water supply and that the desperate need for water is caused by the lack of precipitation experienced by Canadians,” said Piasta.

Piasta has been a member of the La Salle 4-H Club for 11 years and people appreciate the hard work she has provided.

“I was incredibly proud of her, she has always been a great role model and leader of our club and seeing her get that kind of achievement was so nice,” said Michelle D’Souza, 4-H co-leader. . Club at La Salle.

“It’s seeing all of her hard work pay off over the years because she really puts a lot of effort into everything she does. You can take whatever interests you and take it further.”

D’Souza has been with the 4-H club for five years and has seen Piasta take care of car maintenance projects, learning to run a business supervised her as a mentor running a sewing group for the club . D’Souza said Piasta, the current club president has fulfilled all the roles and her speech propelled her as a leader in the community.

“Listening to her talk about it is really neat to see her understanding of such a broad subject,” D’Souza said.

“Her enthusiasm and seeing her commitment to it was pretty cool to see representing Canada. It’s not something that surprises me because she’s Brooklyn. Brooklyn takes what she does and she goes hard every step of the way. a long way. Everything she does in 4- H she works very hard to improve herself and she is constantly on the lookout for other opportunities. ”

D’Souza works for the Canadian Canola Producers Association and can see Piasta becoming an important figure in the Manitoba farming community while raising awareness of an important issue.

“It’s climate change in agriculture, it’s women in agriculture, it’s these young people in agriculture who are passing it on to the next generation,” D’Souza said.

“Just seeing this succession from the older generation to the younger generation is really neat to see.”

Piasta said she hopes to pursue a post-secondary career in agriculture after graduating from high school.

Joseph Bernacki

Joseph Bernacki
Community journalist

Joseph Bernacki is The Headliner reporter / photographer. Joseph was the 2021 Vince Leah Sports intern with the Winnipeg Free Press before joining Canstar Community News. A 2020 graduate from the University of Regina School of Journalism, Joseph enjoys golfing, listening to his country music collection, and following his favorite Chicago sports teams. In his spare time, he hosts a variety talk show podcast with Better Call Saul as the weekly topic.

Read the full biography


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